Strange question: embalming dead
#1
Since people are embalmed now or taken to find cause of death by medical examiner and the body is basically dissected..... How can even people who may be saints have their bodies remain incorruptible at rest with all this messing around?
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#2
I am a retired coroner and the veteran of about 4000+ legal cases/autopsies.  I can tell you, the embalming process is far more destructive to the body than most autopsies, especially ones limited to examination of the heart, etc.  Not sure if this information is helpful or even relevant to this discussion, but most people think of autopsies as horrible, whereas they are conducted in a surgical fashion, Y-incision, organs returned to the body (except for tissues taken for micro, etc.).  Embalming involves not only the draining of blood, but also the use of trocars, etc. to puncture organs within the body.  Even with the very best embalming, the body and its tissues will nonetheless begin to decompose over time.
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#3
I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.
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#4
(08-26-2012, 01:04 PM)verenaerin Wrote: I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.

Can you say, 'Undertakers' Lobby'? :) It's required by law in many places. For instance, in Kansas, the body must be embalmed unless the burial takes place within 24 hours of death and the body is buried in the county in which the death took place.
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#5
(08-25-2012, 12:10 PM)candyapple Wrote: How can even people who may be saints have their bodies remain incorruptible at rest with all this messing around?

Well, the incorruptible part does not mean life like or the entire body. Martyrs for example are a case where pieces of them have remained incorrupt.

Also, for canonization, they take relics. I was shocked when I read how they did it (at least, in the past). Sometimes it costs an arm or a leg, even for the incorrupt.
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#6
(08-26-2012, 01:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:04 PM)verenaerin Wrote: I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.

Can you say, 'Undertakers' Lobby'? :) It's required by law in many places. For instance, in Kansas, the body must be embalmed unless the burial takes place within 24 hours of death and the body is buried in the county in which the death took place.

This would scare me to death. I want to make sure I'm good and dead when they bury me, so, embalm away!
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#7
(08-26-2012, 07:32 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:04 PM)verenaerin Wrote: I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.

Can you say, 'Undertakers' Lobby'? :) It's required by law in many places. For instance, in Kansas, the body must be embalmed unless the burial takes place within 24 hours of death and the body is buried in the county in which the death took place.

This would scare me to death. I want to make sure I'm good and dead when they bury me, so, embalm away!

I would think you would run out of oxygen in the casket rather quickly anyway, especially since most modern caskets are air tight.  Still, I suppose it would be a rather terrifying few minutes. 
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#8
(08-26-2012, 07:47 PM)DrBombay Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 07:32 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:04 PM)verenaerin Wrote: I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.

Can you say, 'Undertakers' Lobby'? :) It's required by law in many places. For instance, in Kansas, the body must be embalmed unless the burial takes place within 24 hours of death and the body is buried in the county in which the death took place.

This would scare me to death. I want to make sure I'm good and dead when they bury me, so, embalm away!

I would think you would run out of oxygen in the casket rather quickly anyway, especially since most modern caskets are air tight.  Still, I suppose it would be a rather terrifying few minutes. 

If the story is true, Thomas a Kemis could attest to that fact!  :((
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#9
(08-26-2012, 01:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:04 PM)verenaerin Wrote: I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.

Can you say, 'Undertakers' Lobby'? :) It's required by law in many places. For instance, in Kansas, the body must be embalmed unless the burial takes place within 24 hours of death and the body is buried in the county in which the death took place.

Crazy. It's so expensive, thank goodness that is not the law where I live.
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#10
(08-26-2012, 07:47 PM)DrBombay Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 07:32 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:07 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-26-2012, 01:04 PM)verenaerin Wrote: I am not really sure why embalming has become so standard. When my grandmother dies we did not do this, or have an autopsy.

Can you say, 'Undertakers' Lobby'? :) It's required by law in many places. For instance, in Kansas, the body must be embalmed unless the burial takes place within 24 hours of death and the body is buried in the county in which the death took place.

This would scare me to death. I want to make sure I'm good and dead when they bury me, so, embalm away!

I would think you would run out of oxygen in the casket rather quickly anyway, especially since most modern caskets are air tight.  Still, I suppose it would be a rather terrifying few minutes. 

If you weren't dead already, I think the embalming process would do it pretty quickly.  

Did you know they lock caskets, Mumbai?

I was in a flea market/ junque shop once a few years ago and found a box of casket keys.  At least, the box was labeled as such and the label was printed on the box,was part of the box, not something added or handwritten.

Keeping grave robbers out did come to mind but I think the casket has to be in a sealed concrete vault in most states and that should stop them before they got to the casket.

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