The best thing to come out of the protestant revolt
#21
The abolition of slavery was largely (not exclusively) driven by Protestants and was very much based on their interpretation of the Bible.  In many respects, it was one of the most selfless movements in history, since its advocates did not stand to benefit financially. 
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#22
(11-07-2010, 07:56 PM)denise Wrote: The abolition of slavery was largely (not exclusively) driven by Protestants and was very much based on their interpretation of the Bible.  In many respects, it was one of the most selfless movements in history, since its advocates did not stand to benefit financially. 

Lol, anybody care to comment?
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#23
(11-07-2010, 07:56 PM)denise Wrote: The abolition of slavery was largely (not exclusively) driven by Protestants and was very much based on their interpretation of the Bible.  In many respects, it was one of the most selfless movements in history, since its advocates did not stand to benefit financially. 
Yes, such a selfless move to send all them poor Irish Catholics down below the Mason-Dixon to be gunned down in the front lines to end the competition of slave labor  in the south against their protestant owned sweatshops in the north.

I'm sure it would never have anything to do with money, perish the thought.
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#24
The movement actually achieved its first success in England - without the necessity of war - and led to the British Navy being used to halt the slave trade from Africa.  The response from Muslim slave traders by the way, was that which God had permitted, man could not forbid and to this day, Islam is ambiguous about slavery. 

The question here was what is the best thing that  came out of Protestantism.  My answer remains - the end of human slavery.  Given that slavery has existed in virtually every society and for much of human history this is an outstanding accomplishment.  It could not have emerged from Islam.  The movement developed in  Protestant circles.  The architects of that movement, both here and in England, did not stand to gain from the elimination of slavery and this movement remains one of the most remarkably selfless movements in history.  I believe Adam Hochschild wrote an excellent book exploring this  issue several years ago.

And there was very little competition from slave labor in the south with the factories of the north.  The industrial development of the south lagged far behind the north (one can argue that slavery contributed to this gap) which is one reason why southern victory was unlikely.  Slavery was rooted in southern agriculture, particularly cotton and tobacco,  labor intensive crops, neither of which could be profitably grown in the north.
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#25
Wednesday pot luck.


oh, did someone already say that?
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#26
Arguably...and this is going to start a WHOLE other discussion on Weber (and probably draw the distributists like flies)....but...Catholicism. 
:safe:
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#27
(11-07-2010, 01:44 AM)Scipio_a Wrote: Baptist Mega Fellowships and the events they put on...Car shows...Holloween  in the parking lot...and how can anyobne decry the Wednesday potluck....Wednesday potluck has got to be the best thing to come out of it all.

You forgot to mention hayrides.
[Image: hayride.jpg]
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#28
Those are a blast...and the new fangled modernist thing is "train" rides in the parking lot...kiddie sized trains....the megaship accross the street had one...it was broken when he got to it...bummer
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#29
(11-07-2010, 10:21 AM)Unum Sint Wrote:
(11-07-2010, 06:52 AM)dymphna17 Wrote:
(11-06-2010, 09:45 AM)Unum Sint Wrote:
(11-05-2010, 09:27 AM)Restituo Wrote: lol awesome. How did Welch's grape juice come out of the revolt? I love that stuff.

-Resituo

I thought everybody knew the story of Welch's grape juice since it is printed on most of their bottles.

The short summary is from wiki.

In 1864, the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church expressly recommended that "in all cases the pure juice of the grape be used in the celebration of the Lord's Supper."[7] In 1865, Welch relocated to Vineland, New Jersey, where a sister already resided. Then in 1869, Welch discovered a method of pasteurizing grape juice so that fermentation was stopped, and the drink was non-alcoholic. He persuaded local churches to adopt this non-alcoholic "wine" for communion services, calling it "Dr. Welch's Unfermented Wine."

i guess you can call it an eventual by product of the protestant revolt.

Interesting.  Juice as empty as their theology.  The two couldn't be better paired.

Are you saying Welch's grape juice is not delicious?

Not at all.  But for use in the Church, it comes up empty.  That's all.
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#30
Hug us and Squeeze us dear Lord Jesus VBS burlap, felt and glitter projects....someone had to invent this stuff so they could teach the NO "religious ed"  their technique.
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