Divine Mercy Sunday
#11
(03-29-2010, 07:33 PM)mike6240 Wrote: Hmm...interesting, although I will be celebrating the Octave of Easter on this day ( Dominica in Albis ).

So will everyone else who attends Mass that day. The Octave day of Easter (or Low Sunday, or my favourite term, Quasimodo Sunday) is still the official liturgical designation. Divine Mercy Sunday is a para-liturgical one, although as an idea, it does tie in very well with the liturgical. If the pro-Faustinian faction is correct (I don't have an opinion either way), then the Feast of Mercy was an ancient observance on the Sunday after Easter. And if that's true, Saint Faustina heralded a restoration of that observance.

Quote:The modern Divine Mercy devotion is just not my cup of tea.  Now the Sacred Heart devotion - that would be the essence of divine mercy to me.

The Sacred Heart's only been in the general calendar since 1856. I don't know if it's traditional enough for me yet.  ;)
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#12
The problem with this devotion is the image of the radiant and penetrating grace, which is one sided, and shadows the necessity of our cooperation to our cross and follow Jesus.

The truth is always between two extremes, and anything one sided is deceiving.
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#13
(03-29-2010, 10:24 PM)karyn_anne Wrote: I don't know why some trads are completely against the Divine Mercy devotion to the point that they oppose its practice altogether. My take on this is that in it was quite orthodox in its original meaning in the 1930s but it seems to have overtaken devotion to the rosary and the Sacred Heart in many Novus Ordo parishes, and that no one cares for the justice of God nowadays

A lot of trads are against the Divine Mercy devotion for a few reasons:
1.  The seeming replacement of the Octave Sunday of Easter with a Sunday celebration dictated by a private revelation
2.  St. Faustina's diary used to be on the Index of Forbidden Books
3.  The devotion was promulgated by JPII so it has a "guilt by association" impression attached to it.

If you ask a lot of trads, this is why many do not participate in the Divine Mercy devotion.

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#14
The intrusion of Divine Mercy Sunday over Low Sunday is hardly traditional. It has no basis in the traditional liturgy. It was suppressed until 1978 when it was instituted by the newly elected JPII. Her supposed visions, private revelations at best, were in the 1930's. Just because it was pre-VII does not make it 'traditional'. Modernism was pre-VII also, folks....

The Octave Day of a feast, particularly of the greatest feast, Easter, is a significant day in itself.  The Divine Mercy cult is thus in contravention of the focus of the Catholic liturgy for that day, which is on the Resurrection of Our Lord and faith in His Divinity.  As Dom Gueranger, the noted Benedictine liturgical scholar, commented in his fifteen-volume Liturgical Year:  "Such is the solemnity of this Sunday that not only is it of greater double rite, but no feast, however great, can ever be kept upon it."  That is the Roman Catholic attitude, which the New Order, surprise surprise, spurned.

I thought this was a traditional Catholic forum.
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#15
(03-30-2010, 11:11 AM)cunctas_haereses Wrote: The intrusion of Divine Mercy Sunday over Low Sunday is hardly traditional. It has no basis in the traditional liturgy. It was suppressed until 1978 when it was instituted by the newly elected JPII. Her supposed visions, private revelations at best, were in the 1930's. Just because it was pre-VII does not make it 'traditional'. Modernism was pre-VII also, folks....

The Octave Day of a feast, particularly of the greatest feast, Easter, is a significant day in itself.  The Divine Mercy cult is thus in contravention of the focus of the Catholic liturgy for that day, which is on the Resurrection of Our Lord and faith in His Divinity.  As Dom Gueranger, the noted Benedictine liturgical scholar, commented in his fifteen-volume Liturgical Year:  "Such is the solemnity of this Sunday that not only is it of greater double rite, but no feast, however great, can ever be kept upon it."  That is the Roman Catholic attitude, which the New Order, surprise surprise, spurned.

I thought this was a traditional Catholic forum.

The bottom line is Holy Mother Church grants a plenary indulgence for this day for the method proscribed above. I would rather get that indulgence and maybe cut down or eliminate my time in purgatory then worry about which Pope instituted this devotion.

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#16
Right. Gain the indulgence. Who cares who instituted it. Anyway, Jesus institutes all indulgences, He uses different people and method's to distribute them, thats all. Arguing about this is like arguing about who grew an orange before you eat it. Doesn't matter; it will taste the same.
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#17
(03-30-2010, 11:11 AM)cunctas_haereses Wrote: The Octave Day of a feast, particularly of the greatest feast, Easter, is a significant day in itself.  The Divine Mercy cult is thus in contravention of the focus of the Catholic liturgy for that day, which is on the Resurrection of Our Lord and faith in His Divinity.  As Dom Gueranger, the noted Benedictine liturgical scholar, commented in his fifteen-volume Liturgical Year:  "Such is the solemnity of this Sunday that not only is it of greater double rite, but no feast, however great, can ever be kept upon it."  That is the Roman Catholic attitude, which the New Order, surprise surprise, spurned.

The Octave of Easter is still the Octave of Easter. The readings at Mass are the same as always. Nothing has been changed. Divine Mercy devotions are extra-liturgical, celebrated outside the Mass. But the theme of Divine Mercy is perfectly in keeping with the solemn eight days - as St. Augustine called these eight days "the days of mercy and pardon" (#156, Dominica in Albis) and the Sunday after Easter "the compendium of the days of mercy."

Dom Gueranger might be a wonderful scholar, but he's not the Pope..  and the Pope approved the feast of Divine Mercy. You don't have to celebrate it, but it's pretty brazen of you to denounce what the Church has approved. 
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#18
(03-30-2010, 11:11 AM)cunctas_haereses Wrote: I thought this was a traditional Catholic forum.

It is... and this traditional Catholic website's owner created a page on Divine Mercy.

http://www.fisheaters.com/divinemercy.html
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#19
I never got the hatred of trads towards the Divine Mercy devotion its (as Strict Catholic Girl says) extra liturgical. I never hear it mentioned at my Masses anyway. I dont see how its not traditional it was given to St Faustina in the 1930's.
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#20
(03-30-2010, 04:29 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: The Sacred Heart's only been in the general calendar since 1856. I don't know if it's traditional enough for me yet.  ;)
:laughing:

Personaly I accept no devotion Post 1200. ;)
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