Easter Desserts?
#11
Here is a recipe for pascha. This is traditional in many Eastern Catholic and Orthodox homes. Not to be made or eaten if you're worried about calories!


Ingredients[*]2 lbs pressed cottage cheese(no salt)
  • 3 lbs cream cheese
  • 10  egg yolks
  • 1/2 lb unsalted butter
  • 1 pint whipping cream
  • 3 1/2 cups fine sugar
  • 5(9g)packages vanilla sugar, we use oetker original vanilla sugar Directions
    1. Mix yolks and whip cream over double boiler until it coats the spoon. Stir in vanilla sugar.
    2. Press cottage cheese, cream cheese, and butter through a ricer or sieve.
    3. In batches, place cheese mixture in mixing bowl and slowly add yolks until smooth. Add fine sugar and blend into mixture.
    4. Combine bowls and mix.
    5. Place in small containers, loosely cover in plastic, then a cheese cloth and a weight. For the weight, we use a plastic margarine container filled with water.
    The only change I would make to this is that I use a regular terra cotta flower pot instead of small containers. Place the finished mixture in the pot, place the pot in a pie pan to catch the draining and put a saucer on top of the mixture with a weight to press out the liquid. When drained, run a knife around the pascha to loosen and tip out onto serving plate.  
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    #12
    That pascha sounds great. I guess it's a kind of custard? I thought before that it was bread.
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    #13
    Satori Wrote:That pascha sounds great. I guess it's a kind of custard? I thought before that it was bread.
     Some people use the same name for Easter bread. It's actually sort of a REALLY rich cheese cake!
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    #14
    Russian Easterbread is called Koolitch. It is baked in a can so it rises up to resemble an Easter candle.
     The sweet creamy spread is called Pashka. It is traditionally put in a special wooden mold which has carved Easter symbols so that the finished product is beautiful!!!

     I have made both and they are great! I need to buy a mold.

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    #15
    HappyWife Wrote:Russian Easterbread is called Koolitch. It is baked in a can so it rises up to resemble an Easter candle.
     The sweet creamy spread is called Pashka. It is traditionally put in a special wooden mold which has carved Easter symbols so that the finished product is beautiful!!!

     I have made both and they are great! I need to buy a mold.
     I forgot about Kulich! Let me see if I can find a recipe! ***Edit** Recipe follows: Ingredients[*]1/2 cup milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, sifted twice
  • 1(1/4ounce)package active dry yeast
  • 1/3 cup water, lukewarm(105 to 115 degrees F)
  • 9 large egg yolks
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons Cointreau liqueur
  • 2 tablespoons brandy
  • orange, juice and zest of, grated
  • 1 1/2 large vanilla beans, split lengthwise
  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled to lukewarm
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 1/2 cup almonds, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 large egg white Directions
    1. 1In a medium sized saucepan, bring the milk to a boil over medium heat. Remove from the heat and add the honey and oil, stirring until the honey is dissolved.
    2. 2Gradually add ½ cup of the flour, beating until the mixture is completely smooth. Cool to lukewarm.
    3. 3In a large bowl, add the yeast to the water, stir, and let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes.
    4. 4Add the milk and flour mixture to the yeast and stir until smooth. Cover with a linen or cotton kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place until the sponge doubles in bulk, about 1 hour.
    5. 5In a second large bowl, beat the egg yolks and the sugar until thick and pale yellow. Add the nutmeg, cardamom, vanilla extract, Cointreau, brandy, orange zest and orange juice and beat for a few more seconds.
    6. 6Scrape out the seeds from the vanilla beans and add them to the yolk mixture. Add the butter, raisins, almonds, and almond extract.
    7. 7With a clean, dry beater, beat the egg white until it forms soft peaks and fold it into the egg yolk mixture.
    8. 8Combine the yolk mixture with the risen sponge and mix gently, but thoroughly. Using an electric mixer, gradually beat in the remaining 4 cups flour until you have a very smooth, loose dough. Transfer the dough to a clean, well greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, 1 ½ hours.
    9. 9Cut two 1 ½ inch strips of parchment paper, each long enough to be molded down one side, then across the bottom and up the opposite side of a clean 2 pound coffee tin. The ends should extend above the top of the tin. Butter the tin and the strips, then set them into the tin crisscross to each other. Fold the ends over the outside of the tin.
    10. 10Punch the dough down and place it in the tin. Let rise again, covered, until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.
    11. 11While the dough is rising, preheat the oven to 325°F.
    12. 12Bake the kulich until it is golden brown and a cake tester comes out clean, about 1 hour to 1 hour 10 minutes. Cool slightly, then carefully lift the kulich from the tin by pulling up on the ends of the parchment strips. Remove the parchment and let the kulich cool on a rack.
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