Is the US next?
#13
mojomama Wrote:
Quote:I don't know what the ratio is at present, but Canada lags far behind the USA in access to and number of MRI units and other advanced imaging. Same goes for almost every type of elective surgery, such as knee and hip replacements.

But yet uninsured Americans who don't qualify for medicare or medicaid are left effectively without access to health care.  What alternative do you propose for them?

For our out-of-the-States Fish Eaters, medicare is for the elderly and medicaid is for the poor.
 
In Indiana, the underserved population can purchase medicaid for low premiums. It doesn't catch everybody, but at least more children get coverage they wouldn't otherwise have. The problem with this coverage though is that it is severely restrictive. Many treatment options and prescription medications are not allowed on it.
 
Another problem is that health insurance is so costly that many people are opting out of carrying it by choice. Every single year the premiums increase and the benfits decrease. Middle-income folks are simply too insurance poor to go to the doctor anyway because the co-pays and deductibles are set so high that unless one has a catastrophic illness the insurance benefits don't kick in. Access really isn't the issue in the States; affordability is. If even the insured can't afford an MRI, it doesn't matter how many machines are in the US.
 
Still another problem is the prescription based treatment system. Assuming one has good insurance with generous benefits and so can afford an MRI, one still has to pay for treating whatever the MRI finds. Since every ailment known to man has been reclassified as a disease (or well on the way to it) the increased costs associated with treating the "new diseases" adds up to an incredible chunk of change. For example, when I was in a car accident and got whiplash, I ended up getting an MRI on the auto insurance company's tab. Yes, I had whiplash that wasn't healing normally because I, as the MRI showed, have "degenerative disc disease." In lay terms, I am getting older. :laughing: I forget the name of the drug that was supposed to help with that, (it didn't) but it cost about 80 bucks a week, out of pocket. I finally ended up going to a pain specialist in Ft. Wayne who is skilled in prolotherapy to get some relief. If I had to pay for those treatments with regular health insurance rather than auto insurance, I would have had to pay every penny myself. In this case, health insurance proved to be worthless.
 
My prediction, for what it is worth- the same insurance companies we have now would end up calling the shots in a one payer system. These businesses have powerful lobbies and congress isn't going to do a thing without their go ahead. The high premiums we pay now will simply be replaced with higher taxes and a brand new bureaucracy filled with the same old faces.
 
 
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Messages In This Thread
Is the US next? - by AdoramusTeChriste - 12-27-2006, 10:03 AM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 10:55 AM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 11:16 AM
Is the US next? - by AdoramusTeChriste - 12-27-2006, 12:07 PM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 12:59 PM
Is the US next? - by AdoramusTeChriste - 12-27-2006, 01:14 PM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 01:24 PM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 02:03 PM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 04:04 PM
Is the US next? - by universalindult - 12-27-2006, 04:43 PM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 06:07 PM
Is the US next? - by Historian - 12-27-2006, 06:23 PM
Is the US next? - by AdoramusTeChriste - 12-27-2006, 11:02 PM



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