Catholic way to sign off letters
#11
digitalcatholic Wrote:since the time of my seminary formation and today as a priest, I usually sign off unofficial correspondence:

Pax, or Pax Christi,

another one is:

In Union of Prayer,

or:

Pax et Bonum,

but the "official" one I use is the standard:

Sincerely Yours in Christ,

Pax,
Fr. Chris
catholicunderground.com
 Welcome to FE, Father!
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#12
jonkknox Wrote:Mine's always "In Jesus and Mary", and a good friend also uses "In the Sacred and Immaculate Hearts of Jesus and Mary"

Not being a Latin scholar, what would the ecclesiastical Latin forms of those be? 
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#13
Miquelot Wrote:Not being a Latin scholar, what would the ecclesiastical Latin forms of those be?

I believe those would be:

In Jesu et Maria,
and
In sacratissimi et immaculati cordibus Jesu et Mariae is my guess. I'll have to ask my seminarian friend to check me.

Edit: Unless a Latin scholar here could proffer a translation, of course.
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#14
When I can expect my recipient to understand the Greek initials:

In IC XC,

Gabriel

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#15
I normally sign mine with "In Christo Rege et Maria Regina,"

Also, if it's a long or formal letter (or to a friend I know to appreciate religious things) I start it with "Gratia vobis [tibi] et pax a Deo Patre nostro et Domino Iesu Christo" which translates as "Grace to you, and peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ." (I Cor 1,3)

Sooner or later I think I'm going to start concluding my letters to priests with things such as "In conclusion I kiss Your Reverence's hand...". Angel

In Christo Rege et Maria Regina,
    ~Steven

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#16
If I am to assume that "Fratus tuus in Christo" is "Sincerely yours in Christ," can I assume signing a letter "In Christ" but in Latin is "In Christo"? 
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#17
Miquelot Wrote:If I am to assume that "Fratus tuus in Christo" is "Sincerely yours in Christ," can I assume signing a letter "In Christ" but in Latin is "In Christo"? 

Be careful with Latin, it is highly inflected. However, I do think that is correct as Christo has the same case and I do not think prepositions have any inflection.
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#18
LaRoza Wrote:
Miquelot Wrote:If I am to assume that "Fratus tuus in Christo" is "Sincerely yours in Christ," can I assume signing a letter "In Christ" but in Latin is "In Christo"? 

Be careful with Latin, it is highly inflected. However, I do think that is correct as Christo has the same case and I do not think prepositions have any inflection.

I thought something like that might be the case, which is why I thought that I would be better off asking.  Thank you. 
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#19
Miquelot Wrote:If I am to assume that "Fratus tuus in Christo" is "Sincerely yours in Christ,"

It means, "Your brother in Christ."
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#20
Credo Wrote:
Miquelot Wrote:If I am to assume that "Fratus tuus in Christo" is "Sincerely yours in Christ,"

It means, "Your brother in Christ."
What I really wanted to translate into Latin was "Sincerely yours in Christ"; Oops.  I guess that I can't claim, "It's Greek to me"; I never claimed to be any Latin scholar. 
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