Why the Bishops hate Latin
#1
Why the Bishops hate Latin
I know it may sound strange to begin my second post with such a title, but a little squabble recently with a seminarian has proven to me (again) that, contrary to the express admonitions of the current Code of Canon Law, most bishops do not want their priests to know Latin. But first let us consider what the Church specifically dictates regarding the matter:

Can. 249 - Institutionis sacerdotalis Ratione provideatur ut alumni non tantum accurate linguam patriam edoceantur, sed etiam linguam Latinam bene calleant necnon congruam habeant cognitionem alienarum linguarum, quarum scientia ad eorum formationem aut ad ministerium pastorale exercendum necessaria aut utilis videatur.

My translation: In the program of priestly formation let provision be made that the students [i.e. seminarians] not only be carefully and thoroughly taught their native language, but also know well and by experience the Latin language; let them also have a suitable knowledge of those foreign languages, knowledge of which seems necessary or useful for their formation or for carrying out the pastoral ministry.


http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2010...riest.html
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#2
Well, I think the Novus Ordo bishops are just trying to keep the future papal pool very small and stocked with their own fish, besides the fact that they are intellectually lazy.
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#3
Little Rose, you are 100% correct on that statement. Not only are the NO Bishops "lazy" but so are MOST priests. There are exceptions but they are few and far between. Our local NO priests have back away from guitars at Mass until recently. As soon as the Traditionalists quiet down and things seem to be headed in a good direction, out comes the guitars again and the 1970-80 music.
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#4
After reading the book "Diary of a Country Priest" I have to say priests today have it easy. Even if this book was fiction it pretty accurately depicted the life of a priest in the late 1800s. This priest was dying of cancer (although he didn't know it at the time) but he was sick and he would walk miles and miles to take care of his flock. Towards the end, he was so bad that he passed out on a parishioners doorstep. He was very worried because he liked his wine and he was worried that the family would see him passed out and smell the alcohol on his breath and he would cause scandal.

Also this priest was being calumniated against by this girl because he was simply trying to save her soul.

But the point is priests back in the "good old days" didn't have days off, they didn't go on vacations, they were priests all the time and they were there for their flock.

Now you can't even get priests to go and give people the sacrament of Extreme Unction.

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#5
(04-19-2010, 10:55 AM)littlerose Wrote: Well, I think the Novus Ordo bishops are just trying to keep the future papal pool very small and stocked with their own fish, besides the fact that they are intellectually lazy.

I do agree. Combine that with the fact that many bishops are just sixties radical wannabes in sheep's clothing (all ours can ever talk about is championing illegal immigration)  and I can see how the Nervous Ordeal became the mess it is. ???
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#6
Too many bishops are like this, but His Holiness is changing that. Every new bishop he has promoted to more influential positions tends to be pro-Latin, or at the very least not discouraging about it. My bishop actually, although not knowing it by heart, obviously understood Latin well enough to sound like he did when he read it out.
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#7
Do bishops hate Latin?

Petertherock Wrote:But the point is priests back in the "good old days" didn't have days off, they didn't go on vacations, they were priests all the time and they were there for their flock.

Are you saying priests should not have time off? For heaven's sakes, man, they're not God. Men need a break.
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#8
(04-19-2010, 05:14 PM)Credo Wrote: Do bishops hate Latin?

For liturgical purposes, yes, most of them do.

Quote:
Petertherock Wrote:But the point is priests back in the "good old days" didn't have days off, they didn't go on vacations, they were priests all the time and they were there for their flock.

Are you saying priests should not have time off? For heaven's sakes, man, they're not God. Men need a break.

This sounds like a romanticism based on reading too many saints' lives or something. The average secular priest in the "good old days" (assuming pre-20th century) who wasn't a missionary or in a church all by himself most likely had days off, and in fact didn't have all that much to do. The clergy was considered an idle class and complained about by upstart peasants for not having to do any real work. On the bright side, it allowed many priests to become authors or musicians, like Antonio Vivaldi.
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#9
A Golden Fishie pinned to SLCFranciscan's beret for "Nervous Ordeal"!  :laughing:
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#10
I believe the reason is much easier: most seminarians are old, over 30 years old, and they have enough problem to learn in their native language, instead of learning other languages.

I remember from my seminary days, how much slower the older guys learned, than we in our late ten or early 20 age.
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