Huge development in bird flu (H5N1)
#11
Is this likely? That would mean that each cat would have had to ingest a strain of the virus that, in each individual cat, mutated into a strain that would infect mammals. It is far, far more likely that one cat did this, and that this strain became pathogenic. But I rather like the other theory, for peace of mind...
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#12
universalindult Wrote:It might only be a pandemic as bad as 1918.

That was pretty bad. Let's hope not.
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#13
actiofidei Wrote:Is this likely? That would mean that each cat would have had to ingest a strain of the virus that, in each individual cat, mutated into a strain that would infect mammals. It is far, far more likely that one cat did this, and that this strain became pathogenic. But I rather like the other theory, for peace of mind...
Is that what is happening with human cases? That the person ingests some part of an infected bird, and the virus in the bird mutates within the human and makes the human sick?

I just don't know very well how it all works... I just figured that the cats got sick the same way the people did.
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#14
The Vatican's AsiaNews is reporting on this story:

Bird flu back in Thailand and Japan, found in cats in Indonesia

http://www.asianews.it/index.php?l=en&art=8243&size=A

by Weena Kowitwanij

Virus is found on a duck farm in Phitsanulok. It might easily be transmitted from stray cats to humans. Bird flu outbreak is reported in one farm.

[Image: aviaria_%28264_x_345%29.jpg]

Phitsanulok (AsiaNews) – Concern over the H5N1 virus and the bird flu remains high in Thailand, Japan and Indonesia.

Thawat Suntracharn, director-general of Thailand’s Department of Communicable Disease Control (CDC), said that on “January 10, ducks died on a farm in Phitsanulok. After tests showed they were infected with the H5N1 virus, more than 2,000 birds were culled the next day. This is first outbreak of the year and comes 166 days after the last one.

Tests are also being carried out in every farm within a five kilometre (three miles) radius. Poultry within a ten kilometre radius cannot be moved for the next 30 days

Phitsanulok province has a humid climate and is an ideal place for the virus, which has previously been reported in the area.

At least 22 people have already shown flu symptoms but tests exclude it is of the avian kind.

Concern is growing though because of the approaching Chinese New Year (which falls on February 18 this year), when all Thais of Chinese origin are likely to eat poultry-based dishes.

The CDC is inspecting all slaughter houses to prevent outbreaks. In Phitsanulok health care workers will go house to house to check for people showing bird flu-like symptoms. Should there be other cases emerge, they should show up be within a month.

Meanwhile in Indonesia, C.A. Nidom, head of the Avian Influenza Laboratorium at the University of Airlangga, said the virus was found in dozens of cats in various cities from Java to Sumatra.

Some 500 cats were tested and about 20 per cent were found to carry the virus. This shows that it is evolving and that there is a possibility that the virus might be able to affect humans not only through poultry but also through cats.

Cats, Nidom explained, are much closer to humans than birds, but further studies are needed before one can be sure whether they can pass on the disease or not.

Tested cats were eventually released.

Tests are currently under way for a man in Jakarta’s Persahabatan Hospital. His wife and 18-year-old son died a few days ago—they were infected with the virus.

Should it be proven that direct contagion is possible between relatives, this would confirm the theory that transmission is easier between genetically-related individuals.

For Michael Osterholm, from the University of Minnesota (US), this might be the first sign of the pandemic.

In Japan’s Miyazaki Prefecture, 900 kilometres south-west of Tokyo, 12,000 chickens from one farm will be incinerated after 3,900 of them died last Saturday. But it is not clear whether the H5N1 or any other virus was involved.

Hisanori Ogura, a local health care official, said that the measure taken was only meant to prevent contagion. He added that nothing similar was reported from other farms.


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#15
The virus has to mutate into a form that can infect humans. Fortunately, so far, with those cases of human infection, the virus has been isolated. It is possible that each cat got the virus directly from contact with infected birds, but it does not seem probable to me that for each cat, the virus mutated into a form that infects cats. Far more likely is that one or a few cats were infected and then spread the virus (now already in a form that infects cats) to others.
 
Regardless of how it originated though, the fact remains that these cats are carrying the virus to who knows where.
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#16
I've posted this prayer here before, but thought I'd post it again:
 
 
Francis John Bartholomew, a Passionist monk of SS. John and Paul at Rome, a most holy man, who had frequent revelations, once saying Mass, thought of the scourges about to fall on the world - wars, famine, pestilence, etc., when the following prayer was revealed to him, and he was told that whosoever recited it with devotion, would be preserved from all dangers with which the whole world would be visited.
 
Prayer:
 
O Jesus, Divine Redeemer, be merciful to us and to the whole world. Amen.
 
O Powerful God! O Holy God! O Immortal God! have pity on us, and all who are in the whole world. Amen.
 
Pardon and mercy, O my Jesus, during these present dangers. Pour on us Thy most Precious Blood. Amen.
 
O Eternal Father, be merciful to us. By the Blood of Jesus Christ, Thy holy Son, be merciful to us, we beseech Thee. Amen. Amen. Amen.
 
O God, be appeased by the supplications we address to Thee, and through the intercession of the ever Blessed Virgin Mary, the glorious Saint Joseph, and all the Saints, defend us from all dangers, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
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#17
Headlines in my local papers today: Rash of bird flu cases across Asia raises alarms.

Without going too much into the details of the reports, there is a real chance that where I live may be hit by this bird flu outbreak also. It's extremely frightening that it's happening so close to home.

Kyrie eleison! :(
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#18
Well, this is good news! It looks as if the Icelanders may have found a cure for bird flu, in an enzyme found in cods. Link.
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#19
actiofidei Wrote:

The virus has to mutate into a form that can infect humans. Fortunately, so far, with those cases of human infection, the virus has been isolated. It is possible that each cat got the virus directly from contact with infected birds, but it does not seem probable to me that for each cat, the virus mutated into a form that infects cats. Far more likely is that one or a few cats were infected and then spread the virus (now already in a form that infects cats) to others.

Regardless of how it originated though, the fact remains that these cats are carrying the virus to who knows where.

Thanks for explaining that. I am not that scientific...
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#20
newtolatin Wrote:Thanks for explaining that. I am not that scientific...

Me neither, really. No problem, though!
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