Information on the Schism of the Orthodox Church.
#1
An aquaintance wants to know why the East broke from the Holy Fathers authority.

Does anyone have any short concise easy to understand source material on how and why the Great Schism occurred?

Thank you.
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#2
(08-31-2012, 02:38 PM)Old Salt Wrote: An aquaintance wants to know why the East broke from the Holy Fathers authority.

Does anyone have any short concise easy to understand source material on how and why the Great Schism occurred?

Thank you.

Well, frankly, the whole thing is rather Byzantine.  :pipe:
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#3
(08-31-2012, 02:38 PM)Old Salt Wrote: Does anyone have any short concise easy to understand source material on how and why the Great Schism occurred?

From a non-polemical Orthodox perspective, I would recommend Church, Papacy and Schism, A Theological Enquiry, by Philip Sherrard.  If you do not understand the Orthodox perspective, you will never understand the schism.  It was actually a process.  The West's understanding of the papacy "developed."  The East did not agree with that development.

:owl:
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#4
Thank you, but I am actually looking for a factual piece on why the Orthodox went into schim and rejected the Authority of Peter, so I guess a Western truthful piece.
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#5
I don't think you can find a short, concise, easy to understand answer on this subject, because it's not a short, concise, easy to understand subject.  It was indeed a gradual thing that built up over a long time.  You can't even really point to a specific moment it occurred.
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#6

Do the Orthodox have Confession like in the Catholic Church?
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#7
(08-31-2012, 04:51 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: Do the Orthodox have Confession like in the Catholic Church?
From my understanding they have the scarament, but it is administered a lot differently than the Latin Rite [west] Church.
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#8
(08-31-2012, 04:51 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: Do the Orthodox have Confession like in the Catholic Church?

Yes.

There are no confessionals.  Depending on the particular jurisdiction (Russian, Antiochian, etc.) one confesses either in front of the iconostasis (in front of the icon of St. John the Baptist, for example) or off to the side at the front by a small table bearing the book of the Gospels and a crucifix.  The priest puts his stole over the head of the penitent and hears the confession.  It is quite beautiful.

Orthodox Christians are expected to confess regularly if they are receiving Holy Communion.  The priests monitor this.  One is supposed to confess to one's own priest (but going to a nearby priest-monk for confession is allowed, as long as it is a regular arrangement).  A priest will refuse Communion to someone who has not been to confession in awhile.  The exception to all this is the Greeks.  They are notoriously lax.

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#9
"Orthodox Christians are expected to confess regularly if they are receiving Holy Communion. "

At the local Byzantine Catholic parish, the pastor only schedules confession during "Great Lent" and has said in his homily [I heard it] that one does not need to confess grave sins auricularly but just needs to have true contrition in heart, to recieve the Blessed Sacrament.
[He has aslo said that all aborted unbaptised babies go right to heaven]
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#10
(08-31-2012, 05:10 PM)Old Salt Wrote: At the local Byzantine Catholic parish, the pastor only schedules confession during "Great Lent" and has said in his homily [I heard it] that one does not need to confess grave sins auricularly but just needs to have true contrition in heart, to recieve the Blessed Sacrament.

That's one difference between Byzantine Catholics and Orthodox.  They're not the same.  The Byzantine Catholics are more infected with Modernism, thanks to their contacts with Latin clergy.
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