Major FSSP school to close
#41
(02-04-2012, 11:47 PM)Eowyn Wrote: I saw a comment about the need for female religious connected with the FSSP. Please pray for this intention, as there are young women like my daughter who are beginning to look for a place to go, and finding the well dry.

Sister Adorers of the Royal Heart of Jesus: http://www.institute-christ-king.org/vocations/sisters/
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#42
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

If you subscribe to the SSPX position on the crisis and have a vocation to the secular priesthood then the only place you can really go is to an SSPX seminary. If you subscribe to the Ecclesia Dei position then you have the Institute, FSSP, Institute of the Good Shepard, Canons of St. John Cantius, etc, to choose from. I think it's just that those with an SSPX type approach are all concentrated in the one group.
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#43
(02-05-2012, 12:42 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

If you subscribe to the SSPX position on the crisis and have a vocation to the secular priesthood then the only place you can really go is to an SSPX seminary. If you subscribe to the Ecclesia Dei position then you have the Institute, FSSP, Institute of the Good Shepard, Canons of St. John Cantius, etc, to choose from. I think it's just that those with an SSPX type approach are all concentrated in the one group.

This makes sense to me. It also piqued my curiosity, do you happen to know the basic positional differences between Ecclesia Dei and the SSPX on the crisis? 
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#44
(02-05-2012, 01:43 AM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-05-2012, 12:42 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

If you subscribe to the SSPX position on the crisis and have a vocation to the secular priesthood then the only place you can really go is to an SSPX seminary. If you subscribe to the Ecclesia Dei position then you have the Institute, FSSP, Institute of the Good Shepard, Canons of St. John Cantius, etc, to choose from. I think it's just that those with an SSPX type approach are all concentrated in the one group.

This makes sense to me. It also piqued my curiosity, do you happen to know the basic positional differences between Ecclesia Dei and the SSPX on the crisis? 

On paper the FSSP accept Vatican II "in the light of Tradition" - although this isn't defined. I have a feeling that it means something very different to the Vatican and something very different to most Ecclesia Dei priests. From my conversations with priests from both groups they're pretty much on the same page when it comes to Vatican II and the New Mass, but the SSPX goes public with their criticism while Ecclesia Dei groups seem to keep silent and only mention it among friends. A good example of this is the recent ecumenical Assisi meeting. The only trad group to (rightfully) kick up a storm about this was the SSPX; although I'm sure that every traditional priest "in good standing" was disgusted by the event as well.

I was lucky enough to get lunch with an FSSP seminarian last month and he was explaining why the Italian bishops prefer the Institute priests to FSSP priests (the Institute concelebrate the Novus Ordo Chrism Mass) and he said "the bishops don't like us because they think we're crypto-schismatics...but that's not true at all...we're not crypto about it"  :LOL:
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#45
(02-05-2012, 02:04 AM)Aragon Wrote: I was lucky enough to get lunch with an FSSP seminarian last month and he was explaining why the Italian bishops prefer the Institute priests to FSSP priests (the Institute concelebrate the Novus Ordo Chrism Mass) and he said "the bishops don't like us because they think we're crypto-schismatics...but that's not true at all...we're not crypto about it"

    :LOL:
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#46
(02-04-2012, 06:31 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 05:24 PM)TrentCath Wrote: Are you saying that only men should teach boys and vice versa?

Ideally, yes. (Unless the female teachers are hot.) Though men should teach co-ed classes, and any religion class.

Male teachers usually command more respect from schoolboys. Especially when they're in high school. I remember when I was a high schooler, my friends and I were far more likely to shut up in class when a strong man was in charge. Classes taught by women tended to be far more rambunctious.

A) I'm gonna ignore the bracketed section
B) Anecdotal, unless one can prove that all or most women will teach all or most schoolboys worse, you're not making a substantiated claim but an unsubstantiated claim and thus an unreasonable claim
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#47
(02-05-2012, 02:04 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-05-2012, 01:43 AM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-05-2012, 12:42 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

If you subscribe to the SSPX position on the crisis and have a vocation to the secular priesthood then the only place you can really go is to an SSPX seminary. If you subscribe to the Ecclesia Dei position then you have the Institute, FSSP, Institute of the Good Shepard, Canons of St. John Cantius, etc, to choose from. I think it's just that those with an SSPX type approach are all concentrated in the one group.

This makes sense to me. It also piqued my curiosity, do you happen to know the basic positional differences between Ecclesia Dei and the SSPX on the crisis? 

