Cooking.....
#61
Theresa Wrote:Satori,

I really, really enjoy looking through cook books.  I have quite a collection.  My problem is that I want to try everything, especially the desserts.
 
One of my books is an antique.  It gives instructions on how to start your wood fire!  
(Does that mean that woman were more manly then?)  

I love collecting antique cookbooks. My favorite is one titled "The Art of Cooking and Serving." It gives you directions for running a household both with and without servants and what proper day and evening attire is for the help. It also gives guidelines for a proper luncheon menu (4-5 courses) which I thought was hilarious and ever since, I try to call lunch, "luncheon." My fam just thinks I'm weird and my kids think I'm saying " lunchin' " like its a verb.

One problem with antique cookbooks though is that the ingredients aren't the same. Flour and shortening cook differently now than they did 80 years ago. It can be a real problem when it comes to baking.

Plus, some ingredients no longer exist. I hate it when I come across an old recipe I want to try and it calls for a pound of suet. Good luck finding that!
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#62
Theresa, I love cookbooks, too, especially the ones that have little stories to go with the recipes. I think you would really enjoy "The Little House Cookbook," especially if you liked the Laura Ingalls Wilder books when you were a little girl. This is full of historical information about food that will make you really appreciate your grocery store and your modern oven.

Do I think women were more manly then? Ha! You have exactly touched upon a point I often think of when reading some of the threads on here about how a woman should behave in order to be feminine and attractive to men. I'm always thinking, "That would never have worked for our foremothers unless they were all aristocrats with lots of servants to do the dirty work for them!" Being feminine obviously cannot mean being frail and incompetent, as you of course know. Women would never have been able to do "women's work" if that were the case!

But back to the subject at hand ... Are you familiar with "From a Monastery Kitchen"? That's another favorite of mine, a beautiful little book written by a Benedictine monk who is the cook in his monastery. It's divided up according to the seasons and is mostly vegetarian with a few fish dishes. Excellent for Friday meals! And all sorts of special desserts for saints' feast days -- you'd love it! Yes, when I get a new cookbook I always want to make all the desserts, too, and I get excited and go to the store and buy lots of butter and condensed milk and nuts and so forth. 
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#63
Paloma Wrote:Plus, some ingredients no longer exist. I hate it when I come across an old recipe I want to try and it calls for a pound of suet. Good luck finding that!
 Paloma, ask in the meat department of any major supermarket. They probably save it to be shipped to be made into bird feeders, but it's USDA Grade A just like the beef it came from and they'd probably be happy to sell you a pound or two. I know I've never had any problem finding it.
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#64
Paloma Wrote:
Theresa Wrote:Satori,

I really, really enjoy looking through cook books.  I have quite a collection.  My problem is that I want to try everything, especially the desserts.
 
One of my books is an antique.  It gives instructions on how to start your wood fire!  
(Does that mean that woman were more manly then?)  

I love collecting antique cookbooks. My favorite is one titled "The Art of Cooking and Serving." It gives you directions for running a household both with and without servants and what proper day and evening attire is for the help. It also gives guidelines for a proper luncheon menu (4-5 courses) which I thought was hilarious and ever since, I try to call lunch, "luncheon." My fam just thinks I'm weird and my kids think I'm saying " lunchin' " like its a verb.

One problem with antique cookbooks though is that the ingredients aren't the same. Flour and shortening cook differently now than they did 80 years ago. It can be a real problem when it comes to baking.

Plus, some ingredients no longer exist. I hate it when I come across an old recipe I want to try and it calls for a pound of suet. Good luck finding that!

Damn, damn, damn! I was going to get on here and ask if anyone knew where I could find suet. I have a couple of English cookbooks (modern) that have lots of dessert recipes calling for suet. Apparently you can still get it in the UK. I even went to my neighborhood butcher shop and asked if I could buy some suet, but the closest they had was rendered beef fat. I used it, but I don't think it cooks up the same. Maybe I could order some from one of those online grocers? I'll let you know if I find a source!

Ah, yes, funny old-fashioned words for things fill me with glee. I'm still looking for an excuse to serve a meal called "tiffin."
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#65
Quote: I think you would really enjoy "The Little House Cookbook,"

Are you familiar with "From a Monastery Kitchen"?

Thank you for the recommendations, Satori.  I almost ordered  From a Monastery Kitchen.  They also have a soup book, I believe.   I will keep them in mind, though   I do have a couple of Catholic cookbooks already:  Carmelite Cookery II and Feast Day Cookbook.  From this last one, I got the idea to go all out for St. Joseph's feast day.  I even made the bread shaped as a beard.  Our guests  were totally delighted!  It really is a fun book.

