Fans of Dr. W.A. Price -Recipes and tips
#31
Another recipe I make weekly that rounds out my diet nicely:

Crispy Walnuts
Glass container 
Small plate or cover for glass container
enough walnuts to fill the glass container about an inch from the top
Filtered water
1-2 tbsp sea salt (or more for taste)
Pumpkin pie spice/ Garam Masala / cinnamon / whatever
Coconut oil or light olive oil

Put the walnuts in your glass container, fill the container with filtered water to the top.  Add sea salt to taste, at least 2 tbsp per gallon of water.  Stir until sea salt is dissolved (you might want to dissolve the sea salt in warm water before adding it).  Place a small plate, or other glass or ceramic cover on top of the walnuts so that they are pushed into the brine (otherwise many will float, and not get well soaked).  Allow walnuts to soak 12-24 hours.  After soaking, strain walnuts and place them on a cookie sheet or casserole dish.  Leave them in your oven at the lowest possible setting.  150 degrees is best, 200 will suffice if your oven doesn't go lower.  Let them "roast" for a few hours until they dry up a bit and toss them with the oil and your favorite spice, then return them to the oven.  Total roasting time should be at least 12 hours, up to 24 depending on the oven temp and how crispy you want them to be. You might want to add more spice and oil after they're done.

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#32
learning Wrote:I discovered W.A. Price about 4 years ago and I actually think it was a step in my conversion-helping me to become closer to God and the natural law written in my heart.

I heard Sally Fallon speak at an Acres USA conference a few years back. She's some kind of Protestant, which sect I'm not sure, but there were fundamentalist overtones. However, one great point that she made, and which she make throughout her Nourishing Traditions sidenotes, is that authentic, real food is a basic, essential building block for a healthy spiritual life.

This shouldn't be translated into, "You are spiritually stunted because you can't afford raw milk". It's worth considering though, that gaining access to real food should be a priority for any family. We live in a depraved culture that makes makes precious things like marriage, work, the Mass, seem cheap and vulgar. Food is treated the same way.
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#33
CatholicAgrarian Wrote:Have you ever made kombucha? We've had a culture going for a couple of years now. It's very cheap as tea is the base, and its fun to experiment with, We've added honey and plum juice to sweet it up a bit. Sally F says drinks like these fill a primitive urge that modern man tries to satisfy with Budweiser and Coke.

I have a question for you:  I tried some store bought Kombucha and it was wonderful and fizzy.  Does your homebrewed stuff end up fizzy?  Have you tried making any of the other fermented beverages like orangina or grapeade or punch?  Are they a little fizzy?
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#34
We cork it in wine bottles, and it does get fizzy. This is from the live kombucha culture cells eating whatever sugars that are left and converting them to C02. If you want homebrewed whatever to become carbonated it has be put into a airtight container that can handle a few pounds of pressure. Cappers for beer bottles can be bought on ebay for $10-15.
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#35
CatholicAgrarian Wrote:This shouldn't be translated into, "You are spiritually stunted because you can't afford raw milk". It's worth considering though, that gaining access to real food should be a priority for any family. We live in a depraved culture that makes makes precious things like marriage, work, the Mass, seem cheap and vulgar. Food is treated the same way.

I've been saying almost the very same thing for the past couple years.
I want (and need) the real Catholic faith.

Why can't I want and need real food, real art, real science, real ecomonics, etc.

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#36
miss_fluffy Wrote:No, but it's easy.  Especially if you have access to raw goat whey.

3 medium beets or 2 large ones
1 tbsp salt (acts as preservative)
1/4 active culture whey
Half gallon jar or non-metal container (glass or porcelain is best)
Filtered water
Fluffy, will raw cow's milk whey work? Because I'm making cheese right now so I have that. Also did you mean 1/4 cup of active culture whey?
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#37
Yes, the cow's milk whey would work fine.  And yes, I meant 1/4 cup.. whoops.  If you're making cheese by letting the whey filter out on your counter for a few days, that should be plenty active whey.
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#38
As to the sauerkraut (fermented cabbage)--that is sooooo good! I have never ever liked store-bought sauerkraut (a tradition at Thanksgiving in our family), but this stuff is completely different. It's inexpensive and easy to make.

We get whey from our yogurt (the yellow liquid that shows up in yogurt). We make the yogurt from dried milk. (Can't get raw milk [yet!] and only recently experienced sufficient increase in income to consider regular milk)

I make her "cheating" whole wheat bread, but I cheat even further by not using butter in the bread dough (we go through enough butter as it is!).

One excellent thing is to have soaked (water and whey) oatmeal for breakfast. My aches, pains, and stiffness have been greatly diminished since I started having that along with cinnamon (you're supposed to sweeten with honey, but I use sugar as I am not wide-awake enough to remember--still helps :) )

I am hoping to get a kombucha "baby" and kefir grains sometime this summer... totally reusable, so a good investment.
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