Is the US next?
#1


S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
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#2
Why does it take so long? Is there a doctor shortage in Canada? Can you imagine waiting so long to find out if you have a brain tumor?
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#3
Who prepared this piece?
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#4
http://www.onthefencefilms.com/video/brainsurgery.html
S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
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#5
Interesting. I suspect the legal remedy will be something like an order requiring expedited appeals (or at least that would be a likely remedy under US administrative law, state or federal)

The plight of the individual is compelling indeed. Getting rid of single payer in favor of free-market capitalism in medicine (which is what we have in the US except for those who qualify for medicare or medicaid) does not strike me as a good remedy. Attacking those who seek to make medical care more equitably available in the US is b.s. propaganda. The American patient without insurance, or whose coverage was denied, and did not have the inheritance that these people were fortunate enough to have at their moment of crisis, would be left with no option at all.

The overwhelming majority of Jesus' miracles involved health care. We should, IMHO, learn from His example and do everything we can to make it available as a fundamental human right.

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#6
I think that the journalist's point was that the Canadian system is not worth copying because it has failed. My take on his position as far as the US is concerned is that there are concerns among Canadians that they will have fewer options available to them if the US goes single payer. It looks like a well-founded, though not altruistic, concern.
 
I wonder about Spooky's question; why is there such a wait? I wonder if the single payer system has made the practice of medicine so unattractive to physicians that they aren't willing to bother with it, or if the compensation is so low that it isn't worth spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on a degree.
 
Socialism is already well-entrenched in the US. I doubt it will be long before socialized medicine is here. I'm not sure it will be better than what we have now in the long run, but I am willing to listen to both sides of the issue.
S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
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#7
Quote:I wonder about Spooky's question; why is there such a wait?

That is the important question about this story. Nothing in it suggests the treatment he would have gotten in Canada would have been medically different (I'm not saying one way or the other, it's an unknown based on this piece.)

It may have to do with the docs, it may have to do with the cost, it may have to do with the paper-pushers in the bureaucracy, it may be something else entirely.

That's why I noted that, IMHO, under American law, the remedy would be a means of expediting the matter. It's a due process issue.

But the mere fact that the Canadian system is "single payer," without more (facts) is an insufficient argument to oppose major, huge, significant health care reforms in the U.S. (Do I feel strongly about that?)
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#8
Quote:I wonder if the single payer system has made the practice of medicine so unattractive to physicians that they aren't willing to bother with it, or if the compensation is so low that it isn't worth spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on a degree.

Well that raises a whole question about the cost of education, and whether it's become unobtainable by far too many, and whether physicians, whose average income (after insurance etc) was $168,000 in 2003, may have expectations which are higher than the rest of us mere mortals. http://www.hschange.org/CONTENT/851/?PRINT=1

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#9
Not only do we have a doctor shortage, but a shortage of MRI machines. Hospitals in Toronto are doing MRIs 24 hours a day in order to try to keep up with the patients. It's a regular occurrence for Ontarians to go to Buffalo for MRIs, surgery, etc. Cancer patients die regularly here because they don't get their treatment in time.
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#10
curious_catholic Wrote:Not only do we have a doctor shortage, but a shortage of MRI machines. Hospitals in Toronto are doing MRIs 24 hours a day in order to try to keep up with the patients. It's a regular occurrence for Ontarians to go to Buffalo for MRIs, surgery, etc. Cancer patients die regularly here because they don't get their treatment in time.

And it has been that way for a long time, with no improvement.

When I was in med school in Philadelphia in 1990, we had a visiting prof explaining the technology of MRIs. He had helped develop them.

As an aside, he mentioned at the time that there were more MRI units in the city of Philadelphia than the entire country of Canada.

I don't know what the ratio is at present, but Canada lags far behind the USA in access to and number of MRI units and other advanced imaging. Same goes for almost every type of elective surgery, such as knee and hip replacements.

The reason? Simple. Rationing health care. That is what socialism does.
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