On paper the FSSP accept Vatican II "in the light of Tradition" - although this isn't defined. I have a feeling that it means something very different to the Vatican and something very different to most Ecclesia Dei priests. From my conversations with priests from both groups they're pretty much on the same page when it comes to Vatican II and the New Mass, but the SSPX goes public with their criticism while Ecclesia Dei groups seem to keep silent and only mention it among friends. A good example of this is the recent ecumenical Assisi meeting. The only trad group to (rightfully) kick up a storm about this was the SSPX; although I'm sure that every traditional priest "in good standing" was disgusted by the event as well.

I was lucky enough to get lunch with an FSSP seminarian last month and he was explaining why the Italian bishops prefer the Institute priests to FSSP priests (the Institute concelebrate the Novus Ordo Chrism Mass) and he said "the bishops don't like us because they think we're crypto-schismatics...but that's not true at all...we're not crypto about it"  :LOL:

Which institute concelebrate the NO mass and does anyone have any proof? Out of curiosity of course...
Reply
#48
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

The small number of seminaries is most likely because they haven't been around as long as the SSPX, but schools well that is odd. Perhaps because the bishops don't like them very much and ironically the very thing they trumpet (being approved) is what gives them trouble.
Reply
#49
(02-05-2012, 05:22 AM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-05-2012, 02:04 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-05-2012, 01:43 AM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-05-2012, 12:42 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

If you subscribe to the SSPX position on the crisis and have a vocation to the secular priesthood then the only place you can really go is to an SSPX seminary. If you subscribe to the Ecclesia Dei position then you have the Institute, FSSP, Institute of the Good Shepard, Canons of St. John Cantius, etc, to choose from. I think it's just that those with an SSPX type approach are all concentrated in the one group.

This makes sense to me. It also piqued my curiosity, do you happen to know the basic positional differences between Ecclesia Dei and the SSPX on the crisis? 

On paper the FSSP accept Vatican II "in the light of Tradition" - although this isn't defined. I have a feeling that it means something very different to the Vatican and something very different to most Ecclesia Dei priests. From my conversations with priests from both groups they're pretty much on the same page when it comes to Vatican II and the New Mass, but the SSPX goes public with their criticism while Ecclesia Dei groups seem to keep silent and only mention it among friends. A good example of this is the recent ecumenical Assisi meeting. The only trad group to (rightfully) kick up a storm about this was the SSPX; although I'm sure that every traditional priest "in good standing" was disgusted by the event as well.

I was lucky enough to get lunch with an FSSP seminarian last month and he was explaining why the Italian bishops prefer the Institute priests to FSSP priests (the Institute concelebrate the Novus Ordo Chrism Mass) and he said "the bishops don't like us because they think we're crypto-schismatics...but that's not true at all...we're not crypto about it"  :LOL:

Which institute concelebrate the NO mass and does anyone have any proof? Out of curiosity of course...

I was told by an FSSP seminarian that the Institute of Christ the King priests concelebrate the New Mass. Take that with a grain of salt as I'm not sure if that's a policy or just the ones that this seminarian knows.
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#50
(02-05-2012, 12:42 AM)Aragon Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 10:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 04:16 PM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 02:26 PM)Might_4_Right Wrote: I was looking at the numbers and I can see how they could be disconcerting to some.

FSSP  has   0 schools
SSPX  has 88 schools + 2 university-level institutes

They have at least 1 boarding school in France I know of and a few more on the continent but still one would think that being 'approved' they could have more schools, but no.

Your right. I sometimes rely on Wikipedia a little to much.
I looked for quite some time but was unable to find a definitive source for the actual numbers.
But I think I found at least four other FSSP schools including one that also closed recently which was St. Stephen Academy in Sacramento, CA. Which shut it doors in June of 2009

The three others I found were;

St. Clement's School in Ottawa, Canada

St. John Vianney Prep. School close to Topeka, KS

Kolbe Immaculata School in Pequnannock, NJ

I also noticed that the FSSP only has two seminaries compared to the six the SSPX currently has.
If these numbers are correct they seem odd to me, I would of thought the FSSP, considering their good standing with the Holy See, would have out paced the SSPX by now.
It makes one wonder if there really has been a conspiracy to sever the Church from her past, but the better part of me thinks there must be a more prosaic explanation for the disparity in the growth rates of the two societies.

If you subscribe to the SSPX position on the crisis and have a vocation to the secular priesthood then the only place you can really go is to an SSPX seminary. If you subscribe to the Ecclesia Dei position then you have the Institute, FSSP, Institute of the Good Shepard, Canons of St. John Cantius, etc, to choose from. I think it's just that those with an SSPX type approach are all concentrated in the one group.

This is not true. The SSPX has ridiculously  more seminarians when the others mentioned are added together.
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