What's a good way to learn Linux?
#1
For me, I learn best by doing. When I got my first Windows computer back in the early 90s, I had to figure it out to do the stuff I wanted to do. I'd like to get a good foothold with Linux, but anymore, I'm not sure how I would learn it. I could install it on computer, but since I don't need to do anything personal with it, I wouldn't have a reason to use it so it would just sit there.
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#2
Why wouldn't you need to do anything personal with it?  Looking at it that way makes it a novelty rather than a tool.

I would suggest installing it on a computer, and then using it for your day to day.  Jump back and forth between it and Windows as you feel necessary, but don't give into the temptation to switch away any time there's something you don't understand, and instead embrace that as the chance to learn Linux just as you're desiring.

I started with Unix over 15 years ago as a teenager, and then around a decade ago switched fully to Linux and have never used Windows since then.  It took time to learn and get comfortable with it, but looking back, it was definitely worth it -- especially since it landed me a very good job later on in life.

Try out starting with something like Linux Mint.  It's a great platform which supports most everything you ever might wish to do (web browsing, document editing, etc.) and is designed to be reasonably intuitive to a person from a Windows background.  https://linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=288
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#3
It's just that the only thing I use a computer for anymore is pretty much web browsing. Sure, I can launch a web browser from the GUI Linux interface, but that won't really help me learn the core of the OS and its command structure.
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#4
Well, command line basics are always going to be helpful. This looks like a decent article on the basics.

https://linuxconfig.org/bash-scripting-t...-beginners

In terms of actually learning the ins and outs of the OS, it might be worth playing around with an extra computer you don't care about. I've also heard that small project computers like Raspberry Pi's are good for learning how to write custom drivers, but I can't remember where I saw that, so don't take my word for it.
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#5
What is linux?
"If we do not supply the chains, who will chain the supplies?"

Karl Marx I PROMISE it will work this time Vol 3


"Mein Fuhrer, I can walk!"

A German...possibly
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#6
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
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#7
(08-11-2021, 02:43 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
what is a root folder? and what is c:,D:, drives

and what is source code?
"If we do not supply the chains, who will chain the supplies?"

Karl Marx I PROMISE it will work this time Vol 3


"Mein Fuhrer, I can walk!"

A German...possibly
Reply
#8
(08-11-2021, 02:46 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:43 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
what is a root folder? and what is c:,D:, drives

and what is source code?

The source code is the set of instructions that makes the computer actually usable, to perform functions like displaying graphics, performing calculations, processing text, etc.

The root folder is just that--the root of where all files and programs are stored. In Windows, each hard drive/partition will have a letter assigned to it, totally separate from other letters. Most Windows users by default have everything stored in the C: folder, but many people, like me, have added an additional hard drive to my computer, which gives me a D: folder. Other devices like USB sticks or disk drives would also show up as a letter, like G:,E:, etc. Likewise, in Linux, everything is contained in *one* root folder, and every storage location is derivative of that.

Linus Tech Tips has some good videos on tech basics.

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#9
(08-11-2021, 02:51 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:46 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:43 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
what is a root folder? and what is c:,D:, drives

and what is source code?

The source code is the set of instructions that makes the computer actually usable, to perform functions like displaying graphics, performing calculations, processing text, etc.

The root folder is just that--the root of where all files and programs are stored. In Windows, each hard drive/partition will have a letter assigned to it, totally separate from other letters. Most Windows users by default have everything stored in the C: folder, but many people, like me, have added an additional hard drive to my computer, which gives me a D: folder. Other devices like USB sticks or disk drives would also show up as a letter, like G:,E:, etc. Likewise, in Linux, everything is contained in *one* root folder, and every storage location is derivative of that.

Linus Tech Tips has some good videos on tech basics.

I do not understand what the blimey he is talking about? it is all bizarre jargon. this tech stuff, and I still do not understand the point of folders.
"If we do not supply the chains, who will chain the supplies?"

Karl Marx I PROMISE it will work this time Vol 3


"Mein Fuhrer, I can walk!"

A German...possibly
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#10
(08-11-2021, 02:57 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:51 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:46 PM)Anon777 Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:43 PM)Orthodox Andy Wrote:
(08-11-2021, 02:35 PM)Anon777 Wrote: What is linux?

It's an operating system, like Windows or MacOS. In the 1960s, engineers at Bell Labs created UNIX, which was a computer operating system. In the 1990s, a college student in Finland, Linus Torvalds created his own operating system called Linux, which is based off of UNIX. It performs a lot of the same functions as any operating system, with some key differences:

-The source code is open for anyone to view and modify.

-Being the administrator is not the default mode in Linux. Hence every change to the computer has to be explicitly authorized by the user.

-There is one root folder in Linux, as opposed to the C:, D:, etc drives in Windows.

I'm not a Linux expert, so those are just a few of the differences that I remember. If I got something wrong on here, please feel free to correct me, Linux regulars.
what is a root folder? and what is c:,D:, drives

and what is source code?

The source code is the set of instructions that makes the computer actually usable, to perform functions like displaying graphics, performing calculations, processing text, etc.

The root folder is just that--the root of where all files and programs are stored. In Windows, each hard drive/partition will have a letter assigned to it, totally separate from other letters. Most Windows users by default have everything stored in the C: folder, but many people, like me, have added an additional hard drive to my computer, which gives me a D: folder. Other devices like USB sticks or disk drives would also show up as a letter, like G:,E:, etc. Likewise, in Linux, everything is contained in *one* root folder, and every storage location is derivative of that.

Linus Tech Tips has some good videos on tech basics.

I do not understand what the blimey he is talking about? it is all bizarre jargon.
I am 24 years old but am techwise (Almost) completely illiterate. I STILL DO NOT understand why people like smartphones so freaking much. I hate touchscreens and always have. I do not understand have of what the button on my keyboard do or for
"If we do not supply the chains, who will chain the supplies?"

Karl Marx I PROMISE it will work this time Vol 3


"Mein Fuhrer, I can walk!"

A German...possibly
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