What is considered "Catholic culture"?
#1
I see this tossed around a lot, but no one defines it. Catholic culture seems to range from being a "trad," to being heavily involved in the parish community.

What has the Church said about Catholic culture? How is it defined? Is it based on beliefs, or lifestyles?
Reply
#2
I honestly feel that the modern Church has no culture. Is modern Catholic culture any different from Protestant culture? Traditionalism carries much more weight when it comes to customs and culture.
Reply
#3
Okay, what is "traditionalism"?

I don't know if the Church has no culture. People make a culture, and a lot of the people are too mainstream to care for a culture IMO. It's clear the Church always had a culture in mind, but it's not translating well with the people.
Reply
#4


Introvert, see this page:  FETradition
Reply
#5
Yes, I've read that. But it doesn't answer my question. I'll expand.

Often what I read is Catholic culture is a combination of beliefs and lifestyles. For instance, in order to be a "proper" traditional Catholic one must have at least 4 children, attend a parish offering the EF, wife is a homemaker, husband never does laundry, etc. Please do not get me wrong, I am in no way making a caricature here. This is what is held as traditional Catholic living.

What happens when you keep the faith, but you don't follow the lifestyle precepts? Not because you refuse to, but because of life in general?
Reply
#6
I'm sorry, but this is a caricature. You can't simply say, after painting a caricature, that it isn't and pretend it isn't. And of course, you left out the most traditional lifestyles ever, viz., monks and priests.
It seems your question is not interested in traditional Catholic culture at all--that is, the old Christendom, the communities formed around the Sacrifice, the liturgical life, etc.--but only what would a traditional Catholic family would look like if it were to be featured at a sitcom.

Anyway, if you are interested to learn about family life there's plenty of resources, like Arcanum divinae sapientiae and Casti connubii.
Reply
#7
(09-26-2015, 11:28 AM)introvert Wrote: Yes, I've read that. But it doesn't answer my question. I'll expand.

Often what I read is Catholic culture is a combination of beliefs and lifestyles. For instance, in order to be a "proper" traditional Catholic one must have at least 4 children, attend a parish offering the EF, wife is a homemaker, husband never does laundry, etc. Please do not get me wrong, I am in no way making a caricature here. This is what is held as traditional Catholic living.

What happens when you keep the faith, but you don't follow the lifestyle precepts? Not because you refuse to, but because of life in general?

My wife and I have no children, alternate between a TLM and a Byzantine DL in a nearby town, we both have jobs, and I do laundry if I happen to realize I need to wash something. We are entirely a part of the "traditional Catholic" culture in our area.

Now, to perhaps match your caricature a bit more, we are in the middle of an adoption process, and when that goes through my wife will probably quit her job to be a stay at home mom. Not sure about laundry...if she's home more she'll probably do more I wouldn't reject doing it on principle or anything (I mean, who did my laundry when I lived alone?)

I do think that the lack of "Catholic culture" is a significant problem. My grandparents lived in a predominately Catholic neighborhood (suburban...think fifties and sixties, not twenties and thirties) that was, from what I can tell, un-selfconscious about it. They just went to church and went to Catholic school and joined Cathokic groups and were Irish or Italian or Polish or whatever they were. Now, the people who care about "Catholic stuff" are few and far between. And they live widely spread out from eachother. I tend to think something isn't "culture" if you constantly have to think about it and try for it. Culture gets passed on by simply living it. I wish that the people who care about the Catholic Church in my area could all live near each other, but it is nearly impossible to make that happen, and difficult to pass on culture only within one family.
Reply
#8
catholic culture is getting all your sacraments done because of mom and never going to mass or confession and thinking all church dogmas and traditions were abrogated after vatican II.

oh, and that rosaries are cool necklaces.
Reply
#9
(09-26-2015, 12:32 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote: I'm sorry, but this is a caricature. You can't simply say, after painting a caricature, that it isn't and pretend it isn't. And of course, you left out the most traditional lifestyles ever, viz., monks and priests.
It seems your question is not interested in traditional Catholic culture at all--that is, the old Christendom, the communities formed around the Sacrifice, the liturgical life, etc.--but only what would a traditional Catholic family would look like if it were to be featured at a sitcom.

Anyway, if you are interested to learn about family life there's plenty of resources, like Arcanum divinae sapientiae and Casti connubii.

I asked a question because it's what I have seen and read to be heralded as the "proper" lifestyle. Do you know what it's like to be told you're not living the "traditional" life because you don't have children? Or your marriage isn't following proper complementary procedure because your husband also does laundry? I have been told these things by Catholics before. I wish I could say I was joking, but it's not one at all. You'd be surprised by the things Catholics have told me...
Reply
#10
(09-26-2015, 02:29 PM)Optatus Cleary Wrote: I tend to think something isn't "culture" if you constantly have to think about it and try for it. Culture gets passed on by simply living it. I wish that the people who care about the Catholic Church in my area could all live near each other, but it is nearly impossible to make that happen, and difficult to pass on culture only within one family.

Your response was very insightful. The bolded is what I'm talking about in particular. On blogs and online articles, there's plenty of the "think about it and try for it" going on. It's like a formula that must be done in a particular order, and if you aren't doing it just that way it's not right. At least, according to those people.

(09-26-2015, 02:35 PM)Zea mays Wrote: catholic culture is getting all your sacraments done because of mom and never going to mass or confession and thinking all church dogmas and traditions were abrogated after vatican II.

oh, and that rosaries are cool necklaces.

Gosh that sounds awful. Like a fad.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)