Recipe for abstinence
Libby: Yeah, I know what you mean about the fibrous salmon cakes. They are so darn mushy. Like eating wet feathers, really. Bleh. (Although I do love salmon.) Actually, this tuna cake recipe started off as a salmon cake recipe with tuna substituted for salmon on one of those "Omigosh, what am I gonna cook for dinner?" nights. It was so good that it took on a life of its own and I have tweaked it over the 10 years I've been making it to the point that it is almost unrecognizable compared to the original.

I LIKE hairy orange juice. Pfft, kids.
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Satori Wrote:I LIKE hairy orange juice. Pfft, kids.

[Image: rockonsmiley.gif]
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Satori Wrote:Libby: Yeah, I know what you mean about the fibrous salmon cakes. They are so darn mushy. Like eating wet feathers, really. Bleh.
wet feathers, not fur.
 
What was I thinking?!
 
[Image: tongue.gif]

 (Although I do love salmon.) Actually, this tuna cake recipe started off as a salmon cake recipe with tuna substituted for salmon on one of those "Omigosh, what am I gonna cook for dinner?" nights. It was so good that it took on a life of its own and I have tweaked it over the 10 years I've been making it to the point that it is almost unrecognizable compared to the original.

It's wonderful - next time i'm trying it with fresh parsley too, because I just have a little dried left over from last year.

I LIKE hairy orange juice. Pfft, kids.



....yeah.
 
hmph.
-although I have to say that it makes me laugh that you talk about hairy orange juice without even skipping a beat....[Image: laff.gif]


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(11-19-2008, 10:54 PM)Satori Wrote: I rustled up my lovely monastic cookbook and am going to share my favorite recipe, "Red Beans in Wine." It is truly luxurious.

Ingredients:
4 cups dry red beans                   1 tablespoon flour
6 tablespoons butter                   1 bottle of red wine
4 onions, sliced                          salt and pepper to taste

Soak the beans overnight. Cook them in salted water for about 1 and a half to 2 hours, until they are tender. Drain.

Melt the butter in a [large, deep] saucepan and lightly brown the onions, then remove with a slotted spoon. Add the flour and stir to make a roux. Add the wine slowly, continuing to stir until the mixture is a smooth sauce.

Add the beans and onions. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring from time to time so beans on bottom do not burn. Serve hot with rice, fish, or eggs. Six servings.

(This makes a fine accompaniment to the eggs baked in milk that I mentioned earlier in this thread.) 

I tried a slightly-modified version of your beans recipe a few weeks ago, only I put the dry ingredients back in the pantry, the butter back in the fridge, and drank the bottle of wine.  Then, I waited for Saturday evening to come around, and made some tomato bread and topped that with some fried eggs for my supper.  It was great! 
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(03-14-2010, 04:41 AM)Texican Wrote:
(11-19-2008, 10:54 PM)Satori Wrote: I rustled up my lovely monastic cookbook and am going to share my favorite recipe, "Red Beans in Wine." It is truly luxurious.

Ingredients:
4 cups dry red beans                   1 tablespoon flour
6 tablespoons butter                   1 bottle of red wine
4 onions, sliced                          salt and pepper to taste

Soak the beans overnight. Cook them in salted water for about 1 and a half to 2 hours, until they are tender. Drain.

Melt the butter in a [large, deep] saucepan and lightly brown the onions, then remove with a slotted spoon. Add the flour and stir to make a roux. Add the wine slowly, continuing to stir until the mixture is a smooth sauce.

Add the beans and onions. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring from time to time so beans on bottom do not burn. Serve hot with rice, fish, or eggs. Six servings.

(This makes a fine accompaniment to the eggs baked in milk that I mentioned earlier in this thread.) 

I tried a slightly-modified version of your beans recipe a few weeks ago, only I put the dry ingredients back in the pantry, the butter back in the fridge, and drank the bottle of wine.  Then, I waited for Saturday evening to come around, and made some tomato bread and topped that with some fried eggs for my supper.  It was great! 

So, uh, you had some raw onions for supper, then? With your bottle of wine?
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(03-14-2010, 09:48 AM)Satori Wrote: So, uh, you had some raw onions for supper, then? With your bottle of wine?

Yeah, but minus the onions.  All i had was chives, and they just weren't gonna cut it.

Actually, I did make the beans later in the week, and they were delicious.
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I hope you didn't become ill from drinking so much wine on an empty stomach. What you really needed was a nice fresh baguette. A piece of baguette dipped in good red wine is delicious.
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Well, I didn't actually drink the whole bottle, but I certainly felt the effects of the alcohol.  A baguette would have been great, although I can't say that I've ever dipped a piece of baguette in wine before. 
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(03-17-2010, 12:48 AM)Texican Wrote: Well, I didn't actually drink the whole bottle, but I certainly felt the effects of the alcohol.  A baguette would have been great, although I can't say that I've ever dipped a piece of baguette in wine before. 

I learned about eating baguette that way from a World War II vet I interviewed.
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(03-17-2010, 08:52 AM)Satori Wrote: I learned about eating baguette that way from a World War II vet I interviewed.

I'll have to give it a try, if I can find a good baguette, locally.
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