Chili?
#11
Quote:Is Chili an American thing, or do you fisheaters from other countries have it as well? I believe the origins are Mexican, but Mexican Chilies I've had are made with chunks of meat and chilies and aren't much like the American ground meat with chili powder tomatoes and beans.

I remember seeing a show about this on the Food channel. Let's see if i remember how it goes...

The folks down on the wagon trail learned the preparation from tribes down around Texas. I guess it was something they found easy to prepare whilst "on the road". Later on, places that served chili opened up along these routes and became really popular up until paved roads came along and re-routed everyone.

In Italy, there is a common briased meat stew called spezzatino, which sort of reminds me of chili (when the meat is in larger chunks). Though I've usually had it with either wild boar or donkey meat. For those of you who like it sans beans and splash red wine and cinnamon in your chili, you're probably hitting closer to this.
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#12
Avalonik Wrote:
Quote:Is Chili an American thing, or do you fisheaters from other countries have it as well? I believe the origins are Mexican, but Mexican Chilies I've had are made with chunks of meat and chilies and aren't much like the American ground meat with chili powder tomatoes and beans.

I remember seeing a show about this on the Food channel. Let's see if i remember how it goes...

The folks down on the wagon trail learned the preparation from tribes down around Texas. I guess it was something they found easy to prepare whilst "on the road". Later on, places that served chili opened up along these routes and became really popular up until paved roads came along and re-routed everyone.

In Italy, there is a common briased meat stew called spezzatino, which sort of reminds me of chili (when the meat is in larger chunks). Though I've usually had it with either wild boar or donkey meat. For those of you who like it sans beans and splash red wine and cinnamon in your chili, you're probably hitting closer to this.

Interesting, thanks.  I've never heard of cinnamon in chili.
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#13
Johanna Wrote:Interesting, thanks. I've never heard of cinnamon in chili.

Greeks very often put a little cinnamon in their tomato sauce-- not enough that you can taste it specifically, but enough to give a little warmth.

Try it, it's very good!
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#14
So, I was up late last night watching 'Good Eats' on the Food Network, when I was stunned to learn that chili may be of distinctly "Catholic" origin!

One of the legends around the mysterious origins of chili is that the recipe came from none other than Ven Mary of Agreda, who recieved the recipe in a vision!

From http://www.bfeedme.com/chili-an-interesting-history/
Quote:One of my favorite of the chili legends is from 17th century lore involving a beautiful nun. An old Southwestern American Indian tale has it that the first recipe for chili was put on paper by a lovely nun, Sister Mary of Agreda of Spain, to be exact. She was know to the Indians as ÒLa Dama de AzulÓ, or the lady in blue. She included in her recipe for chili venison or antelope meat, onions, tomatoes & chili peppers. There are no recorded accounts of this however, pure good old fashioned legend. I like it though- a beautiful nun with a taste for chili.

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#15
Avalonik Wrote:So, I was up late last night watching 'Good Eats' on the Food Network, when I was stunned to learn that chili may be of distinctly "Catholic" origin!

One of the legends around the mysterious origins of chili is that the recipe came from none other than Ven Mary of Agreda, who recieved the recipe in a vision!

From http://www.bfeedme.com/chili-an-interesting-history/
Quote:One of my favorite of the chili legends is from 17th century lore involving a beautiful nun. An old Southwestern American Indian tale has it that the first recipe for chili was put on paper by a lovely nun, Sister Mary of Agreda of Spain, to be exact. She was know to the Indians as ÒLa Dama de AzulÓ, or the lady in blue. She included in her recipe for chili venison or antelope meat, onions, tomatoes & chili peppers. There are no recorded accounts of this however, pure good old fashioned legend. I like it though- a beautiful nun with a taste for chili.

I have heard/read that Ven. Mary of Agreda mystically visited the SW Indians without ever leaving Spain, but I had no idea that chili comes from Heaven. Seems appropriate enough, I think. :)  Besides a chili recipe, she also wrote The Mystical City of God. 
S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
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#16
Btw, I do not make chili. That is hubby's domain. But, when he says he is going to make chili, I always make sure there is plenty of salsa in the house. ;)
S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
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#17
Avalonik Wrote:So, I was up late last night watching 'Good Eats' on the Food Network, when I was stunned to learn that chili may be of distinctly "Catholic" origin!

One of the legends around the mysterious origins of chili is that the recipe came from none other than Ven Mary of Agreda, who recieved the recipe in a vision!

From http://www.bfeedme.com/chili-an-interesting-history/
Quote:One of my favorite of the chili legends is from 17th century lore involving a beautiful nun. An old Southwestern American Indian tale has it that the first recipe for chili was put on paper by a lovely nun, Sister Mary of Agreda of Spain, to be exact. She was know to the Indians as ÒLa Dama de AzulÓ, or the lady in blue. She included in her recipe for chili venison or antelope meat, onions, tomatoes & chili peppers. There are no recorded accounts of this however, pure good old fashioned legend. I like it though- a beautiful nun with a taste for chili.

Now I like chili even more!
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#18
Quote: Besides a chili recipe, she also wrote The Mystical City of God.

I've been slowly reading that for 2 yrs. now. It is MINDBLOWING. Ven Mary of Agreda is at the top of my list.

Incorruptible:
[Image: Agreda.jpg]
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#19
I can't debate where chili comes from, but as a native Texican, I will say that real chili involves chunks of tough cow meat stewed down to tender with peppers and a tomato based sauce. Chili is the grown up, potato-less (and no damn carrots), spicy version of beef stew.

Rice, corn and/or beans are good as filler in the bowl, but not to fill out the pot of chili. Putting that crap in a pot of chili is a shootin' offense.

Now days, it's more common to see ground beef in place of chunks o' cow, so it's normal. A whole lot easier too. But a good chili cook can take cube/stew meat and cook it just right that it turns out like it's ground beef.


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#20
Johanna Wrote: 

What do you put in your Chili?


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