Absinthe is back (in the US)
#1
LOL- I've always wanted to try this after I saw an Anthony Bourdain show about it.  Absinthe, famed 'green fairy' drink of bohemians, is back

By Don Mayhew , The Fresno Bee (Fresno, Calif.)
Sunday, March 30, 2008<SCRIPT language=javascript> LoadRelated(); </SCRIPT>

The phrase "think green" is supposed to stir ecologically friendly mental images of clean air, unpolluted streams and lush foliage.

But for this country's lovers of absinthe, the term has an entirely different meaning. The U.S. ban on the liquor, known by devotees as the Green Fairy, has been lifted after more than eight decades.

While it's unlikely that the anise-flavored aperitif, which more than a century ago in France rivaled wine in popularity, will ever again enjoy that kind of widespread acceptance, the people who drink absinthe display an extraordinary passion for it.

That has as much to do with the lore and ceremony surrounding the drink as the flavor itself, which can be bitter and complex - a nice way of saying it's often an acquired taste.

"It's not particularly flavorful," says Ken Fugelsang, an enology professor at California State University, Fresno, who touches on the distillation of absinthe during his wine production class. "It can be very bitter."

But what absinthe lacks in savory sweetness, it more than makes up for in cultural cachet.

It was the choice of drink by many of the influential artists and writers of La Belle Epoque, among them Toulouse-Latrec and Paul Verlaine. Edgar Degas and Pablo Picasso painted it. It's said Van Gogh was driven to cut off his ear while under its influence.

Add to that the elaborate way absinthe is traditionally served - either set afire with a sugarcube or mixed with chilled water poured over a sugarcube - and you've got an intriguing drink.

"I just pulled up eBay," Fugelsang says. "There were no fewer than 58 different absinthe kits and spoons and special sugars to use."

Marcel Nunis, Fresno playwright and founder of the Rogue Festival, first tried absinthe six years ago.

"The theater of the whole thing is attractive," he says. "When you have to burn something, it just looks illegal."

 
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#2
Yay!  I've always been curious about it.  I wonder where it will be available?
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#3
I've had it, a friend of mine brought it back from a trip to Czech Republic.  Blech.  I did not like it at all-- because I do not like the taste of Black Licorice and Feet.

But if that's how you roll, I've got some Jagermeister that I'll pour through some gym socks, if you'd like to swill it for a while... [Image: skullbones.gif][Image: skullbones.gif][Image: skullbones.gif][Image: skullbones.gif][Image: mementomori.gif][Image: skullbones.gif][Image: skullbones.gif][Image: mementomori.gif][Image: mementomori.gif][Image: mementomori.gif][Image: mementomori.gif][Image: skullbones.gif][Image: skullbones.gif]
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#4
I enjoy it thoroughly. I am a first generation American, the rest of my family being German, so I've always just had a cousin send it over. This will be much easier, haha. Sadly, it's legality will take away a little of the mystique it has when sharing it with friends for the first time. But only a little.
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#5
Unfortunately, I don't think this is the real stuff.  You're not getting the drink served in the French cafes years ago.
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#6
No wormwood, but being around 110 proof...who needs it?

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#7
Paloma Wrote:No wormwood, but being around 110 proof...who needs it?
Where do they say that there is no wormwood? I know that for some time they have been producing "absinthe" in the States with much lower quantities of thujone, but this sounds to me like they are finally permitting the real deal once more.
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#8
actiofidei Wrote:
Paloma Wrote:No wormwood, but being around 110 proof...who needs it?
Where do they say that there is no wormwood? I know that for some time they have been producing "absinthe" in the States with much lower quantities of thujone, but this sounds to me like they are finally permitting the real deal once more.

Thujone in food products is still illegal but the Absinthe lobby has convinced the FDA to allow it in Absinthe as long as it remains at 10 parts per million. I could be wrong. I get my information from pretentious nerds.
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#9
Paloma Wrote:
actiofidei Wrote:
Paloma Wrote:No wormwood, but being around 110 proof...who needs it?
Where do they say that there is no wormwood? I know that for some time they have been producing "absinthe" in the States with much lower quantities of thujone, but this sounds to me like they are finally permitting the real deal once more.

Thujone in food products is still illegal but the Absinthe lobby has convinced the FDA to allow it in Absinthe as long as it remains at 10 parts per million. I could be wrong. I get my information from pretentious nerds.

lol, fair enough. I was aware of this legislation, but thought that it was old news. This article led me to believe that there was newer legislation allowing it.
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#10
I propose we name Absinthe the official drink of the 2008 Election! [Image: margarita.gif]
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