The Lost Art of Catholic Drinking
#11
I think the puritan treatment of alcohol as inherently evil is an anachronism.  Water was not a practical beverage; beer and wine and spirits were necessarily drunk. 
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#12
gjwalberg Wrote:The author says that Catholics enjoy moderation in drinking.

Hooey, I say.

Ladies and Gentlemen, consider Ireland.

Moderation?

IRELAND.

That is all.

lmao
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#13
gjwalberg Wrote:The author says that Catholics enjoy moderation in drinking.

Hooey, I say.

Ladies and Gentlemen, consider Ireland.

Moderation?

IRELAND.

That is all.

Why don't you come take a look-see for yourself.  Take a detour through the Highlands of Scotland first, staunch Presbyterians and Wee Frees.  There, it's bad manners to stop drinking before you fall under the table.  [Image: shrug.gif] Next on to England, where you get drunk enough to let old colonial attitudes fall out and take to the streets yelling with your silly fat gut hanging out of your opened shirt [Image: eyes.gif].  Suddenly those Presbys don't seem so bad.  At least they are good humoured drunks and sing in tune.

Then make your way to Ireland. 
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#14
We all have a tendency to think beliefs and ways of life come from nowhere. Hopefully the linked article will provide a little background concerning drinking habits among Catholic and Protestant Americans. Somewhat related to the original article and pretty interesting:

http://www.indiana.edu/~engs/articles/cathprot.htm
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#15
gjwalberg Wrote:The author says that Catholics enjoy moderation in drinking.

Hooey, I say.

Ladies and Gentlemen, consider Ireland.

Moderation?

IRELAND.

That is all.

Haha, shame that every second Irishman I’ve ever met is a raging alcoholic.  I’m not talking about people with Irish background, but most of the green-blooded fiddle-de-dum-fiddle-de-dees have suffered from some degree of alcoholism.

 

It’s true that many great men and women of the Church have been occupational piss-pots.  Some may remember, for example, the story of how St. Monica’s family (and doubtless many like them) used to have wine with their lunch every day!  The difference is, in my opinion, that Christians in those days were simple, holy, truly happy people with a deep love of and devotion to God in their hearts.  Not so in our complicated days of confusion and despair. 

 

One truly great Irishman was the (hopefully one day to be Saint) Willie Doyle, SJ, who was never known to touch a drop of grog in his life. He was anything but a puritan but he saw the terrible, terrible scourge that alcohol has been in Ireland and he encouraged all the men he came into contact with to likewise abstain.

 

I personally have seen many lives in my family ruined by grog and I think with all the misery and confusion in today’s society, it’s too easy for alcohol to become an escape and for “moderation” to be taken very loosely.  Better to abstain completely or drink very little.

 

Don’t mean to be a killjoy or puritan.  Just a different view of things.  I raise my chocolate milkshake to you all!

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#16
For heavens' sake, I have had wine with my dinner frequently since I was a child.  I have certainly had wine occasionally with meals since I was five.  And am I a raging alcoholic?
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#17

DJMitch, a bit of respect for others' opinions would not go astray.

 

The fact that you are not an alcoholic does not change any of the points I made.  I hardly claimed that everyone who drinks frequently will become an alcoholic.  I merely made a point about the tendency of Catholics to venerate alcohol and the dangers that come with it.

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#18
Wherever there are three or four Catholics, there is usually a fifth.

[Image: laff.gif]

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#19
Eh?  [Image: dunce.gif]
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#20
Viscount Slurpee, I am sorry if I offended you.  I meant no disrespect to you.
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