The Christmas (Eve) menu and trying not to have anxiety over it
#11
(12-07-2020, 10:08 PM)Elle19 Wrote: How do you do all this?!

I guess find a way to do it because it's what my family's always done, but don't think I won't get started the Monday before Christmas Eve.  There's something especially beautiful about keeping tradition alive, even when it's difficult to accomplish a task.

In a practical sense, the soups have to be made at least one day ahead anyway, and some things can be 90% finished and parked in the fridge without any deterioration in quality. I might even make the desserts over the next two weekends and freeze them.
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#12
(12-07-2020, 01:08 PM)NSMSSS Wrote:
(12-05-2020, 11:36 PM)yablabo Wrote: We do not practice the fasting and abstinence on Christmas Eve; it is no longer obligatory.

Nor are most of the other things that make us "traditional Catholics", but given how throwing out almost all the fasting days has greatly scandalized the faithful and weakened the Church, I would be fearful of not keeping what really ought to still be the rules.

We have it so easy compared to our forefathers.  This really isn't right.

I am in no way trying to be controversial.  I am simply not a trad.  Some people love to keep the traditions like the ancient fasts/days of abstinence alive, and good on them!  When the midnight Mass has ended they’ll eat pies and cakes and candies, fum, fum, fum!  (I love that carol.)
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#13
(12-08-2020, 02:50 PM)yablabo Wrote: I am simply not a trad.

Then what draws you to a forum that's about traditional Catholicism?

(12-08-2020, 02:50 PM)yablabo Wrote: Some people love to keep the traditions like the ancient fasts/days of abstinence alive, and good on them!

So by not keeping to the ancient traditions, what benefit do you feel you are doing for yourself and the Church?  I'm not attacking.  I'm just genuinely curious.
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#14
(12-08-2020, 04:22 PM)NSMSSS Wrote:
(12-08-2020, 02:50 PM)yablabo Wrote: I am simply not a trad.

Then what draws you to a forum that's about traditional Catholicism?

(12-08-2020, 02:50 PM)yablabo Wrote: Some people love to keep the traditions like the ancient fasts/days of abstinence alive, and good on them!

So by not keeping to the ancient traditions, what benefit do you feel you are doing for yourself and the Church?  I'm not attacking.  I'm just genuinely curious.
 As for what draws me here, I’ve been around since 2009.  Originally it was the chat room and discussions on ecumenical councils.  Now it’s an affable group of posters that post and discuss interesting topics.

When talking of “traditions” you’ll find the topic varied based upon culture.  I simply am not a “trad” in the sense of following pre-Vatican II American-flavor catholicism.  I’m an ultra-montanist if anything.  I don’t “feel” any benefit whatsoever.
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#15
I get a little disheartened when people no longer want to follow tradition.  I feel like we shouldn't do the bare minimum just because it's all we are required to do, and there's beauty and wisdom to be gained in trying to accomplish things that are a little difficult.  That is why people drive themselves crazy with 12 dishes, and keeping carp alive in the bathtub, and sending someone outside to put the baby Jesus in the manger when the first star is out.  If we decide to forget all these things just because they don't make us "feel" anything, we've lost a great deal of our inheritance.

To get the train back on the tracks for this topic, I could order a pizza and crab Rangoons and technically fulfill the Christmas Eve tradition.  Where's the richness in that, though?  I'd lose just about all the symbolism and I'd definitely lose any connection to the past.
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#16
(12-08-2020, 11:34 PM)Pandora Wrote: I get a little disheartened when people no longer want to follow tradition.  I feel like we shouldn't do the bare minimum just because it's all we are required to do, and there's beauty and wisdom to be gained in trying to accomplish things that are a little difficult.  That is why people drive themselves crazy with 12 dishes, and keeping carp alive in the bathtub, and sending someone outside to put the baby Jesus in the manger when the first star is out.  If we decide to forget all these things just because they don't make us "feel" anything, we've lost a great deal of our inheritance.

To get the train back on the tracks for this topic, I could order a pizza and crab Rangoons and technically fulfill the Christmas Eve tradition.  Where's the richness in that, though?  I'd lose just about all the symbolism and I'd definitely lose any connection to the past.

