Are there any Catholics from Europe here?
#21
(06-28-2011, 06:25 PM)Tony W. Wrote:
(06-27-2011, 06:52 PM)mistman Wrote: I was just curious about this. If so, have you ever been to the United States? What are your impressions (people, values, etc.)?

My own impression is that something is wrong here. It's hard to explain but I sense it. I'm trying to figure it out.

Hello everyone, I'm from the UK.  If you were to ask me specifically about the religious opinions of American Catholics, I would note how heavily influenced they seem to be by low church protestantism.  There seems to be a gravitational pull which constantly tugs American Catholics in that direction, both theologically and culturally.  Needless to say, however, all is not well in Europe.  In the UK there seems to be a similar gravitational pull towards mainstream Anglicanism and presbyterianism, which seems to manifest itself in a sort of 'why can't we just be more like them' attitude that many British Catholics appear to have.  In addition to all that there exists a pan-European view which sees protestantism as more intellectually and socially respectable - i.e. more attuned to the modern world, less 'medieval' and 'superstitious' etc.

Anyhow, this is just a few thoughts for my first post on this forum.

Oi, he's a bloody mank! get him!
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#22
Well, I'm from Belgium, and I haven't been to United States yet, but reading about it and watching the news gives me the impression that America is better off (except economically) than most of Europe.

I mean, there's still a healthy dose of nationalism, actually being proud of your flag and anthem, religion in general seems to still be very important, you actually have some orthodox seminaries. Surely, everything can't be perfect, but it does seam a lot better than my Belgium, for example. Our pro-life movement is small and easily ignorable, gay marriage and euthanasia were legalised without any problems (our previous king did lose his throne for a day because he refused to sign the abortion bill), the 'Christian' party walks in gay pride parades, ... The U.S. may not have a foundation in Catholicism, but it seems to be going pretty strong there. Here the remnants of the diocesan church are vandalised by ultra-modernist bishops, who chain FSSP and ICKSP to the capital city.
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#23
I'm doing some management consultancy at the moment for a US firm that are targetting the elective surgery market in the US and I am Googling the various players with turnover between $20m and $100 per year.  In effect I am doing what a financial analyst would do.

Gotta say, Americans are obsessed with their looks and hairlines and pop prescription drugs like crazy people.

The saddest thing I've come across is a business called www.hairclub.com they are a client of my client so I've had a couple of conference calls about their business model and essentially the greater part of their money is coming from American men in their early to mid 20s who are beginning to see their hair thin out.  Because Americans have grown up with a TV diet of "The Batchelor" and "The Swann" and news anchors and everyone on US TV is glammed up, these poor schmucks think that their life is over at 23 because they are thinning on top and go and glue a mat on their head and spend $99 per month on glue and other ancillaries, often way more on other treatments.  They are spending their disposal income on hair mats rather than dating women who couldn't give a rats about their hairline.

And even if the glue holds they are still a schmuck.  What woman is going to be happy with a man so weak that he is lead by his nose by the prevailing culture.

If you must have a beautiful wife, (and I can see the advantages).  Then why not just fly to Russia or Budapest (Hungarian women are gorgeous), teach at the local English school for a month, and have a bevy of English speaking beauties lining up to date you?  I am as bald as a billiard ball, and on the ugly side of average looking.  I started thinning at 24 and shaved it off at 25 and my Russian wife who is five years younger than me is absolutely sexy as hell even after 4 kids.  I met her in Piccadilly Circus, London and dated her drop-dead gorgeous blond flatmate (think Anna Kornikova) for 1 month before asking my wife out instead.  Eastern Europe is so full of lazy, poor, drunk men with bad teeth and bad breath that the last thing women worry about is their husband's hairline.

In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is King.
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#24
Love this rant from Bob Hoskins.  One of the greatest ever gangster movies.

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#25
(06-29-2011, 03:06 AM)Adelbrecht Wrote: Well, I'm from Belgium, and I haven't been to United States yet, but reading about it and watching the news gives me the impression that America is better off (except economically) than most of Europe.

