Medieval Cooking
#1
Came across this Medieval Cookery site via the Athanasius Kircher Society blog. Two recipes from the site (there're lots more there!) are below. I have to include the Almond Pudding since I'm an almond freak...:
 

 

Almond Pudding

1 cup almond milk
1 1/2 Tbsp. sugar
1/4 cup cream
1/2 Tbsp. rose water
1/2 Tbsp. unflavored gelatin

Heat Almond Milk add cream. Add sugar and rosewater at simmer. When simmering again add gelatin. When thoroughly mixed, refrigerate for about 4 hours. When pudding sets (it will still be a bit thin to our modern idea of pudding), place in serving bowl and sprinkle with sugar.

Source [Delights for Ladies, Hugh Plat]: 27 - To make Leach of Almonds. Take halfe a pound of sweet Almonds, and beat them in a mortar; then strain them with a pint of sweet milke from the cow; then put to it one graine of musk, 2 spoonfuls of Rose-water, two ounces of fine sugar, the weight of 3 whole shillings of Isinglass that is very white, and so boyle them; and let all run thorow a strainer: then may you slice the same, and so serve it.
 

Pumpes (Meatballs)

1 pound ground beef
2 egg yolks
1/4 cup currants
1 Tbsp. sugar
1/8 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. mace
1/4 tsp. cloves
1/4 tsp. cubebs  [Vox: ?]
1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. salt
pinch saffron
4 cups beef broth (approx.)
1/4 cup wine (approx.)

Sauce:

2 cups almond milk
1 Tbsp. rice flour
3 Tbsp. sugar
1/8 tsp. mace
1/8 tsp. cinnamon

Mix ground beef, egg yolkes, currants, sugar, and spices. Form into small balls, about an inch in diameter. Place in boiling broth along with wine and cook until done - about 15 minutes. Remove from broth and place in serving dish. In a separate pan mix almond milk, rice flour, sugar, and mace. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer over medium head until thick. Pour just enough sauce over the pumpes to thoroughly coat them and serve.

Source [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books, T. Austin (ed.)]: Pompys. Take Beef, Porke, or Vele, on of hem, & raw, alle to-choppe it atte the dressoure, than grynd hem in a morter as smal as thou may, than caste ther-to Raw olkys of Eyroun, wyn, an a lytil whyte sugre: caste also ther-to pouder Pepyr, & Macys, Clowes, Quybibys, pouder Canelle, Synamoun, & Salt, & a lytil Safroun; then take & make smale Pelettys round y-now, & loke that thou haue a fayre potte of Freysshe brothe of bef or of Capoun, & euer throw hem ther-on & lete hem sethe tyl that they ben y-now; then take & draw vppe a thryfty Mylke of Almaundys, with cold freysshe brothe of Bef, Vele, Moton, other Capoun, & a-lye it with floure of Rys & with Spycerye; & atte the dressoure ley thes pelettys .v. or .vj. in a dysshe, & then pore thin sewe aneward, & serue in, or ellys make a gode thryfty Syryppe & ley thin pelettys atte the dressoure ther-on, & that is gode seruyse.

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#2
I can't resist a culinary mystery! A quick internet search reveals that cubebs (or quybibys, quibibis, etc.) are a type of pepper grown in Java and Sumatra that have a flavor similar to allspice.
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#3
Philomena Wrote:I can't resist a culinary mystery! A quick internet search reveals that cubebs (or quybibys, quibibis, etc.) are a type of pepper grown in Java and Sumatra that have a flavor similar to allspice.

 
Thank you, Philomena! You gonna make any of these recipes? If you do, let us know how they turn out!
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#4
VoxClamantis Wrote: 
Thank you, Philomena! You gonna make any of these recipes? If you do, let us know how they turn out!

Probably not. I haven't had much success with medieval recipes. I don't much care for those Crusader spices (mace, cinnamon, allspice, etc.), and they seem to be in everything. I did make a medieval Venetian dish once that I thought was really good. If I remember correctly, it was basically spaghetti with oil and garlic, but finished with a big handful of cracked black peppercorns. That was delicious, but hardly typical of medieval cooking, since that pepper would have been worth it's weight in gold! Still, these recipes are fun to read, if only for the window onto the past that they give us.
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#5
The meatball recipe looks interesting.
I wonder if you could just substitute the cubebs with cayenne?
 
 
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#6
Sophia Wrote:The meatball recipe looks interesting.
I wonder if you could just substitute the cubebs with cayenne?
 
Despite what I just said, I am tempted to try that one. It sort of looks like an ancestor of Swedish meatballs. I don't know if cayenne would approximate the flavor of cubebs. Most of the on-line sources compare the flavor to allspice, though there is some disagreement, with some arguing that it more closely resembles ginger or black pepper. Apparently you can order cubebs on-line, but I'm not sure it's worth the trouble or the expense for just 1/4 tsp. Are you going to try it, Sophia?
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#7
Yes, and I think I will use the cayenne too, since my family appreciates a little heat.  I'll try it the next time I cook ground meat.  No, I am not going to place an order simply for 1/4 tsp. [Image: laff.gif]  I have made that mistake before, and then get stuck with stuff I can't use.  The worst was when I ordered sumac for a middle eastern meal.  The cookbook insisted that there was no substitute (and there isn't) but even though my family liked the meal, I will still have sumac until the cows come home!
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#8
I know what you mean, Sophia! A little cayenne is always welcome in my house too. [Image: wink.gif] Definitely let us know how it turns out.
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#9
VoxClamantis Wrote:

...then put to it one graine of musk...


Musk? Would that be nutmeg?

Philomena Wrote:

Despite what I just said, I am tempted to try that one. It sort of looks like an ancestor of Swedish meatballs.


What I was thinking. But no bread crumbs? (or as I do it, Saltine crumbs...)

I'm intrigued by the idea of just yolks and meat.
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