You can’t expect everyone to follow Eastern European, Italian, German, French or Irish catholic customs.  Not everyone belonged to those traditions prior to Vatican II, either.  If you like to keep the customs of your ancestors, that is laudable.  I do the same with mine.  However, the things which were law that are no longer, are also no longer universal customs.
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#17
(12-09-2020, 11:01 AM)yablabo Wrote:
(12-08-2020, 11:34 PM)Pandora Wrote: I get a little disheartened when people no longer want to follow tradition.  I feel like we shouldn't do the bare minimum just because it's all we are required to do, and there's beauty and wisdom to be gained in trying to accomplish things that are a little difficult.  That is why people drive themselves crazy with 12 dishes, and keeping carp alive in the bathtub, and sending someone outside to put the baby Jesus in the manger when the first star is out.  If we decide to forget all these things just because they don't make us "feel" anything, we've lost a great deal of our inheritance.

To get the train back on the tracks for this topic, I could order a pizza and crab Rangoons and technically fulfill the Christmas Eve tradition.  Where's the richness in that, though?  I'd lose just about all the symbolism and I'd definitely lose any connection to the past.

You can’t expect everyone to follow Eastern European, Italian, German, French or Irish catholic customs.  Not everyone belonged to those traditions prior to Vatican II, either.  If you like to keep the customs of your ancestors, that is laudable.  I do the same with mine.  However, the things which were law that are no longer, are also no longer universal customs.

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#18
This is the best recipe I’ve found for pignoli cookies. It hasn’t been on the Lidia website for years...
I add salt, not sure why it’s not in the recipe.

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/membe...s-53011581

Also, there is apparently some gene that non-Asian people have, that when they eat Chinese pine nuts, they taste metal for a week. Needless to say, I discovered this the hard way. So, don’t cheap out and just splurge on Italian pignoli, or use sliced almonds if your budget doesn’t permit.
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#19
(12-07-2020, 10:25 PM)Pandora Wrote:
(12-07-2020, 10:08 PM)Elle19 Wrote: How do you do all this?!

I guess find a way to do it because it's what my family's always done, but don't think I won't get started the Monday before Christmas Eve.  There's something especially beautiful about keeping tradition alive, even when it's difficult to accomplish a task.

In a practical sense, the soups have to be made at least one day ahead anyway, and some things can be 90% finished and parked in the fridge without any deterioration in quality. I might even make the desserts over the next two weekends and freeze them.

I really want to bring these sorts of things back. I’ve been collecting liturgical living books, and we’ve been benefiting SO MUCH from them! But no one taught us how to do any of this stuff. My husband, for example, was raised Catholic, but was never even taught how to say grace before meals, and my mother used to serve meat on Christmas Eve *facepalm* so we have had a long road behind us to even get where we are and an even longer road to go!!! Restoring Tradition is very important, and traditional food is incredibly important in bringing back Tradition. (Capitalization emphasis involved bouncing between threads, mea culpa!)

But because no one ever taught me how to do this, sometimes I think I need a checklist hahahaha
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#20
(12-09-2020, 03:32 PM)Elle19 Wrote: I really want to bring these sorts of things back. I’ve been collecting liturgical living books, and we’ve been benefiting SO MUCH from them! But no one taught us how to do any of this stuff. My husband, for example, was raised Catholic, but was never even taught how to say grace before meals, and my mother used to serve meat on Christmas Eve *facepalm* so we have had a long road behind us to even get where we are and an even longer road to go!!! Restoring Tradition is very important, and traditional food is incredibly important in bringing back Tradition. (Capitalization emphasis involved bouncing between threads, mea culpa!)

But because no one ever taught me how to do this, sometimes I think I need a checklist hahahaha

Which kind of Christmas Eve are you doing?  Any ideas in particular?

If you’re doing Polish, or any Slavic insofar as I am aware, you also need to get oplatki.  I think you can still order them in time for Christmas from religious stores.  Here’s an Amazon link, but they are way overpriced.  They usually aren’t more than $2 or $3 for a nice set like this.

https://www.amazon.com/Traditional-Oplatki-Christmas-Wafers-Envelope/dp/B00H9YI0WA/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=Oplatki&qid=1607547652&sr=8-4

PS: As a child, I always had to have the pink one because it was pink.  The pink one is supposed to be for the farm animals (or the dog if you don’t live on a farm).
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