Destruction of the faith?
#1
https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusiv...inal-sarah


It is inevitable now, there is no going back anymore.  Following Francis and his heresy, or staying true to the teachings of Christ.c what areally we true Catholics supposed to do?
Reply
#2
(10-26-2017, 05:29 AM)BenjaminJ Wrote: https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusiv...inal-sarah


It is inevitable now, there is no going back anymore.  Following Francis and his heresy, or staying true to the teachings of Christ.c what areally we true Catholics supposed to do?

Not to despair, we have 2000 years of teaching to rely on. The Church has been in predicaments like this before and survived and will survive again.

Read books by the saints, work on personal sanctity, find places like FE that provide encouragement, DO NOT DESPAIR.

There is no doubt things are off the rails. There is also no doubt that God is in complete control and is allowing this to happen. So the question becomes if God is allowing this to happen what is God trying to teach you, Benjamin? Are you listening? Where does God what YOU to go?
"There are in truth three states of the converted: the beginning,  the middle and the perfection. In the beginning, they experience the charms of sweetness; in the middle, the contests of temptation; and in the end, the fullness of perfection."
-- Pope St. Gregory

“One day, through the Rosary and the Scapular, Our Lady will save the world.”
-- attributed to Saint Domenic
Reply
#3
I firmly believe that  God calls me to follow the original teachings. Just feel alone that my church has abandoned me and the true faith.

Spending  a lot of time reading Devine Intimacy
Reply
#4
(10-26-2017, 05:29 AM)BenjaminJ Wrote: https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusiv...inal-sarah


It is inevitable now, there is no going back anymore.  Following Francis and his heresy, or staying true to the teachings of Christ.c what areally we true Catholics supposed to do?

Follow the Faith, and oppose anyone who opposes it including, and perhaps most especially, a faithless pope.
Reply
#5
Stay close to Jesus (in the Eucharist), dive into prayer (Liturgy of the Hours and the Rosary) and maintain an even keel.

Remember God's got this and we know how the story ends. He is victorious! We just need to remain unfalteringly faithful to the Truth.

Has there ever been a time when the Church was free from strife? Jesus promised us persecution if we follow Him. "If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me". It has never been easy to be a Christian, and it never will be. There have been heresies and anti-popes, schism...all manner of upheaval...and yet, century after century, millennia after millennia, the Church remains, as Christ promised.

Be comforted in the knowledge that until the day the Father has determined that His Son should return, the Church will remain.

Why does God allow this? I don't know...

Here, though, is something to consider: Has it ever been as easy as it is now, to ascertain who is with Him and who is not? There are guys taking heavy fire...and it has allowed us to see where the assault is coming from. The enemies of the Church are no longer in hidding, but have become emboldened and stand exposed.
Reply
#6
(10-26-2017, 05:29 AM)BenjaminJ Wrote: https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusiv...inal-sarah


It is inevitable now, there is no going back anymore.  Following Francis and his heresy, or staying true to the teachings of Christ.c what areally we true Catholics supposed to do?

First off, we follow Francis as far as he is willing to proceed as a Catholic Pope. It seems that his intentions to pray for sick and unborn are about as far as any orthodox Catholic may go. We also stay true to the Teachings of Christ, and of the Church, regardless whoever is Pope.

Thirdly, we pray for Cardinal Sarah and others like him just as much, certainly more, than we complain, gripe, and moan about theirs and our suffering on here. Cardinal Sarah needs our prayers, as does Francis.

Also let us not be so panicky, we all flipped out when Cardinal Burke was kicked out, now he's back.
[-] The following 1 user Likes austenbosten's post:
  • Kate7
Reply
#7
When in the entire history of the Church has the Catholic doctrine on marriage been so under attack from within ? When has the Church's teaching on homosexuality been so under attack from within ? When has the teaching that we are the one true Church been so under attack from within ?  The truth is we have never been in this situation before.
Reply
#8
(10-26-2017, 11:13 AM)Eric F Wrote: When in the entire history of the Church has the Catholic doctrine on marriage been so under attack from within ? When has the Church's teaching on homosexuality been so under attack from within ? When has the teaching that we are the one true Church been so under attack from within ?  The truth is we have never been in this situation before.

While it's true that we've not been in quite this mess before, there have been many times where things have been bad enough that the temptation to despair can be strong. It's vital to remember Our Lord's words: " and behold I am with you all days, even to the consummation of the world." The Church is suffering, yes, not the least of which is at the top. But it cannot fall, because of its head. Pray for the clergy, especially the Holy Father. I will admit, when I pray my Rosary, I follow up with prayers for his conversion. And there are times when reading news regarding the Church is tantamount to a near occasion of sin because of frustration. But don't lose hope. All is certainly not lost.
Eternal Father, I offer Thee the most precious blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said Throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory. Amen.
Reply
#9
How about during the Arian controversy, when it was not the teachings of the Church, but the very bedrock, the way we view Christ, that was under attack? St Athanasius stood alone against the world. Exiled by four different Emperors for his orthodox beliefs, shunned by virtually all the other Bishops, excommunicated by Pope Liberius, it was literally "Athanasius contra mundum".

Today, we are blessed that it is not just one Bishop that stands for Catholic Truth. We have many, plus, just as St Athanasius did, we have Christ's promise that the gates of hell shall not prevail. Yes, these are trying time, but hold fast to the Faith, pray, and leave it up to God, knowing that whether we live to see it or not, the Faith will triumph!
Jovan-Marya of the Immaculate Conception Weismiller, T.O.Carm.

