Fans of Dr. W.A. Price -Recipes and tips
#1
I've been thinking of starting this thread for awhile.  I hope it's possible to avoid arguments and simply share tips and stories about living the Weston A. Price foundation's philosophy for eating.

I purchased Nourishing Traditions a couple of years ago, but have been slow to implement, mostly due to financial constraints.  I've recently started doing "cheap" things as recommended in the book.  I wondered if anyone else had inexpensive tips for incorporating WAP recommendations in their diet?
Reply
#2
The first tip is something I started two months ago.  It incorporates beet kvass, chicken stock, and eggs into many many many meals.

I start on Saturday with 2 lbs of the cheapest, free range chicken quarters I can find, a "bunch" (2 or 3) of organic beets, a bunch of organic celery, a large organic onion, and a dozen of free range eggs (I can usually find them for $2 or 3$).

When I get home I throw the chicken in the crock pot with some naturally fermented apple cidar vinegar, the onion, and the heart of the celery (I save the outer green celery for later).  That will cook on low until Sunday morning.  I then cut the "greens" off the beets and wash them, put them in the fridge for later.  I cut up the beets, and start my beet kvass brewing.

Once my chicken stock is ready, I strain out the chicken and vegetables and hand-pick all the meat off the bones.  I use this to make chicken salad with olive oil, vinegar, some chopped celery, and some naturally fermented pickle relish. (I always need to add alot of sea salt because the boiling has taken a great deal of flavor from the chicken).

Now for lunches I have chicken salad that I eat on celery sticks or on sprouted grain bread. 

And for dinner: I reheat some of the chicken stock and add some butter and salt, and a handful of hand-torn beet greens reserved from my beets to the stock.  Once the greens have boiled for a minute or two, I turn off the heat and crack an egg into the soup.  I only stir it a little, leaving the yolk intact (this will serve to only cook the egg-white).  After it has cooled off significantly (after I sneak a few sips) I break open the yolk and stir it in, making the soup nice and creamy.
Reply
#3
Sounds deeee-lish!  When's dinner?
Reply
#4
I'm really not one for making the meals and recipes in Mrs. Fallon's cookbook. Like you I have major monetary restrictions (I've been unemployed for about the past year). I'm only recently back into a cow share/coop for $25/year plus $6.25/gallon. I'm only affording it with the help of my parents (God bless them). Anyway I have tried to make some of the sourdough breads and lacto-fermented soda beverages; sometimes I'm successful, other times..... Other than that I've only made grass fed chicken soup which turned out good, those chickens were something else for sure, their fat was a bright yellowish-a good sign that they're grazed well.
Reply
#5
Catholicmilkman-

If you do nothing else in the book, you have got to make beet kvass.  That stuff is like liquid gold and pretty cheap to make.

I've had one batch turn out bad, it had a bunch of mold in it.  But I think it's because I didn't have a well-sealed jar. 

I've noticed that if I do eat junk food.  Say, a fast food burger or something, and wash it down with this stuff, it seems to digest very well.
Reply
#6
miss_fluffy Wrote:Catholicmilkman-

If you do nothing else in the book, you have got to make beet kvass.  That stuff is like liquid gold and pretty cheap to make.

I've had one batch turn out bad, it had a bunch of mold in it.  But I think it's because I didn't have a well-sealed jar. 

I've noticed that if I do eat junk food.  Say, a fast food burger or something, and wash it down with this stuff, it seems to digest very well.

Fluffers,

Do you have a link for the beet kvass?
S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
Reply
#7
No, but it's easy.  Especially if you have access to raw goat whey.

3 medium beets or 2 large ones
1 tbsp salt (acts as preservative)
1/4 active culture whey
Half gallon jar or non-metal container (glass or porcelain is best)
Filtered water

Chop the beet roots into a rough chop.  My best batch used about .5 to 1cm square cubes.  DO NOT grate.  Too much juice in the mix will encourage alcohol production.  Put the chopped beets in your container, add whey, salt, and filtered water to fill the container.  Stir well, cover tightly, and place in a warm(70 -75 degrees fahrenheit), and dry area (less mold in dry areas).  Let it sit there undisturbed for 2 whole days.  When you check it out two days later, it may have some mold floating on the top, just spoon this off, a little won't hurt you.  Put it in your fridge with the beet pieces still in there, they will help maintain the culture.  When you're done drinking it, you can refill it with water, add some salt and re-ferment your beet choppings, the second batch won't be as strong.  Now that you've made some, you can use it to innoculate your next fresh batch of kvass.

I think you can buy something called Piima powder, that you use to make cheese, and then use the whey leftover.  I don't know much about that, I'm lucky to have a supplier of fresh raw goat whey in my area.
Reply
#8
BTW, I think my goat whey supplier might send some to you via fed ex.  My quart of the stuff has lasted me a whole year.

www.whiteegretfarm.com

Reply
#9
miss_fluffy Wrote:Catholicmilkman-

If you do nothing else in the book, you have got to make beet kvass.  That stuff is like liquid gold and pretty cheap to make.

I've had one batch turn out bad, it had a bunch of mold in it.  But I think it's because I didn't have a well-sealed jar. 

I've noticed that if I do eat junk food.  Say, a fast food burger or something, and wash it down with this stuff, it seems to digest very well.

I'll get the beets tomorrow when I get my raw milk since it's on the way. Btw have you ever tried to make that Russian rye drink I forget the name of it, that sounded good.

Thanks for the recipe.

Reply
#10
Catholicmilkman Wrote:
miss_fluffy Wrote:Catholicmilkman-

If you do nothing else in the book, you have got to make beet kvass.  That stuff is like liquid gold and pretty cheap to make.

I've had one batch turn out bad, it had a bunch of mold in it.  But I think it's because I didn't have a well-sealed jar. 

I've noticed that if I do eat junk food.  Say, a fast food burger or something, and wash it down with this stuff, it seems to digest very well.

I'll get the beets tomorrow when I get my raw milk since it's on the way. Btw have you ever tried to make that Russian rye drink I forget the name of it, that sounded good.

Thanks for the recipe
.

That russian rye bread drink is the best. We got the recipe once from a russian seminarian and promptly lost it. :( If anyone has it I would love to see it posted.

This may seem like a silly question, but I'll ask anyway...

What is Kvass? And why is it "liquid gold"? :huh?:
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)