Why do some trad priests keep on talking about "temperaments"?
#31
Also, the link might be less that melancholics incline to Tradition, and more that melancholics incline to post on web forums.  Grin
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#32
(11-19-2011, 03:07 PM)Scriptorium Wrote:
(11-19-2011, 12:06 PM)Richard C Wrote:
(11-16-2011, 11:46 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I've found that this method is surprisingly accurate. I'm pretty much exactly like the Melancholic temperament down to the letter.

So far, I've noticed that most FE are melancholic. I've begun to wonder if one has to be to appreciate tradition. I'll bet on CAF most people are sanguine, too.

Also most people who runs schools are melancholic. That's why a lot of sanguines and phlematics have a hard time there. This is another plus of reading about the temperaments. By the way, my priest is a sanguine. A mature sanguine, or any mature temperament, can be traditional. They will, however, emphasize different aspects of the Faith. A sanguine may love the music, incense, and the exterior elements. They may love the social aspect. very fascinating. By the way, Keirsey gives this estimate for the population (so don't be surprised if many trads are melancholic):

Sanguine: 40%
Melancholic : 40%
Choleric: 10%
Phlematic: 10%

Could you expand on that more?  I'm healvily plegmatic, so fin this insteresting.
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#33
(11-19-2011, 04:20 PM)drummerboy Wrote:
(11-19-2011, 03:07 PM)Scriptorium Wrote:
(11-19-2011, 12:06 PM)Richard C Wrote:
(11-16-2011, 11:46 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I've found that this method is surprisingly accurate. I'm pretty much exactly like the Melancholic temperament down to the letter.

So far, I've noticed that most FE are melancholic. I've begun to wonder if one has to be to appreciate tradition. I'll bet on CAF most people are sanguine, too.

Also most people who runs schools are melancholic. That's why a lot of sanguines and phlematics have a hard time there. This is another plus of reading about the temperaments. By the way, my priest is a sanguine. A mature sanguine, or any mature temperament, can be traditional. They will, however, emphasize different aspects of the Faith. A sanguine may love the music, incense, and the exterior elements. They may love the social aspect. very fascinating. By the way, Keirsey gives this estimate for the population (so don't be surprised if many trads are melancholic):

Sanguine: 40%
Melancholic : 40%
Choleric: 10%
Phlematic: 10%

Could you expand on that more?  I'm healvily plegmatic, so fin this insteresting.

Just that public schools are typically run with sit in your chair, show up on time, do this seat work, do this test, get the grade, etc. rigid mentality. Not every school, and there are notable changes in the culture. But sanguines often are too "hyper" to fit in, sit still, be quiet, or want to push the envelope a bit. The highest drop out rates are probably among sanguines. Phlematics often want to move ahead, or the content is dull to them, or they don't think the teacher has anything worthwhile for them to learn (they should be the teacher). Phlematics may drop out, or just put up with it to get by, but they aren't engaged unless they have a really cool teacher. Melacholics love the rules, the order, the grades, the hierarchy, etc. They then go on to become teachers! Cholerics generally go with the flow because they want to see harmony. If they find the right situation, they may thrive also. Obviously learning styles are involved too (visual, etc.) and my descriptions are crude, but that's the gist.

The best book I've read, which I referenced before, is Please Understand Me II: Temperament, Character, Intelligence, by David Keirsey. That and the one below also referenced by others

http://catholinks.com/FourTemperaments.htm
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#34
temperance is one of the four cardinal virtues. 
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#35
The best thing I ever read on temperaments came from Latin Mass Magazine.  I have been sharing it with my non-Catholic friends and they said it was like the priest could look inside their minds!

From what I understand, Catholics took Hippocrates' 4 temperaments and developed them in the Midle Ages to what we have today.  They have been around quite a while and I am finding useful to understand myself, my husband and my children.

