Not smoking can be sinful
#21
I must add here that just because a person has a Ph.D. in Psychology, doesn't mean one is schooled in the area of addictions. Most psychologists are not trained in this area. I have a degree in Psychology myself and have gone to therapists of all kinds, and have found that one needs special training for working with people with addictions over and above or aside from regular psych courses in any college or university. Also, a Ph.D. in Theology doesn't mean one is infallible in all matters theological. Need I note here that most theology books were written before they knew the real effects of nicotine. It has only been known since the late 1980's and later. I quit nicotine in 1987 and they were just finding out about the inherent dangers of nicotine and the fact that it is always addictive and it is a drug like cocaine. And that second hand smoke can kill your neighbor. Again, I challenge anyone on this list to look up Nicotine Anonymous to find out about these things. I am sorry for being so adamant about this, but I have been hurt by nicotine as well as many of those I love, so I have a lot of emotion invested in it. Forgive me if I come across as a know-it-all or belligerent. I do not mean to be that way. I am just trying to give you all the facts as they are. Instruct the ignorant, as one of the Spiritual Works of Mercy says.
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#22
miss_fluffy Wrote:I can smoke moderately quite easily. Either just a couple of cigs a day, or a few on a weekend night after a nice dinner. I only smoke pure tobacco, usually Natural American Spirits. Maybe that has something to do with my ability to take them or leave them.

I tend to crave them when I watch old movies where everyone smokes, and so sometimes I stop the movie and run out for a pack. Currently I have not had a cigarrette in maybe 4 or 5 months...

I hear that, generally I do pipe when I can get it, but when I watch the old black and white movies with all of the cigarettes and stuff it's nice to sit back with a smokes and blow smoke rings in the dark. I have to say I am one of the 1% as well, I have no problem not having a smoke for weeks at a time, those figures must be for chemicals cigarette people only type thing.
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#23
incrucetrad Wrote:I must add here that just because a person has a Ph.D. in Psychology, doesn't mean one is schooled in the area of addictions. Most psychologists are not trained in this area. I have a degree in Psychology myself and have gone to therapists of all kinds, and have found that one needs special training for working with people with addictions over and above or aside from regular psych courses in any college or university. Also, a Ph.D. in Theology doesn't mean one is infallible in all matters theological. Need I note here that most theology books were written before they knew the real effects of nicotine. It has only been known since the late 1980's and later. I quit nicotine in 1987 and they were just finding out about the inherent dangers of nicotine and the fact that it is always addictive and it is a drug like cocaine. And that second hand smoke can kill your neighbor. Again, I challenge anyone on this list to look up Nicotine Anonymous to find out about these things. I am sorry for being so adamant about this, but I have been hurt by nicotine as well as many of those I love, so I have a lot of emotion invested in it. Forgive me if I come across as a know-it-all or belligerent. I do not mean to be that way. I am just trying to give you all the facts as they are. Instruct the ignorant, as one of the Spiritual Works of Mercy says.

I'm guessing here, but are you referring to cigarettes?
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#24
I refer to nicotine in all its forms. Cigars, cigarettes, pipe smoking, chewing tobacco, etc.  Some people claim to be able to use marijuana only now and then recreationally. Some people claim to be able to use cocaine only now and then recreationally. Usually these people eventually get hooked, or addicted. If they do not, they are an anomaly. Again, I emphasize here that people who disagree with me go visit the Nicotine Anonymous website and read their literature.
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#25
incrucetrad Wrote:I refer to nicotine in all its forms. Cigars, cigarettes, pipe smoking, chewing tobacco, etc.  Some people claim to be able to use marijuana only now and then recreationally. Some people claim to be able to use cocaine only now and then recreationally. Usually these people eventually get hooked, or addicted. If they do not, they are an anomaly. Again, I emphasize here that people who disagree with me go visit the Nicotine Anonymous website and read their literature.

Again, you are trying to argue against Church teaching with secular sources. 
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#26
incrucetrad Wrote:I refer to nicotine in all its forms. Cigars, cigarettes, pipe smoking, chewing tobacco, etc. Some people claim to be able to use marijuana only now and then recreationally. Some people claim to be able to use cocaine only now and then recreationally. Usually these people eventually get hooked, or addicted. If they do not, they are an anomaly. Again, I emphasize here that people who disagree with me go visit the Nicotine Anonymous website and read their literature.

Inexperience and indoctrination, ever heard the other side of the official story? Analogy: I won't get the truth of the fed about 911, I gotta go to its critics - same principle applies here.
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#27
I've been smoking cigars off and on for nearly 15 years, and I've never gotten hooked. I might smoke one or two one night and then go three months until my next one. It's very easy for me to stop when I want to. The Church teaches that anything can be abused, and that is sinful. Enjoying something in moderation, however, as long as it's not intrinsically evil, is allowed. (By the way, for some reason this reminds me of something my friend always says: "Catholics drink on the front porch; Baptists drink on the back porch.")
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#28
Ya know, many people struggle with gluttony these days, and it's not just nicotine gluttony.

Look around at all the round people, and you'll see. Food is just as addictive as those cancer-sticks.  Do you stare judgementally at fat people in the communion line?
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#29
miss_fluffy Wrote:Ya know, many people struggle with gluttony these days, and it's not just nicotine gluttony.

Look around at all the round people, and you'll see. Food is just as addictive as those cancer-sticks. Do you stare judgementally at fat people in the communion line?

Fun facts:

Fast food is more deadly than cigarettes.

Now who do we see going on crusade against that with the same ferocity as cigarettes? No on‌e = AGENDA.
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#30
Since no one believes in the concept of real "sin" anymore, the liberal idiots running the world have to have something to decry. Smokers make wonderful scapegoats, and it makes the liberals feel good to actually be against something. It's also a wonderful way to raise money -by taxing the smokers to death. It's a great revenue-generator! If people actually stopped smoking, I wonder how they'd recoup all that tax money?

I've done quite a bit of research on all these "smoking kills" studies, and it's putting it mildly to say they are slanted beyond belief. All these "Second-hand smoke kills 4.8 skillion people per year" headlines are nauseating. Why don't they fight other behaviors with equal ferocity? "Gay intercourse kills 3.7 million homosexuals per year", "Don't engage in homosexual behavior. It's dangerous.", "Gay Sex Kills". Talk about risky behavior! AIDS, anyone?? But nooooooo....telling gays to stop engaging in risky sexual activity would be "homophobic" and "discriminating against homosexuals". It's ok to risk infecting people with a deadly, incurable disease, but light up a smoke and you're a pariah in the community. Please. [Image: blah.gif] 
Let's get some perspective here.

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