Holy Toast
#1
... or should this go in Pig Roast?  (I'm feeling an E-Bay sideline coming on...) 

From this place:

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Holy Toast

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it can also be the most miraculous. Push this plastic miracle maker into your piece of bread, remove it, then put the bread into the toaster and "presto," instant amazement and awe! As it cooks, the distinct outline of the Virgin Mary will appear in the bread. When you serve it, they won't know whether to eat it with some grape jelly or build it a shrine.

 

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#2
Traditional Catholics, especially Polish and Slavic Catholics, can stick with this Holy Toast: :)   [Image: oplatki_w_koszyczku.jpg]Before serving the Christmas meal, the mother sprinkles holy water on the table and the rest of the house that the blessing of God might rest on them. The father serves an oplatka (wafer) to each family member starting with his wife. He asks her forgiveness for any hurt he may have caused and invites reconciliation with an embrace and a kiss. The mother does likewise to her husband. The father then takes a little honey and makes a small sign of the cross on the foreheads of all present. It reminds all to keep Christ in our thoughts and to live and work so that harmony and pleasant fellowship might sweeten our lives. The meal begins with the "oplatky" or unleavened wafers imprinted with scenes of the holy birth. Coming from the Latin, "oblata" (offering), these wafers are common to Slavs living in the Tatra Mountains. Both Poles and Slovaks, who live on either side of Europe's second highest mountain range, forming the natural boundry between Slovakia and Poland, use these wafers at the Christmas Eve supper. Because of the snowbound conditions of the region, these blessed wafers were given to the faithful by the village priest so that this symbol of Christ and the Eucharist might serve as their Christmas Eve spiritual nourishment. It is customary for each family in the village to contribute a measure of flour for the baking of the "oplatky" done for the entire village on December 13, the day after the Feast of St. Lucy. If there was a common mill in the village, the miller saw to it that flour from the storehouse was provided. After baking, the "oplatky" were blessed by the village priest and distributed to each family by children who were sent by the priest. The children presented each family with the "oplatky" together with a memorized Christmas greeting "Vina." Because of the often snowbound conditions in these villages, which prevented the villagers from traveling to church for the Midnight liturgy, these blessed wafers were enjoyed as a reminder of the Eucharist. The "oplatky" are eaten with honey and reminded the family of the unleavened bread of the Passover supper of the Israelites.



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#3
Would it be improper for me to adopt this charming custom for my family even though we are of Western European descent?
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#4
Satori Wrote:Would it be improper for me to adopt this charming custom for my family even though we are of Western European descent?

I have a Slavic family who has adopted me (or maybe I adopted them?).

It wouldn't officially be Christmas without my oplatky!  ;)

- Lisa
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#5
What do they taste like?
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#6
Satori Wrote:What do they taste like?

Like Holy Communion, very bland, almost cardboard-ish. Thus, the honey.

- Lisa
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#7
Lisa, I checked out that link. Have you had experience buying oplatky from this shop? Perhaps I'll buy some from them this year.
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#8
Satori Wrote:Lisa, I checked out that link. Have you had experience buying oplatky from this shop? Perhaps I'll buy some from them this year.

No, I have no experience buying from that shop. But I'm sure it's fine. I googled "oplatky" so I could get the information to put here. I don't know if my Slovak friend makes them herself or orders them online. Most of her family still resides in East Europe and they might send her these things. I'll ask her.
 
Every Easter, she makes me up a basket filled with items that symbolize the passion and resurrection of our Lord; sausage, beets, salt, vinegar, cheese, and butter in the shape of a lamb. "Pysanky" are the elaborately decorated Easter eggs. There are also Oplatky Easter wafers, similar to the Christmas wafers only they have a picture of the risen Christ on them. You can find all this on the same link. There are so many fun things here.
 
Click here: Easter in Slovakia  - Lisa
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#9
PS: You can sprinkle a little powdered sugar on the Oplatky to make them taste sweet.

- Lisa
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#10
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I went to the site you linked, and while the Holy Toast doesn't do much for me I'm rather fascinated by the Jesus Band-Aids! LOL
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