Vive le Christ-roi! Vive le roi, Louis XX!
Deum timete, regem honorificate.
Kansan by birth! Albertan by choice! Jayhawk by the Grace of God!
“Qui me amat, amet et canem meum. (Who loves me will love my dog.)” 
St Bernard of Clairvaux

My Blog 'Musings of an Old Curmudgeon'
FishEaters Group on MeWe
[-] The following 2 users Like jovan66102's post:
  • dahveed, SaintSebastian
Reply
#10
Pope Ratzinger said this in 1969, about the Church in the year A.D. 2000:


Let us, therefore, be cautious in our prognostications.  What St. Augustine said is still true: man is an abyss; what will rise out of these depths, no one can see in advance.  And whoever believes that the Church is not only determined by the abyss that is man, but reaches down into the greater, infinite abyss that is God, will be the first to hesitate with his predictions, for this naïve desire to know for sure could only be the announcement of his own historical ineptitude....

The future of the Church can and will issue from those whose roots are deep and who live from the pure fullness of their faith.  It will not issue from those who accommodate themselves merely to the passing moment or from those who merely criticize others and assume that they themselves are infallible measuring rods; nor will it issue from those who take the easier road, who sidestep the passion of faith, declaring false and obsolete, tyrannous and legalistic, all that makes demands upon men, that hurts them and compels them to sacrifice themselves.

To put this more positively: The future of the Church, once again as always, will be reshaped by saints, by men, that is, whose minds probe deeper than the slogans of the day, who see more than others see, because their lives embrace a wider reality.

Unselfishness, which makes men free, is attained only through the patience of small daily acts of self-denial.  By this daily passion, which alone reveals to a man in how many ways he is enslaved by his own ego, by this daily passion and by it alone, a man’s eyes are slowly opened.  He sees only to the extent that he has lived and suffered.  If today we are scarcely able any longer to become aware of God, that is because we find it so easy to evade ourselves, to flee from the depths of our being by means of the narcotic of some pleasure or other.  Thus our own interior depths remain closed to us.  If it is true that a man can see only with his heart, then how blind we are!

How does all this affect the problem we are examining?  It means that the big talk of those who prophesy a Church without God and without faith is all empty chatter.  We have no need of a Church that celebrates the cult of action in political prayers.  It is utterly superfluous.  Therefore, it will destroy itself.
 
What will remain is the Church of Jesus Christ, the Church that believes in the God who has become man and promises us life beyond death.  The kind of priest who is no more than a social worker can be replaced by the psychotherapist and other specialists; but the priest who is no specialist, who does not stand on the [sidelines], watching the game, giving official advice, but in the name of God places himself at the disposal of man, who is beside them in their sorrows, in their joys, in their hope and in their fear, such a priest will certainly be needed in the future. 
Let us go a step farther.  From the crisis of today the Church of tomorrow will emerge — a Church that has lost much.  She will become small and will have to start afresh more or less from the beginning.  She will no longer be able to inhabit many of the edifices she built in prosperity.  As the number of her adherents diminishes, so it will lose many of her social privileges.

In contrast to an earlier age, it will be seen much more as a voluntary society, entered only by free decision.  As a small society, it will make much bigger demands on the initiative of her individual members.  Undoubtedly it will discover new forms of ministry and will ordain to the priesthood approved Christians who pursue some profession.  In many smaller congregations or in self-contained social groups, pastoral care will normally be provided in this fashion.  Along-side this, the full-time ministry of the priesthood will be indispensable as formerly.  But in all of the changes at which one might guess, the Church will find her essence afresh and with full conviction in that which was always at her center: faith in the triune God, in Jesus Christ, the Son of God made man, in the presence of the Spirit until the end of the world.  In faith and prayer she will again recognize the sacraments as the worship of God and not as a subject for liturgical scholarship.
 
The Church will be a more spiritual Church, not presuming upon a political mandate, flirting as little with the Left as with the Right.  It will be hard going for the Church, for the process of crystallization and clarification will cost her much valuable energy.  It will make her poor and cause her to become the Church of the meek.  The process will be all the more arduous, for sectarian narrow-mindedness as well as pompous self-will will have to be shed.  One may predict that all of this will take time.  The process will be long and wearisome as was the road from the false progressivism on the eve of the French Revolution — when a bishop might be thought smart if he made fun of dogmas and even insinuated that the existence of God was by no means certain — to the renewal of the nineteenth century.

But when the trial of this sifting is past, a great power will flow from a more spiritualized and simplified Church.  Men in a totally planned world will find themselves unspeakably lonely.  If they have completely lost sight of God, they will feel the whole horror of their poverty.  Then they will discover the little flock of believers as something wholly new.  They will discover it as a hope that is meant for them, an answer for which they have always been searching in secret.

And so it seems certain to me that the Church is facing very hard times.  The real crisis has scarcely begun.  We will have to count on terrific upheavals.  But I am equally certain about what will remain at the end: not the Church of the political cult, which is dead already, but the Church of faith.  It may well no longer be the dominant social power to the extent that she was until recently; but it will enjoy a fresh blossoming and be seen as man’s home, where he will find life and hope beyond death.
T h e   D u d e t t e   A b i d e s
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)