augstine baker
#21
(11-07-2010, 10:02 PM)paragon Wrote: I don't even know what a nominative is, but you will find 'fora' in any decent English dictionary.   :fish:

You'll find a lot of things in the dictionary, including errors and slang.
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#22
(11-07-2010, 09:59 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The nominative is never used after prepositions.

I think the point was that he was still speaking in English, but using the Latin version of the plural. "Fora", while being derived from Latin, is an English word, and therefore not subject to the same rules to which it would be subject if he were actually using it in Latin.
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#23
(11-07-2010, 10:12 PM)Gladium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 09:59 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The nominative is never used after prepositions.

I think the point was that he was still speaking in English, but using the Latin version of the plural. "Fora", while being derived from Latin, is an English word, and therefore not subject to the same rules to which it would be subject if he were actually using it in Latin.

Fora is not derived from Latin; it is Latin.

You are right "forum" is an English word and not subject to the rules of Latin, which is why the plural is "forums".
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#24
(11-07-2010, 10:16 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:12 PM)Gladium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 09:59 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The nominative is never used after prepositions.

I think the point was that he was still speaking in English, but using the Latin version of the plural. "Fora", while being derived from Latin, is an English word, and therefore not subject to the same rules to which it would be subject if he were actually using it in Latin.

Fora is not derived from Latin; it is Latin.

You are right "forum" is an English word and not subject to the rules of Latin, which is why the plural is "forums".

One could say also that "forum" is not derived from Latin, but it is Latin, and therefore only Latin plurals and declensions should ever be used. At what point does a derivation become a word in the language deriving it?
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#25
:popcorn:
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#26
(11-07-2010, 09:59 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 09:54 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 09:50 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 09:20 PM)paragon Wrote: Or since he appears to be on other fora - perhaps the first one he signed up to had a character limit.  ???

In Latin, forīs. In English, forums.

The (nominative) plural of forum in Latin is fora. Foris is the dative and ablative plural.

In English, there are two correct plurals: "forums" and "fora". The plural "forums" seems to be more widespread but "fora" is perfectly acceptable, as far as I know.

The nominative is never used after prepositions.

I thought you were talking about the plural of "forum" in English and both plurals ("forums"; "fora") are possible. In Latin, you don't use the nominative after prepositions, I know.

Quote:Now, without looking, what is the plural of "octopus"?

Octopuses; octopi.
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#27
(11-07-2010, 10:23 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Octopuses; octopi.

I am fairly certain "octopi" is incorrect and, in its place, "octopodes" should be used.
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#28
(11-07-2010, 10:20 PM)Gladium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:16 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:12 PM)Gladium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 09:59 PM)Rosarium Wrote: The nominative is never used after prepositions.

I think the point was that he was still speaking in English, but using the Latin version of the plural. "Fora", while being derived from Latin, is an English word, and therefore not subject to the same rules to which it would be subject if he were actually using it in Latin.

Fora is not derived from Latin; it is Latin.

You are right "forum" is an English word and not subject to the rules of Latin, which is why the plural is "forums".

One could say also that "forum" is not derived from Latin, but it is Latin, and therefore only Latin plurals and declensions should ever be used. At what point does a derivation become a word in the language deriving it?

That is a good point. English uses many words which are directly from Latin words, often with the same spelling (since many were filtered through French, some spellings are different). The point being is that if a word of Latin origin is used in English, the English plural should be used or the proper Latin. Halfway just shows ignorance of both languages.

It is forums. If people with to use the Latin plural, then it sounds silly without using the proper case as well. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
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#29
(11-07-2010, 10:25 PM)Gladium Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 10:23 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Octopuses; octopi.

I am fairly certain "octopi" is incorrect and, in its place, "octopodes" should be used.

I'm assuming we are talking about English plurals. I believe that "octopi" is one of the accepted plurals of the word.

"Octopodes" would be a correct plural for Greek.
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#30
this thread is degnerating into somehting substantiial
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