The articles in LMM deal with the spiritual life and how the different temperaments should use different books and methods.  I found it very useful to understand why The Imitation of Christ  has absolutely no appeal to me whatsoever nor do I find it particularly useful.  The article pointed out that  The Imitation  is quite useful for Cholerics as their predominant fault tends to be pride, whereas a Melancholic personality does much better with St. Francis DeSales Introduction to the Devout Life   and his emphasis on the love God has for us because Melancholics have a hard time believing they are lovable.

I am predominantly Sanguine, with a secondary of Phlegmatic, a pinch of Melancholy, and absolutely no Choleric.  Therefore, the article recommends Psalms and Proverbs for meditations as the Sanguine tends to get easily distracted.  The other recommendation is that the Sanguine draw up a list of priorities, eliminate everything but those priorities from their life and add nothing else in until they can do those faithfully and consistently.

I am just beginning. Grin

It is wayyyyy to easy to get distracted on the internet or reading for me.

BTW, the articles are found in the following issues of LMM -- Sanguine in Summer 2006, Melancholic in Fall 2005, Choleric in Advent/Christmas 2005, and Winter 2007.  LMM would be happy to send you copies of the articles or magazines. 

I am handing copies out of these just as fast as people read them.

THey are all written by a Fr. Christiaan Kappes from the Archdiocese of Indianapolis

And I do believe that Fr. says that the more you mature in the spiritual life, the more balanced your temperament becomes.

His other comment is "In this article I shall be focusing on the melancholic soul.  More often than not, among traditional Catholics, there then to be higher numbers of pure Melancholics.   (emphasis mine) My own pastoral experience would indicate that more women exhibit melancholic temperaments than men in this environ.  Some have an admixture of melancholic-sanguine or sanguine-melancholic, but generally there are many prone toward features of the melancholic understanding of self."
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#36
Bah.  This temperament nonsense is nothing but astrology for Catholics.  The astrology fanatic will say, "Wow, it's amazing how accurate this stuff is.  It's like it was written about me!"  It also reminds me of these so-called "psychics" who predict a dead body will be found next to a railroad track, a school, a church or a body of water and then people are amazed when that turns out to be true.  What most people don't realize is that 99.9% of everything in the civilized world is located "near" a railroad track, a school, a church or a body of water.  "Cold readings" are the same way.  This is all just variations of parlor tricks used to dupe the credulous.  Bah, I say again.
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#37
(11-16-2011, 04:32 AM)Marc Wrote: Because enneagrams are so spirit of Vatican II.

It's funny you should mention this. I just read that, according to Fr. Malachi Martin in his book "Hostage to the Devil," the Enneagram Method used so prominently by the Jesuits is one of the primary methods the devil uses to possess a person.

Source: Malachi Martin "Hostage to the Devil" preface, Harper San Francisco
edition published 1992.
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#38
(11-16-2011, 09:07 PM)Doce Me Wrote: I learned about the four temperaments when I was young, from  an excellent small book called  The Four Temperaments by Rev. Conrad Hock.  It is a very Catholic and very concise book, and well worth reading by any Catholic who is trying to know and improve himself.  Here it is online http://catholinks.com/FourTemperaments.htm

It's not all nonsense, even if there is a lot it doesn't explain.  Try this book.

Has anyone ever started a poll asking what is your predominant temperament? Maybe include a link to this online book.  (I haven't got a fishy needed to create a poll)
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#39
(08-16-2012, 12:21 AM)Doce Me Wrote:
(11-16-2011, 09:07 PM)Doce Me Wrote: I learned about the four temperaments when I was young, from  an excellent small book called  The Four Temperaments by Rev. Conrad Hock.  It is a very Catholic and very concise book, and well worth reading by any Catholic who is trying to know and improve himself.  Here it is online http://catholinks.com/FourTemperaments.htm

It's not all nonsense, even if there is a lot it doesn't explain.  Try this book.

Has anyone ever started a poll asking what is your predominant temperament? Maybe include a link to this online book.  (I haven't got a fishy needed to create a poll)

[can't edit]

The ideas in this book are not related to the Enneagram Method (at least it most certainly is not in any way diabolical).
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