I need a recipe for...
#11
I'm going to make mac n cheese tonight. I'll let you know how it turns out. I'll take a picture if it comes out really pretty, or really terrible.
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#12
mom Wrote:Make a roux. Melt butter and whisk in an equal amount of flour. How much depends on how much cheese sauce you want to make. 4tbsp of each is probably sufficient.
Add a good 3-4 cups of milk all at once. Bring to boil. If it is too thick add more milk. If you want it richer, add cream. Shred whatever cheese you have on hand and add to sauce. I use whatever I've got around. American, cheddar, swiss, parmesan etc....
Depending on what your family likes you can add tomatoes, hot sauce, cooked onions etc....
Mix together with the pasta of your choice and bake. You can mix some bread crumbs with butter and sprinkle on top if you like a crust.

Sorry no real recipe but this is one of those dishes that I just shoot from the hip.

This is exactly the way my family makes it!   The mix of different types of cheese always made it taste delish - I particularly liked a good balance of mild cheddar, sharp cheddar, and swiss. 

The only tips I'd add would be to have your casserole ready with the cooked pasta in it, don't stop whisking the sauce until the cheese is thoroughly melted, then pour it right in and mix it.  I don't put the oven higher than 375 because otherwise it dries out, and if you don't want that crunchy brownish crust just cover it with foil.

Happy eating!
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#13
Paloma Wrote:
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:We're midwestern folk, so we've always got a block of imitation-Velveeta in the fridge.  Aldi makes the best imitation-Pasteurized-Processed-Cheese-Spread in these United States.  Just cut it with a little milk and nuke'er, stirring until she's smooth.  Drop it into a pot of whatever noodles are in the cupboard (the long ones like spaghetti/vermacelli/linguini don't work as well as the short fat ones like rotini/penne/farfalle).

Alakazam.

A gourmand such as yourself using imitation velveeta? I don't believe it!

I do have a discerning palate.  I've worked with world traveled chefs, worked at one of the best steakhouses in America, written fine dining menus and wine tasting notes for some ritzy places.  I've got good-food street cred.

But I also appreciate mayonaisse sandwiches and handfuls of imitation-Velveeta cubes.

I'm wild like that.
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#14
Best "mac and cheese" recipe ever! Not a traditional take, but AMAZING none the less!


Saute 1-2 cloves garlic in oil or butter until tender, but not browned.

In another pan, make a roux with butter and a (very) little flour. Add milk or cream to create a thin sauce. Add parmesan, bleu & feta cheeses and stir to melt into the sauce.

Mix together:
1. garlic
2. cooked pasta (rotini, penne, farfalle, or elbow work best)
3. cream sauce
Put the pasta mixture into an oven-safe dish and top liberally with shredded mozzarella cheese. Broil until cheese is golden brown. Garnish with chopped flat leaf parsley, serve and enjoy!


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#15
I love Ina Garten's mac and cheese recipe too. I NEVER use gruyere with it. I use what ever I have in the fridge at the time. If I buy cheese for it then I get a Monterey jack or muenster and a sharp cheddar.
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#16
I made mac and cheese last night with bechamel and cheese. I believe I needed more sauce and more cheese because it came out kind of bland and dry. I didn't think it turned out great but I noticed it was all gone this morning (and I had made a lot) so it must not have been horrible.

I'll make it again in a few days and this time I'll use one of your actual recipes and see if I have better luck. :laughing:
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#17
Paloma Wrote:I made mac and cheese last night with bechamel and cheese. I believe I needed more sauce and more cheese because it came out kind of bland and dry. I didn't think it turned out great but I noticed it was all gone this morning (and I had made a lot) so it must not have been horrible.

I'll make it again in a few days and this time I'll use one of your actual recipes and see if I have better luck. :laughing:

Yes, you've got to use plenty. Maybe a whole (small) saucepanful of bechamel (if you make a whole package of macaroni) and a whole bag of shredded cheese. Don't forget to salt your pasta!
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#18
Macaroni is a kind of moderately extended, machine-made dry pasta. Much shorter than spaghetti and hollow, macaroni does not contain eggs. Though home machines exist that can make macaroni noodles, macaroni is usually commercially made.

I like macaroni.
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#19
When i was a kid I liked maccheroni from De Cecco or Pasta Agnesi. They were about 10" long and had a hole through like a straw. The spaghetti or mafalda, or tagliatelle were about 24' long. Today macaroni is short more like a mostaciollini or a pennini lisce, not rigate. Mmmm, Maccheroni with homemade Bolognese and Sardo cheese, get me to the way back machine. 
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