Aspergers and ADHD
#31
AdoramusTeChriste Wrote:FYI, you aren't the only poster on this (or the other) thread. It looked to me as if some of the posters could use a prayer or two to help them with the challenges they are facing, as evidenced by their posts.
I know, I hope I didn't seem to be detracting from that. Too bad we can't have comment posts, which specifically comments on a post rather than responding to it (well, it does exist, but not in the clear cut why I think would be more apparent).

Quote: My prayers were not offered to change you, Laroza. They were offered to ask Christ's blessing of peace in the homes of the fisheaters who need God's help.

Honestly. Who doesn't need an extra prayer now and again? Regardless, I am sorry if you were offended.

I wasn't offended. I just don't like seeing AS as being something that needs to be changed. Those with the AS personality do indeed have problems with society (and society has problems with them) and it can and does cause many family issues.
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#32
I'm getting tested for Asperger's within the next week or so, so I can't speak definitively until then, but I'm fairly sure that I have it.

In response to the first post, I'll say that it hasn't been a terrible cross for me, both because I'm highly operative, and probably because I didn't really notice that people behaved strangely around me. But since I've learned about Asperger's, I'm much more aware of the things I tend to do that make people uncomfortable, and I've been able with much success, to correct a lot of the problems.  I'll say too that I'm a least a little blessed to (possibly) have it, because as has been alluded to already, I've no real interest in drowning myself in emotions and relationships, but I do understand that this can and does hurt those around me sometimes. I think the best help is just self-knowledge and openness. Denial is no fun, and I think Asperger's is quite a bit of fun to boot.
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#33
Quaesumus Wrote:I'm getting tested for Asperger's within the next week or so, so I can't speak definitively until then, but I'm fairly sure that I have it.
There is a test? Good luck and study!

Quote:In response to the first post, I'll say that it hasn't been a terrible cross for me, both because I'm highly operative, and probably because I didn't really notice that people behaved strangely around me.
If you are complying with the rules of this forum, you are over 18, which means the worst of it is likely past. Puberty is the hardest part, especially in public schools.

Quote: But since I've learned about Asperger's, I'm much more aware of the things I tend to do that make people uncomfortable, and I've been able with much success, to correct a lot of the problems.  I'll say too that I'm a least a little blessed to (possibly) have it, because as has been alluded to already, I've no real interest in drowning myself in emotions and relationships, but I do understand that this can and does hurt those around me sometimes.
That can be hard. I am very uncomfortable when people die. Not because they are dead, but because I really don't want to hurt people's (living) feelings, so I avoid them. I really can't say "I'm sorry" as that sounds stupid to me (makes me think I'm professing guilt) so I tend to make a promise of prayers and pretend to be quiet to avoid seeming un-feeling.

Quote: I think the best help is just self-knowledge and openness. Denial is no fun, and I think Asperger's is quite a bit of fun to boot.

It could be worse, you could be normal. :)
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#34
La Roza, you keep saying it's a bad thing to be normal...I don't get it.
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#35
I'm curious about some of LaRoza's remarks. Are people with Aspergers unemotional or something? I don't think I've ever known one personally.
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#36
Quaesumus Wrote:La Roza, you keep saying it's a bad thing to be normal...I don't get it.

Not bad by itself, but certainly not desirable by itself.
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#37
Satori Wrote:I'm curious about some of LaRoza's remarks. Are people with Aspergers unemotional or something? I don't think I've ever known one personally.

Not unemotional (schizoid personality disorder: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizoid_pe...y_disorder) but different.

The problems with AS come from reactions by society and to society. It isn't a disorder, but a big difference. You probably do know or have known people with AS or that could be described as AS.

Think of an absent minded professor, socially awkward geek, or something like that.
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#38
I worked with a woman with AS at my last job, a bank.  Some people made fun of her because she was... weird.  But she was also razor-sharp, fast at her work, and rarely made any mistakes.  She ended up reviewing the work of a half-dozen people under her (not management, more like a test-grader of sorts).  She was odd, smelled kind of bad, and she would only talk to someone if she held a sheet of typing paper over her face. 

But if the place burned down, she's the only one I'd go back in to rescue.

I've never met a more genuinely good person in my life, even though her AS often ended up causing her a lot of disarray among her less-than-friendly coworkers.
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#39
LaRoza Wrote:
Satori Wrote:I'm curious about some of LaRoza's remarks. Are people with Aspergers unemotional or something? I don't think I've ever known one personally.

Not unemotional (schizoid personality disorder: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizoid_pe...y_disorder) but different.

The problems with AS come from reactions by society and to society. It isn't a disorder, but a big difference. You probably do know or have known people with AS or that could be described as AS.

Think of an absent minded professor, socially awkward geek, or something like that.

Oh. I like people like that. They mean what they say and don't play games. And they ask real questions.
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#40
Satori Wrote:
LaRoza Wrote:
Satori Wrote:I'm curious about some of LaRoza's remarks. Are people with Aspergers unemotional or something? I don't think I've ever known one personally.

Not unemotional (schizoid personality disorder: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizoid_pe...y_disorder) but different.

The problems with AS come from reactions by society and to society. It isn't a disorder, but a big difference. You probably do know or have known people with AS or that could be described as AS.

Think of an absent minded professor, socially awkward geek, or something like that.

Oh. I like people like that. They mean what they say and don't play games. And they ask real questions.

Sounds exactly like Dr. Thomas More from Walker Percy's books...
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