The Catholic Diet
#21
Brie en croute...
 
[Image: brie.jpg]
 
served with crackers and fruit.  (I've never done the sauce thing though.)
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#22
Hungarian goulash with lots of noodles and sour cream. All washed down with a good ale/beer/wine.
 
Yum!
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#23

Enchiladas, served with traditional mexican sides,

[Image: Enchilidas_pg_9-16.jpg]

There is even a crucifix in this one.

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#24
LeoXIII Wrote:These look great!  
On an aside, let me say that the Polish people are fantastic. When I was on a trip to Passaic, NJ, a friend of mine introduced me to his friends from Poland. They asked me where I was from and I responded Spain. When they heard this, immediately someone yelled out "Get this man beer" in broken English. They were so warm and welcoming that I never forgot. We spent the entire evening discussing 'futbol' and great legends like Johann Cruyff.
 
It is sometimes so funny because the Irish and the Polish really belong in Southern Europe (in character I mean).

Well, thank you for the kind words! I am most grateful.
Well God put us where we belong but Poland isn't that far north Now, Russia and Norway those are northern Europe but not Poland! ;)
 
Hmm, they only gave you beer. Hmm they must of been very poor or not had anything stronger. I'm amazed they didn't give you some vodka or cognac[in Polish koniak]..... Oh yes I'm not sure who Johann Cruyff is but I think he is from the 1970's, the golden age of Polish 'futbol' when we defeated all the greats even Brazil! If I had only been alived then.
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#25
In honor of my Italian mother I'll add Baccalà. I've never had it myself, but mom spoke of it often as her mother used it often. It's an Italian dried cod fish that poor people used because it was cheap, versatile, and came in handy on Fridays when fresh fish was unavailable. There are many recipes on the internet, it's not just for the poor anymore.

[Image: baccala.jpg]

Baccalà
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#26
Reese Wrote:In honor of my Italian mother I'll add Baccalà. I've never had it myself, but mom spoke of it often as her mother used it often. It's an Italian dried cod fish that poor people used because it was cheap, versatile, and came in handy on Fridays when fresh fish was unavailable. There are many recipes on the internet, it's not just for the poor anymore.

[Image: baccala.jpg]

Baccalà

Yes, we Catalonians and Spaniards eat it as well. In our language it is almost identical (Bacallà). It still is my favourite fish.
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#27
The ole baccala! My Pops used to eat that, too (the baccala man would come around and sell it. They'd sell tamales from a cart, too, and my Dad's loved those ever since). Dad said that his Mom used to make baccala on Christmas Eve. I would love to try it sometime!
 
OK, here's what no Catholic should live without:
 

[Image: creamtea_s.jpg]
 
The very simple, very quick, very scrummy English tea with scones and jam and clotted cream. And I think the jam should go on top of the cream, even though it makes more sense for it to go on the bottom. It looks prettier this way.

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#28
One of my personal favorites:
 

Gingerbread Cake with Lemon Sauce

 

[Image: gingerbrd.jpg]

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#29
Um, I truly can't resist making mention of this universal favorite:

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.. but if I were being serious, I'd go on about Mozart Balls. Yeah, he couldn't touch Beethoven, and he was a Freemason, but he wrote one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever (the Requiem Mass, of course) and the candy named for him is davoon:

 

[Image: mozart3.jpg] 

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#30
One of the ultimate Catholic food experiences -- the Swiss Raclette Meal. It's got the cheese, the wine, the potato, and the sausage -- all mixed up with FIRE and RITUAL and the need to exercise the virtue of patience:
 
 
[Image: raclette%20-%20copie.jpg]
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