Divine Mercy Sunday
#71
Funny I've always preferred this image of the Divine Mercy:
[Image: Divine+Mercy+Portrait.jpg]

I like the Blue in contrast with the Red Ray.

ps. I don't know how to make this smaller  :-[
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#72
Ecclus: 35:26 The mercy of God is beautiful in the time of affliction, as a cloud of rain in the time of drought.

:)
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#73
(04-11-2010, 10:22 PM)Spooky Wrote: Funny I've always preferred this image of the Divine Mercy:
[Image: Divine+Mercy+Portrait.jpg]

I like the Blue in contrast with the Red Ray.

ps. I don't know how to make this smaller  :-[



No need Its perfect. I have this one too.
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#74
those who would like a print of the original Divine Mercy image, as Lisa showed in her post of three images, can get it at the URL below, as a framed print ($15.95), a free print (though they'd like you to send $1 if you can), inexpensive holy cards, leaflets, etc.  also t shirts and posters for parishes.  they only carry the original image.

http://www.divinemercysundayusa.com/shopping.shtml

this site maintains, in accordance with the criticisms that Sister Faustina's spiritual director made about the images painted after her death, that the original image is the one true image of the Divine Mercy. you'll have to make up your own minds about that.  Fr. Sopocko actually posed in an alb and cincture to help the artist get the image the way Sr. Faustina insisted it should be.  i never heard of  a spiritual director being an artist's model before, thought that was kind of amusing.


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#75
Compare the Our Father bead of the chaplet with this from Fatima:

I offer you the most precious Body and Blood, soul and Divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, present in all the tabernacles of the world, in reparation for all the outrages committed against it.

Seems like the chaplet is legitimate.  I doubt Sr. Faustina was aware of this prayer at that time.
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#76
It's nice to see some other people have a really hard time with the rosary.  I still to this day do not understand how one focuses on the mysteries and the prayers at the same time.  I always end up feeling like I'm playing with a chinese finger trap for my mind. 

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#77
(04-12-2010, 12:59 AM)James02 Wrote: Compare the Our Father bead of the chaplet with this from Fatima:

I offer you the most precious Body and Blood, soul and Divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, present in all the tabernacles of the world, in reparation for all the outrages committed against it.

Seems like the chaplet is legitimate.  I doubt Sr. Faustina was aware of this prayer at that time.


hold on now.  the Fatima apparitions were in 1917. 

"In 1934, Saint Faustina was told by her confessor, Fr. Sopocko, to write everything in a diary of her interior experiences with Jesus. Fr Sopocko did not have the time to listen to these lengthy confessions of Saint Faustina."  (from the site mentioned in my previous post)

why would Sr. Faustina not be aware of the Fatima prayers from 1917 by 1934? 

she would surely have been aware of this prayer of St. Gertrude the Great (11th-12th century), which is said on the small beads in the Chaplet of St. Gertrude: 

"Eternal Father, I offer Thee the Most Precious Blood Of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory, for sinners everywhere, for sinners in the Universal Church, those in my own home and within my own family. Amen."

this is the prayer you mention from the Our Father bead in the Divine Mercy chaplet: 

"Eternal Father, I offer you the body and blood, soul and divinity of your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world; for the sake of His sorrowful passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world."

this is the prayer said on the first Pater of the Sacred Heart Chaplet:

"O Eternal Father, I offer Thee the Blood, Passion and death of Our Lord Jesus Christ and the sorrows of Our Blessed Lady and St. Joseph in reparation for my sins, in suffrage for the souls in Purgatory, for the wants of our Holy Church, and for the conversion of sinners."

the popes who suppressed the Divine Mercy devotion and Sr. Faustina's diary thought it was too similar to other devotions, particularly the Sacred Heart devotion, which dates back to the 11th or 12th century, and was established by St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Doctor of the Church, and St. Gertrude.  In the latter half of the seventeenth century that news of three private revelations to St. Margaret Mary Alocoque concerning the Sacred Heart swept the Catholic world and shortly led to the establishment of a feast on the Friday after the Octave of Corpus Christi (the Friday after the Second Sunday after Pentecost).  The Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, which was extended to the Universal Church by Pope Pius IX in 1856, became a feast of atonement for
human ingratitude toward God in spite of the supreme sacrifice of Calvary.  The theme for the new Mass and the Divine Office was taken from the words of Our Lord to St. Margaret Mary:  "Behold the Heart which has loved men so greatly, but which has been given so little love in return."


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#78
[Image: DivineMercy1.jpg]
This is the same image I have at home and I also like it best because of the combination of the DM and SHJ, as others have said.
I also like this image, it reminds me of images of Our Lord and St. Margaret, plus I like that he has a better halo.
[Image: dm1i.jpg]
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#79
(04-12-2010, 01:37 AM)Walty Wrote: It's nice to see some other people have a really hard time with the rosary.  I still to this day do not understand how one focuses on the mysteries and the prayers at the same time.  I always end up feeling like I'm playing with a chinese finger trap for my mind. 

Maybe its "cheating," but I tend to use meditations from saints and the such and then pair them with the prayers.

This site, http://www.montfort.org.uk/Writings/MFTE...tml#Fourth, and "From the Rose Garden of Our Lady" helped me a lot. Not that I'm a "good rosary prayer" by any means.
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#80
(03-31-2010, 01:17 AM)QuisUtDeus Wrote:
(03-30-2010, 11:04 AM)amasimp Wrote: A lot of trads are against the Divine Mercy devotion for a few reasons:

I'm not attributing these to you, but I think a few of those reasons are goofy:

Quote:1.  The seeming replacement of the Octave Sunday of Easter with a Sunday celebration dictated by a private revelation

This one is the only compelling one.  But, it is not insurmountable.  The Church dictates holy days, days of obligation, etc.  It is within her capacity to add anything at any time, and she certainly has.  It certainly makes one wonder about the veracity of the revelation, but it's not like it's a sign of the Antichrist for the Church to change the liturgical calendar even during Easter; it's happened in history.  What's different is that this is a private revelation that could conflict with the traditional and rightful honor given to Easter.  But, it doesn't have to.  It could be folded into the Paschal Celebration eventually as honoring the Mercy of Christ given to us via His Sacrifice on the Cross.

Quote:2.  St. Faustina's diary used to be on the Index of Forbidden Books

So was poem of the Man-God which was recommended by the SSPX at one point.  Also, St. Joan of Arc was once an heretic.  The index and excommunication are not infallible.   Popes can add and remove books and also adjudicate and remit excommunications as they see fit and it is temporally binding even if it is incorrect.  When they say it is out, it is out.  When they say it is OK, it is OK at least in the general sense.  Of course, we shouldn't commit sins against conscience if we think something to be wrong; but at the same time, we should be really careful if we want to convince others it is wrong.

Quote:3.  The devotion was promulgated by JPII so it has a "guilt by association" impression attached to it.

That's just contrarianism.  JP2 also said no women priests, so from "guilt by association" all trads should join womynpriests.

And there's nothing for anyone to be against anyhow.  It was a private revelation and not binding.  If one doesn't believe, well, OK.  'nuff said.  I won't argue for them to believe.  I won't even argue for someone to believe in Fatima, and I believe wholeheartedly in that.  I'll just put the information in front of them and ask them to consider it.

In your third point you are not being intellectually honest.  The original quote about guilt by association doesn't mean "if JPII says X, then Y is true" - it means "If JPII says X, then we must check it against tradition".    Women priests does not hold up against tradition.
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