Poll: Which ancient Liturgy do you prefer
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Ancient Liturgy Preference (only respond if you have attended both)
#21
As long as we're all talking about ancient liturgies, I have a question I'd like to ask.

We all know that East and West agree (traditionally, anyhow) on a lot of things -- e.g. ad orientem and communion on the tongue – but what about differences? For example, if a Western Catholic attends a Eastern Catholic Divine Liturgy, should he receive communion standing since that's the Eastern custom? Or should he kneel because he himself is a Western Catholic? And, conversely, should an Eastern Catholic at a Western Mass receive standing or kneeling?

Personally, I'm inclined to say that, whoever you are, you should receive standing at a Western Mass or kneeling at an Eastern Liturgy. But I'm interested to hear what the rest of you think.
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#22
(08-21-2011, 01:41 PM)Peter J Wrote: As long as we're all talking about ancient liturgies, I have a question I'd like to ask.

We all know that East and West agree (traditionally, anyhow) on a lot of things -- e.g. ad orientem and communion on the tongue – but what about differences? For example, if a Western Catholic attends a Eastern Catholic Divine Liturgy, should he receive communion standing since that's the Eastern custom? Or should he kneel because he himself is a Western Catholic? And, conversely, should an Eastern Catholic at a Western Mass receive standing or kneeling?

Personally, I'm inclined to say that, whoever you are, you should receive standing at a Western Mass or kneeling at an Eastern Liturgy. But I'm interested to hear what the rest of you think.

The proper form of receiving is kneeling in the West and standing in the East.

I don't think kneeling is ideal or even allowed whatsoever at a Divine Liturgy since the Body and Blood are received from the chalice and kochliárion (spoon) which probably makes the kneeling stance difficult for the priest. Even if it was practical to kneel the tradition and law of the East is to stand.

You're just supposed to follow with the traditions of whatever Rite you are attending which is simply:
East = Stand
West = Kneel

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#23
(08-21-2011, 02:05 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-21-2011, 01:41 PM)Peter J Wrote: As long as we're all talking about ancient liturgies, I have a question I'd like to ask.

We all know that East and West agree (traditionally, anyhow) on a lot of things -- e.g. ad orientem and communion on the tongue – but what about differences? For example, if a Western Catholic attends a Eastern Catholic Divine Liturgy, should he receive communion standing since that's the Eastern custom? Or should he kneel because he himself is a Western Catholic? And, conversely, should an Eastern Catholic at a Western Mass receive standing or kneeling?

Personally, I'm inclined to say that, whoever you are, you should receive standing at a Western Mass or kneeling at an Eastern Liturgy. But I'm interested to hear what the rest of you think.

The proper form of receiving is kneeling in the West and standing in the East.

I don't think kneeling is ideal or even allowed whatsoever at a Divine Liturgy since the Body and Blood are received from the chalice and kochliárion (spoon) which probably makes the kneeling stance difficult for the priest. Even if it was practical to kneel the tradition and law of the East is to stand.

You're just supposed to follow with the traditions of whatever Rite you are attending which is simply:
East = Stand
West = Kneel
Very true. It would also just think it should be done out of respect for their tradition and customs. In the west, we view kneeling as a sign of humility whereas the East sees it as a penitential gesture. This is why they kneel only in Lent.
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#24
(08-20-2011, 09:58 AM)Revixit Wrote: What language is used in the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom?
The Ruthenian Byzantine Church I attend on occasion uses primarily the vernacular and Old Church Slavonic.
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#25
(08-20-2011, 04:03 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: Doubtless the TLM.. I don't know what I'd do without the "Suscipe, sancte Pater," Offerimus tibi, Domine," and "Sucsipe, sancta Trinitas." The offertory as a whole is one of the most beautiful and theologically rich parts of the Mass, and there simply is no offertory in the Eastern liturgy.

Another thing that I prefer about the TLM is that holy Communion is distributed to the faithful under single species
I actually find the symbolism with intiction to be very beautiful. I wish Communion was distributed via intinction in the Latin Mass.
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#26

(08-20-2011, 09:58 AM)Revixit Wrote: What language is used in the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom?


I have only heard Ukrainian and some Slavonic.
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#27
(08-21-2011, 02:05 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-21-2011, 01:41 PM)Peter J Wrote: As long as we're all talking about ancient liturgies, I have a question I'd like to ask.

We all know that East and West agree (traditionally, anyhow) on a lot of things -- e.g. ad orientem and communion on the tongue – but what about differences? For example, if a Western Catholic attends a Eastern Catholic Divine Liturgy, should he receive communion standing since that's the Eastern custom? Or should he kneel because he himself is a Western Catholic? And, conversely, should an Eastern Catholic at a Western Mass receive standing or kneeling?

Personally, I'm inclined to say that, whoever you are, you should receive standing at a Western Mass or kneeling at an Eastern Liturgy. But I'm interested to hear what the rest of you think.

The proper form of receiving is kneeling in the West and standing in the East.

I don't think kneeling is ideal or even allowed whatsoever at a Divine Liturgy since the Body and Blood are received from the chalice and kochliárion (spoon) which probably makes the kneeling stance difficult for the priest. Even if it was practical to kneel the tradition and law of the East is to stand.

You're just supposed to follow with the traditions of whatever Rite you are attending which is simply:
East = Stand
West = Kneel

This. However, at consecration and after receiving communion we kneel.
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#28
(08-21-2011, 03:06 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 09:58 AM)Revixit Wrote: What language is used in the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom?


I have only heard Ukrainian and some Slavonic.

St Josaphat's has an English DL and a Ukrainian one every Sunday.
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#29
(08-21-2011, 04:15 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-21-2011, 03:06 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 09:58 AM)Revixit Wrote: What language is used in the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom?


I have only heard Ukrainian and some Slavonic.

St Josaphat's has an English DL and a Ukrainian one every Sunday.

So does St. Basils where I go. I was directing the question to mother tongues, assuming that was the topic.

I need to go there (St. Josaphats) again. Such a beautiful cathedral, and Bishop David is a good speaker.
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#30
(08-21-2011, 04:17 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: I need to go there (St. Josaphats) again. Such a beautiful cathedral, and Bishop David is a good speaker.

I agree on both counts. I heard him sing the Liturgy on Christmas Eve. It was beautiful. I took a protestant friend. It was his first ever Catholic service in any Rite! He was suitably impressed.
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