Sanctus Candle.
#11
It's a beautiful custom that should be present in every parish, IMHO. However, do recall that the Sanctus Candle is used only for Low Masses, whereas the equivalent for a High Mass (Solemn) or Missa Cantata is the use of torchbearers.

[Image: 14_torchbearers.jpg?w=500&h=333]
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#12
My understanding is that a candle is to be lighted whenever the Blessed Sacrament is outside of the tabernacle.  From my ICRSS oratory, I was trained to light it right after the Sanctus, and extinguish it when the tabernacle is closed after distribution of Holy Communion.  This is roughly the same timing as when the torchbearers are present during a High Mass.  As Scriptorium said, though: rubrically, it's a matter of custom.  http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/200...nctus.html

In the Dominican Use, depending on the rank of the feast, there may be one to three Sanctus candle lighted on each side of the altar.  At a private Mass, there is still only one in the Epistle side.  http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/201...hting.html  Further, an altar server accompanies the priest with a lighted candle when distributing Holy Communion.

(08-08-2011, 05:14 PM)dan hunter Wrote: I was told by an FSSP priest that I used to serve for that it was lit at the Preface.
He told me the Preface was originally part of the Sanctus.

You will see in the missal that the Sanctus is written out after every Preface. :)  It's not written out either at the beginning of the Canon, or in the Ordinary. (The Ordo Missae says to recite it, but doesn't have it written out in full.)

Edited.
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#13
We have multiple candles. We have one candle that is lit right after the Sanctus, and then we have servers which also hold candles while communion is bring dispensed. The whole thing is great in my opinion and adds to the solemnity.
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#14
(08-08-2011, 07:13 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: We have multiple candles. We have one candle that is lit right after the Sanctus, and then we have servers which also hold candles while communion is bring dispensed. The whole thing is great in my opinion and adds to the solemnity.

Is this the Roman Use?  I've always wondered if servers could accompany the priest whilst he is distributing communion in the EF, and I think it is great as well, but would never "innovate" and suggest doing it without a solid backing in tradition or the rubrics!
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#15
The Sanctus candle is used during the Dominican Rite Mass. I must admit I haven't seen it used in the Roman Rite, yet.
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#16
Our general practice is to have a candle lit, which is fixed on the wall above the credence table on the Epistle side. In addition to this candle, if it is Low Mass with two servers, then one is with the priest with the plate while communion is being dispenses, and the other is with them holding a candle. If there are more than two servers, there are two on each side of the communion rail with candles facing each other. In any kind of sung Mass, we have something close to what the picture above has. It is the Roman Mass. It actually was not a custom of our church for years, but our priest brought it in. I don't know his reasoning beyond greater reverence toward the sacrament, but I know he loves to take advantage of any bells and whistles available, and he has a deep knowledge of the history of the Mass and its rubrics.

On a side note, I've seen the candle lit at a Benedictine Mass as well. It was usually lit right before the Preface, on a small stand like you'd see in A Christmas Carol or something, and kept lit until the ablutions. They also had the ritual of servers holding candles, but the ritual was a little different. Same spirit, though.
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#17
(08-08-2011, 09:55 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: Our general practice is to have a candle lit, which is fixed on the wall above the credence table on the Epistle side. In addition to this candle, if it is Low Mass with two servers, then one is with the priest with the plate while communion is being dispenses, and the other is with them holding a candle. If there are more than two servers, there are two on each side of the communion rail with candles facing each other. In any kind of sung Mass, we have something close to what the picture above has. It is the Roman Mass. It actually was not a custom of our church for years, but our priest brought it in. I don't know his reasoning beyond greater reverence toward the sacrament, but I know he loves to take advantage of any bells and whistles available, and he has a deep knowledge of the history of the Mass and its rubrics.

On a side note, I've seen the candle lit at a Benedictine Mass as well. It was usually lit right before the Preface, on a small stand like you'd see in A Christmas Carol or something, and kept lit until the ablutions. They also had the ritual of servers holding candles, but the ritual was a little different. Same spirit, though.
We do as you say, having two torchbearers flanking the altar rail at a High Mass.  Nothing of the sort at a Low Mass, however.

As far as the Benedictine Mass goes . . . isn't it the same Missal as the Roman rite, only with the addition of "patri nostro Benedicto" into the Confiteor?  I wasn't aware of them having their own liturgical rite, otherwise.
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#18
Huh.  I always thought it was part of the '55 liturgy and just written out of '62.
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#19
Like someone previously said, it was/is a custom,  probably seen more in Europe back in the day, but even then not standard.  There would be the issue of revising a custom.  It would be good to learn if your diocese had the custom previously.

  Joe

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#20
(08-09-2011, 11:34 PM)Steven Wrote: As far as the Benedictine Mass goes . . . isn't it the same Missal as the Roman rite, only with the addition of "patri nostro Benedicto" into the Confiteor?  I wasn't aware of them having their own liturgical rite, otherwise.

Well, yes it is the Roman Missal. I only call it their own liturgical rite because they have their own calendar. So on any given day the Mass may be different because of a different feast. I don't know if this is technically a use or a rite.
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