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#71
I wanted to make a Christmas pudding (recipe from 1950 Betty Crocker) but it called for suet. I tried to find a substitution but every source I found said that there aren't any. Anything other than suet will turn your recipe into a hot greasy mess.

My guess is you would have to make friends with a cattle rancher/butcher. Most modern butcher shops don't get the whole cow nowadays. I know one really good old school butcher within an hours drive and I imagine I could special order it (If I was that desperate for pudding.) I've been wanting to go halfsies on a steer with someone but I keep changing my mind because I hear you get a ton of ground beef (which I am not fond of.)

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#72
Paloma, most butcher shops will package the beef "to-order", not just give you a bunch of ground beef, unless that is what you want.

Roy
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#73
Yeah, not that much of the meat will end up ground if you don't want it to.  I dug out the order slip from our last half-of-a-half, and we got 26 pounds of ground beef out of 172 pounds of meat.  The rest was:

12 T-bone steaks
12 rib-eye steaks
4 sirloin steaks
4 steaks for swissing
8 round steaks
2 sirloin tip roasts (all roasts appr. 3 lbs.)
1 heel of round roast
1 rump roast
4 chuck roasts
2 arm roasts
10 pounds of stew meat
heart, liver, and tongue

There might have been a few more things that could have been cuts or stew meat, but we use quite a bit of ground beef.

If you lived in the western Illinois area, I could set you up with a part of a steer (or hog) next month.  It's worth checking Local Harvest for your area if you haven't yet. There are more sources for locally-grown and custom processed meat than people often realize, and new ones are popping up all the time.
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#74
Grocery store butchers can order pretty much anything you want, so if you ask for suet, they can can deliver a little processed beef fat within a couple days.  They probably don't have any laying around, but you can ask and they should be able to deliver.

In Kansas, you often find suet in the meat departments around this time of the year since it's good bird food during the winter.
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#75
and a partridge in a pear tree!

EDIT:

I was responding to Mhoram's post, not GoG's.
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#76
Okay guys, adventures in suet, part two:

I went to my neighborhood whole foods store today, which has a fairly nice meat department. Asked if they carried suet. Young man at the counter didn't know what that was. Turns out he was the meat manager, so I'm a bit puzzled ... but I explained that it's the fat around beef kidneys. They don't carry it, but I asked if he'd speak to the beef farmer with whom he does business about getting me some, and he said he would. Can't imagine said beef farmer wouldn't be delighted to take care of my fat needs, so I'm optimistic. Young man said he'd call tomorrow. Waiting.

Carol, no, I'm near certain that the English cookbooks I have are calling for fresh suet. The recipes specify "shredded" suet, you see. Well, well, if the meat manager comes through for me, I may be able to make spotted dick and I'll tell you if it's like the ones I ate in England.

Frere Jacques, call me crazy, but the only banana dessert I like is Bananas Foster.
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#77
Mhoram Wrote:Yeah, not that much of the meat will end up ground if you don't want it to.  I dug out the order slip from our last half-of-a-half, and we got 26 pounds of ground beef out of 172 pounds of meat.  The rest was:

12 T-bone steaks
12 rib-eye steaks
4 sirloin steaks
4 steaks for swissing
8 round steaks
2 sirloin tip roasts (all roasts appr. 3 lbs.)
1 heel of round roast
1 rump roast
4 chuck roasts
2 arm roasts
10 pounds of stew meat
heart, liver, and tongue

There might have been a few more things that could have been cuts or stew meat, but we use quite a bit of ground beef.

If you lived in the western Illinois area, I could set you up with a part of a steer (or hog) next month.  It's worth checking Local Harvest for your area if you haven't yet. There are more sources for locally-grown and custom processed meat than people often realize, and new ones are popping up all the time.

I love the grass fed beef from central CA. We used to make the 6 hour drive round trip just to buy ribs in San Luis Obispo. So I looked into ranchers around there and found a guy that would deliver it to me for no extra charge. I was told I'd end up with about 30 lbs of ground beef on 1/4 steer. I'm not totally opposed to it but I'm not excited either about the prospect of having to eat 30 lbs of ground beef within the next year. So I keep putting it off. I can only handle so much meatloaf, spaghetti, hamburgers, and tacos. But next time I'll ask the guy if there is a way to get less ground. And I'll ask him about the suet. :)

I kept envisioning the I Love Lucy episode where Lucy accidently buys a whole steer and ends up trying to sell it on the "black market" before Ricky finds out.
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#78
Satori Wrote:Carol, no, I'm near certain that the English cookbooks I have are calling for fresh suet. The recipes specify "shredded" suet, you see. Well, well, if the meat manager comes through for me, I may be able to make spotted dick and I'll tell you if it's like the ones I ate in England.

Satori,

If they're asking for "shredded suet" and the cookbooks are recent publications then they are probably talking about packaged suet, which has shredded suet mixed with flour.  Like the Atora brand which is clarified beef fat/suet and wheat flour. 

If that is the case using fresh suet will give a considerably different result in the recipe.
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#79
I just checked my English cookbook. It's made for American cooks, but blithely assumes that we still have purveyors of quality meats on a grand, ex-supermarket scale and can just saunter into the corner butcher's shop for a pound of suet, which the author instructs us on how to shred once we have purchased it.

So if the meat manager at the whole foods market comes through for me, no problem. I'll have fresh, locally harvested suet to work with and will only have to get over my distaste at handling raw beef. 
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#80
Paloma Wrote:
Mhoram Wrote:Yeah, not that much of the meat will end up ground if you don't want it to.  I dug out the order slip from our last half-of-a-half, and we got 26 pounds of ground beef out of 172 pounds of meat.  The rest was:

12 T-bone steaks
12 rib-eye steaks
4 sirloin steaks
4 steaks for swissing
8 round steaks
2 sirloin tip roasts (all roasts appr. 3 lbs.)
1 heel of round roast
1 rump roast
4 chuck roasts
2 arm roasts
10 pounds of stew meat
heart, liver, and tongue

There might have been a few more things that could have been cuts or stew meat, but we use quite a bit of ground beef.

If you lived in the western Illinois area, I could set you up with a part of a steer (or hog) next month.  It's worth checking Local Harvest for your area if you haven't yet. There are more sources for locally-grown and custom processed meat than people often realize, and new ones are popping up all the time.

I love the grass fed beef from central CA. We used to make the 6 hour drive round trip just to buy ribs in San Luis Obispo. So I looked into ranchers around there and found a guy that would deliver it to me for no extra charge. I was told I'd end up with about 30 lbs of ground beef on 1/4 steer. I'm not totally opposed to it but I'm not excited either about the prospect of having to eat 30 lbs of ground beef within the next year. So I keep putting it off. I can only handle so much meatloaf, spaghetti, hamburgers, and tacos. But next time I'll ask the guy if there is a way to get less ground. And I'll ask him about the suet. :)

I kept envisioning the I Love Lucy episode where Lucy accidently buys a whole steer and ends up trying to sell it on the "black market" before Ricky finds out.

 That episode was so funny!!! I remember she tried to sell her meat right outside the butcher shop for a discount...LOL I love that show!!
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