 
Quote:..and I get excited and go to the store and buy lots of butter and condensed milk and nuts and so forth.

Yes! and whipping cream, chocolate chips, limes, fresh coconut, gelatin...
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#66
Satori Wrote:I even went to my neighborhood butcher shop and asked if I could buy some suet, but the closest they had was rendered beef fat. I used it, but I don't think it cooks up the same.
It might not, since suet is raw beef fat.  Once it's rendered, it's called tallow.  I'm surprised a butcher shop didn't have it.  Maybe they just don't keep it on hand, but could save some for you if you asked?  Our butcher shop gives pork fat away free to anyone who wants to render lard.

Quote:Being feminine obviously cannot mean being frail and incompetent, as you of course know. Women would never have been able to do "women's work" if that were the case!
There's a good book on this topic called Never Done[Image: ir?t=buttham-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0805067744], by Susan Strasser.  It's exhausting just reading about the amount of water women hauled into the house before indoor plumbing.  I don't know how my grandmothers did it all: cooking, cleaning, babies, laundry, gardens, chickens, sewing....  I think my mom's amazing, and she has electricity and hot-and-cold running water to help!

People don't know how to make popcorn?  Egad.  Put some fat in a large heavy pot with a lid and get it hot, toss in the popcorn, and wait for it to pop.  You'll need about a tablespoon of fat for every 1/3 to 1/2 cup of unpopped popcorn.  Use a good quality saturated fat like coconut oil or lard, that won't break down under high heat.  When the popping slows down, shake to pot to help uncooked kernels fall to the bottom and pop.  When the popping stops for a few seconds, it's done.

I miss popcorn, maybe more than anything else from my grain-eating days.  It's just not the same eating butter straight.
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#67
Satori Wrote:Damn, damn, damn! I was going to get on here and ask if anyone knew where I could find suet. I have a couple of English cookbooks (modern) that have lots of dessert recipes calling for suet. Apparently you can still get it in the UK. I even went to my neighborhood butcher shop and asked if I could buy some suet, but the closest they had was rendered beef fat. I used it, but I don't think it cooks up the same. Maybe I could order some from one of those online grocers? I'll let you know if I find a source!

This wiki article on suet should be interesting to you, Satori.  Since suet is raw beef fat (usually from around the kidneys) it isn't very stable and doesn't store for long.  In order to increase stability the ground up suet is dried and mixed with flour before being packaged.  Modern cookbooks in the UK will usually refer to the packaged suet and not fresh raw suet.  So even if you found it in your local butcher's shop it wouldn't be what the recipe called for.  Conversely if all you can find is packaged suet and you have an old cookbook then you're going to have the problem that the suet/flour ratio in the old recipe will be different as it was based on fresh suet.
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#68
In England I was watching my friend's grandmother make mincemeat pie and she took a pile of what I thought was shredded cheese out of the fridge.  Until then I'd never seen suet in my life, and she was delighted to tell me all about it.  I told her about Crisco, but she wasn't convinced.  Around Christmas time the old neighbor ladies used to race each other to the butchers to get the fresh suet, usually there was a line out front.  
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#69
frerejacques Wrote:In England I was watching my friend's grandmother make mincemeat pie and she took a pile of what I thought was shredded cheese out of the fridge.  Until then I'd never seen suet in my life, and she was delighted to tell me all about it.  I told her about Crisco, but she wasn't convinced.  Around Christmas time the old neighbor ladies used to race each other to the butchers to get the fresh suet, usually there was a line out front.  

How'd that suet-y mincemeat pie taste?
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#70
Satori Wrote:
frerejacques Wrote:In England I was watching my friend's grandmother make mincemeat pie and she took a pile of what I thought was shredded cheese out of the fridge.  Until then I'd never seen suet in my life, and she was delighted to tell me all about it.  I told her about Crisco, but she wasn't convinced.  Around Christmas time the old neighbor ladies used to race each other to the butchers to get the fresh suet, usually there was a line out front.  

How'd that suet-y mincemeat pie taste?

In the oven the mincemeat pie smelled like roast beef and apple cinnamon raisin, so I offered to walk the dog to get out of the house!  [Image: laff.gif]  She made a banoffee pie as well, and as I wasn't yet fully vegan, I indulged.  It was magic!  Here's a link to a good recipe, if you've never had it:

http://appleandspice.blogspot.com/2008/0...e-pie.html

  
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