Dalai Lama attends Pentecost Mass of Cardinal in Vienna
#31
(05-29-2012, 07:05 PM)salus Wrote: What is the Dalai Lama's position on abortion and "gay marriage"?

I know he's against gay marriage. He actually has a fairly conservative morality which is funny considering how hipsters and lefties in the West see him as a beacon of acceptance and enlightenment.

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#32
Hippies like Buddhism simply because it's a novelty and not Western. "Let's go to Kathmandu man!"
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#33
(05-30-2012, 07:25 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Hippies like Buddhism simply because it's a novelty and not Western. "Let's go to Kathmandu man!"

That's basically it.
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#34
A lot of Westerners are actually repulsed by what the Buddha actually taught. Just like cafeteria Catholicism they will pick and choose which Buddhist teachings they like the best. You know in the traditional monastic code (Vinaya) the Buddha considered it a "defeater" offense for one of his bhikkhu's( monastics) to so much as suggest abortion or euthanasia as a viable option. By "defeater" offense is meant a monk would be expelled from the order of monastics and if I recall correctly, never allowed back in this particular lifetime.  Things like actual "rebirth" in other worlds, including various heavens and hells are rejected by many Western Buddhists as simply outmoded even though the Buddha clearly talks about them and there are plenty of stories within the various oral traditions of Buddhist monastics that talk about them as realities, kind of like if Catholics outright rejected Heaven, Hell or Purgatory and the various miracles of the saints.

We can't forget the Dalai Lama has no real authority over the worldwide Buddhist community. His brand of Buddhism is very different then, say, Zen or Theravada and many of the things taught or talked about in his Tibetan tradition would be completely foreign to the other types of Buddhists just mentioned. One thing I never liked about the Dalai Lama is how he can come off as sort of a relativist and always seemed to me to put more stock in modern Western scientific ideas then in his own Buddhism. In fact he once said something to the effect of "if science disproved Buddhism I''d have no problem accepting that". This came off to me as kind of dumb, like a man that doesn't really believe in what he is supposed to be practicing, that he, like many others today both in the Catholic and Buddhist world, have pretty much genuflected at the altar of reductionistic materialism and it's white coat high priests who claim to fathom every mystery of the universe with physics, mathematics and microscopes. But at any rate, good for him for saying no to gay marriage and abortion if that is true.
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#35
The Dalai Lama is a modern man. As a young boy he was already interested in modern gadgets and ideas. He attempted modernizing reforms within Tibet before they were taken over by the Chinese, and he has tried to have a moderating influence on some of the most superstitious practices of their Buddhism. He also ruffles feathers now and then. (Example: http://dalailama.com/messages/dolgyal-sh...n-affair-i) What could we expect from him? He is a modern conservative. He adheres to all of the tenets of his religion, but he also sees room for compromise. Keep in mind that within Tibetan Buddhism there is wide room to accept outside influence. So we can think of him as a benevolent ecumenist of the Gandhi mold. He is a powerful influence for inspiring natural virtue, but Tibetan Buddhism is a not a good place for people to go.

What we can hope is that Tibetans will convert.

http://english.gov.cn/2005-10/28/content_86137.htm

As for Westerners draw to Buddhism. I think really that is too varied to say. But I think one important aspect of Buddhism is its lack of central authority. This appeals a lot of apostates, and leaves room for people to "craft" their own spirituality. As pointed out, this often denies or contradicts actual Buddhist teachings. The Buddha is not modernist. His sangha (community) was purely celibate. Sex once got you kicked out for life. They were strictly non-violent, as pointed out already. Also they weren't feminist as supposed, although may have been progressive for the time. The Buddha said that the life of his teaching being pure was reduced because he ordained women to be nuns. He placed additional rule upon them, including many which subjected the nuns to the monks. And nuns couldn't ordain themselves. Hence, nun lineages have died out, although Westerners have been trying to kick start them again through a Chinese lineage. The point is that apostates, heretics, wanderers, skeptics, and the whole lot are cafeteria in their methods no matter what the religion. Adherence to a tradition of a religion is rare across the board. We can only pray that some Buddhist or Dalai Lama devotee would be turned on by him being pious in a cathedral. We can hope.
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#36
One of the really unfortunate actions of the Dalai Lama:
Quote:For this reason, a political compromise was inconceivable for the man many worship as a "god-king." That was despite the entreaties of his Tibetan followers, no matter how much they begged him to at least remain the ceremonial leader of the government-in-exile, which he established more than 50 years ago in the Indian town of Dharamsala after the Chinese Communists had forced him to flee from the Tibetan capital Lhasa. The Dalai Lama no longer wants to hold any political responsibility.

"It has nothing to do with resignation, or health reasons, only with insight," he said in a recent interview with SPIEGEL in the French city of Toulouse, where he was giving lectures on Buddhism, before traveling to Germany this week as the guest of the Hessian state government in the western city of Wiesbaden. "I have taken a close look at all forms of government. A democratic parliament with an elected prime minister is the only modern and functioning one. Monarchy: yesterday. Theocracy: from the day before yesterday. I believe in the separation of church and state. But what sort of a hypocrite would I be if I didn't draw any conclusions from this realization?"
http://www.spiegel.de/international/worl...82329.html
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#37
(05-30-2012, 08:12 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: The Dalai Lama is a modern man. As a young boy he was already interested in modern gadgets and ideas. He attempted modernizing reforms within Tibet before they were taken over by the Chinese, and he has tried to have a moderating influence on some of the most superstitious practices of their Buddhism. He also ruffles feathers now and then. (Example: http://dalailama.com/messages/dolgyal-sh...n-affair-i) What could we expect from him? He is a modern conservative. He adheres to all of the tenets of his religion, but he also sees room for compromise. Keep in mind that within Tibetan Buddhism there is wide room to accept outside influence. So we can think of him as a benevolent ecumenist of the Gandhi mold. He is a powerful influence for inspiring natural virtue, but Tibetan Buddhism is a not a good place for people to go.

What we can hope is that Tibetans will convert.

http://english.gov.cn/2005-10/28/content_86137.htm

As for Westerners draw to Buddhism. I think really that is too varied to say. But I think one important aspect of Buddhism is its lack of central authority. This appeals a lot of apostates, and leaves room for people to "craft" their own spirituality. As pointed out, this often denies or contradicts actual Buddhist teachings. The Buddha is not modernist. His sangha (community) was purely celibate. Sex once got you kicked out for life. They were strictly non-violent, as pointed out already. Also they weren't feminist as supposed, although may have been progressive for the time. The Buddha said that the life of his teaching being pure was reduced because he ordained women to be nuns. He placed additional rule upon them, including many which subjected the nuns to the monks. And nuns couldn't ordain themselves. Hence, nun lineages have died out, although Westerners have been trying to kick start them again through a Chinese lineage. The point is that apostates, heretics, wanderers, skeptics, and the whole lot are cafeteria in their methods no matter what the religion. Adherence to a tradition of a religion is rare across the board. We can only pray that some Buddhist or Dalai Lama devotee would be turned on by him being pious in a cathedral. We can hope.

You are right, the Buddha himself was no modernist in any sense of the word. And I agree, perhaps some Buddhist will see the Dalai Lama in a Cathedral and somehow be given the grace to start exploring the Catholic faith.  As an aside I wasn't aware about the whole womens ordination thing in Buddhism. That in and of itself is interesting.
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#38
I converted from Tibetan Buddhism!  :)
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#39
What brought you out of it Miss Fluffy? Was it a quick conversion?
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#40
The Dalai Lama may hold to more Catholic morals than many self-professed Catholics:

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