I mean, there's still a healthy dose of nationalism, actually being proud of your flag and anthem, religion in general seems to still be very important, you actually have some orthodox seminaries. Surely, everything can't be perfect, but it does seam a lot better than my Belgium, for example. Our pro-life movement is small and easily ignorable, gay marriage and euthanasia were legalised without any problems (our previous king did lose his throne for a day because he refused to sign the abortion bill), the 'Christian' party walks in gay pride parades, ... The U.S. may not have a foundation in Catholicism, but it seems to be going pretty strong there. Here the remnants of the diocesan church are vandalised by ultra-modernist bishops, who chain FSSP and ICKSP to the capital city.

Hi Adelbrecht,

I take your post very seriously, and it makes sense given my perspective about the 'Low Countries' and their history of practicalilty and capitalism, which results in massive immigration and an abandonment of religion.  But my impression is that Europe was reorganized and reordered under the Marshall Plan after WWII, so it isn't really Europe anymore, but the United States Jr.

The nationalism and Christianity in the USA is much stronger than anywhere else in Europe, yet weaker...being warped in practice. The "nationalism" is a result of Judaic/Puritan exceptionalism and our Christianity is the same. Orthodox Jews also condemn abortion, so this doesn't prove a thing regarding American Christianity.
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#26
(06-28-2011, 08:52 PM)3Sanctus Wrote:
(06-28-2011, 06:25 PM)Tony W. Wrote: Anyhow, this is just a few thoughts for my first post on this forum.

Welcome to the forum, Tony!   :)

Thanks, 3Sanctus; nice to be here.
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#27
(06-29-2011, 12:57 AM)LausTibiChriste Wrote:
(06-28-2011, 06:25 PM)Tony W. Wrote:
(06-27-2011, 06:52 PM)mistman Wrote: I was just curious about this. If so, have you ever been to the United States? What are your impressions (people, values, etc.)?

My own impression is that something is wrong here. It's hard to explain but I sense it. I'm trying to figure it out.

Hello everyone, I'm from the UK.  If you were to ask me specifically about the religious opinions of American Catholics, I would note how heavily influenced they seem to be by low church protestantism.  There seems to be a gravitational pull which constantly tugs American Catholics in that direction, both theologically and culturally.  Needless to say, however, all is not well in Europe.  In the UK there seems to be a similar gravitational pull towards mainstream Anglicanism and presbyterianism, which seems to manifest itself in a sort of 'why can't we just be more like them' attitude that many British Catholics appear to have.  In addition to all that there exists a pan-European view which sees protestantism as more intellectually and socially respectable - i.e. more attuned to the modern world, less 'medieval' and 'superstitious' etc.

Anyhow, this is just a few thoughts for my first post on this forum.

Oi, he's a bloody mank! get him!

Hello, LausTibiChriste.  :laughing:
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#28
(06-28-2011, 09:17 AM)3Sanctus Wrote:
(06-27-2011, 09:39 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Last time I went to DC, I actually immediately felt more at home by seeing all the people in suits. In San Antonio, just wearing a dress shirt is considered overdressed, even if you're not wearing a tie to go with it.

Well, I can sympathize with this.  I tend to wear slacks/dress pants and a button-up shirt everywhere.  When I first started my current job I seem to remember a few jokes coming my way on casual Friday, when everyone else wears jeans.  I don't mind looking pimp - even if I'm the only one who thinks I do.   :laughing:

Quote:Now, Virginia is probably my second-favorite state after Texas due to all the friendly people I met there, but I'm not personally the sort of guy who wants a handshake and all that from a stranger. I only expect that at church. Which, strangely enough, I pretty much never get from people at Catholic churches.

I just like the feeling when someone tries to show genuine concern, caring, etc. for me and I try to do the same.  I always try to be friendly to the janitors and security people in my office building.  Most of the janitors seem to think I'm crazy or something, but one of them and two of the security guards seem to perk up every time I say "hi".  That's the sort of interaction I like - feeling like a person and not just another number, if you will.

I'd like it if more people were like 3Sanctus.
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