Can I become Catholic?
#11
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:The people on this messageboard are "Traditional Catholics", which (oversimplification alert!) means that we go to an old form of Catholic Mass said in Latin.  We're also kind of partial to an older way of thinking about Theological matters. :)

I would say "unchanged" rather than "old". The Mass is timeless.
Reply
#12
LaRoza Wrote:
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:The people on this messageboard are "Traditional Catholics", which (oversimplification alert!) means that we go to an old form of Catholic Mass said in Latin.  We're also kind of partial to an older way of thinking about Theological matters. :)

I would say "unchanged" rather than "old". The Mass is timeless.

Save me your semantics.  I said it was an oversimplification.
Reply
#13
I'm curious; what happens if someone like this tries to get an annulment for that first marriage and is denied?  My understanding is that she can't receive Communion until that happens, so if it can't happen, then what?
Reply
#14
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:Save me your semantics.  I said it was an oversimplification.

Well, I just didn't want a new Catholic to get the implicatation it was outdated or anything. I didn't mean any harm and I knew you didn't mean it that way.
Reply
#15
Mhoram Wrote:I'm curious; what happens if someone like this tries to get an annulment for that first marriage and is denied?  My understanding is that she can't receive Communion until that happens, so if it can't happen, then what?
Well, this probably isn't going to be encouraging for our new friend, but since you've asked: if the first marriage is not declared null, then it's still (spiritually) in force.  That, alone, wouldn't be an impediment to becoming Catholic-- people don't convert in pairs!  But it would mean that having, ahem, relations with her current civil-husband would be essentially cheating on her first husband. 

By this logic, she and her second husband would have to live like brother-and-sister (read: sexless and all the stuff that goes with it) to stay in God's grace.  Some would say that she and her second husband would also be be in material scandal to other people, but that's not really my place to conclude.

If the brother-and-sister arrangement would fail to remain like brother-and-sister, then the hypothetical woman (and man, if he is Catholic) would need to go to confession before receiving communion.

Divorce alone doesn't prevent a person from being a good Catholic and receiving communion.  An illicit remarriage (or other uncomely behavior) would be a no-no, of course.

But let's not put the cart before the horse.  These situations come up all the time and there is a proper method for handling it-- outside of Fisheaters!
Reply
#16
lostandwanting, you can call any Catholic Church in your area and tell them you are interested in learning more about the Catholic Faith. Almost every parish has "Inquiry Sessions" which are simply weekly meetings, by group or individually, that give you the opportunity to ask questions about Catholicism. You can determine during Inquiry if and when you feel ready to move on to the next step, which is the RCIA process (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults).

Someone at the parish, probably the pastor or deacon, will walk you through the annulment process (if you need one). He will contact the Tribunal for you - you don't have to do it. Meanwhile, don't let anything hinder your journey home! We have two catechumens in our RCIA who are currently waiting for annulments. As soon as the annulment goes through, they will be baptized. They will not have to wait until the next Easter Vigil.

Take everything in baby steps and let God lead the way. Like Mary who sat at the feet of Jesus, listening to him and asking him questions, you have chosen the better portion and it will not be denied you.

- Lisa
Reply
#17
welcome to the fishtank lostandwondering! welcome


Reply
#18
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote: Save me your semantics.

I keep my semantics in the First National Bank of Semantics.  I get good interest there.
Reply
#19
Anyone can become a Catholic no matter what their past.  God accepts everyone, and so does the Church.

There is no requirement to be a Catholic to say Catholic prayers.  God will especially hear the prayers of someone who wants to convert to His Church, so keep praying all you want, and He will hear you and help you.

And if you get discouraged, don't.  Catholics believe that sometimes God sends us trials and tribulations especially when we are trying to do the right thing.  But we also believe He will send us the graces we need to get through it along with our own hard work and effort.  So whatever obstacles come your way, go through them or around them - don't give up!  Pray hard and work hard and you will succeed with God's help.

If you need help finding a priest or a church, don't be afraid to post and ask.   Your profile says you are in Kentucky, so you are in luck.  Both the FSSP and SSPX have a presence there, and there are several churches that have the Traditional Latin Mass.

Your best bet is to avoid RCIA if possible and instead get help from an FSSP or SSPX priest to learn about the faith.  The next best choice is to talk to a priest at a church where they have the Traditional Latin Mass (Extraordinary Form) as well as the Ordinary Form (i.e., the Mass in English).  That way you will probably get the best formation.

In any event, yes, a thousand times yes, you can become a Catholic.  Find a priest to talk to and get started.  And feel free to post any questions here (of course, asking a priest is the best way to get answers, but we usually do OK here).

What are you waiting for?  The phone isn't going to dial itself! ;)

Oh, and make sure you avail yourself of all the beautiful web pages Vox Clamantis wrote at the main site:  http://www.fisheaters.com  You will learn a lot there. :)

Reply
#20
P.S. about annulments and tribunals and such -- don't worry about it.  Just explain it to the priest and he will know what to do.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)