Losing weight on Atkins
#51
I just had my blood work done last month, after a few years of a low-carb diet very heavy on animal fat.  (I fry my eggs in a 1/4" of lard every morning and put lots of salt on them.)  My cholesterol numbers are just right.  (That link is to my blog, where I wrote about my results in detail.)  If the mainstream views on saturated fat and cholesterol were at all correct, my cholesterol and triglycerides would be through the roof, and I'd be having heart attacks left and right. 

They're just plain wrong.  It's frustrating to see doctors—people getting paid to know this stuff—so far behind the research.  Not so long ago the same people were pushing trans-fats over saturated fats.  Oops.

A Mediterranean diet seems to mean different things to different people.  If it means olives and cheese and lamb and tomatoes and small amounts of whole grains, that could be pretty good.  If it means lots of  bread made from refined grains, that's bad.  I'm never sure which way people are going with that. 

Good luck with it, though.  If it doesn't work out, I've got that recipe for steak a la pork chops handy. :)

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#52
The mediterranean diet always sounds good.

Nutrisystem is absolutely horrible. HORRIBLE. I did it before my wedding (I ordered my dress a size to small) because my mom had done it back in the late 80's and from what I remember, the food was really good. Then they changed their food to be low GI. UGH.

I am not one of those people that expects diet foods to taste like cheetos and pumpkin pie. I am fully aware that most "diet foods" taste nasty and when I'm dieting, I usually don't care too much. Nutrisystem however exceeded my bottom of the barrel expectations of nastiness. Half of the food was just flat out inedible. They had these muffins for breakfast that were made with soy flour and it was like eating sawdust. They were a choking hazard. When you eat a muffin you expect it to dissolve somewhat in your mouth because flour + moisture = mush. The nutrisystem muffins didn't dissolve or get mushy - they actually took moisture from your mouth and became the texture of sand. What it did with the moisture is still a mystery.

So the next month, I thought, 'well, one more month won't be too bad. I'll just order the things that are okay.' That left: tuna salad, beef and macaroni, and chocolate niblets. No thanks. And the payoff for 2 months of killing myself: 10 little pounds and $500 lighter. That's about all I needed to lose but what a rip-off. I could have exercised an extra 1/2 hour every day for free and had better results.

Anyway, good luck with your diet.

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#53
Quis, you have induced me to post. ;) First of all, good luck on your diet and you know I love ya. With that being said... :P, most doctors don't know sh**t from shinola when it comes to truly healthy foods. They wouldn't know a healthy diet if it bit them in the @ss.

Buy this book and read it: Perfect Weight America. I have 6 success stories for you from this book:
  • Joe, my brother: lost 100 pounds
  • Mary, my sister: lost 45 pounds
  • Ellen, my sister: lost 30 pounds
  • Emily, my sister: lost 25 pounds
  • Maria, my sister: lost 15 pounds
  • ME: have so far lost about 35 pounds and still losing
This book has a balanced, sensible approach to how you eat. What it does is differentiate between good carbs and bad, refined carbs, between whole, healthy foods, and processed crap. It is a low-carb diet based on good, healthy foods. Meats, cheeses, eggs, animal fats, good oils, lots of veggies and fruits, nuts, and so on and so forth.

I've been on it for about 3 months, and I do not feel like I'm on a diet, and the best part is that I get two cheat meals a week --including dessert. lol.

FYI, the author is Jewish, so I have discarded all of his anti-pork hysteria. Try it Quis, I guarantee that you will lose weight in a healthy way. :)

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#54
Of all the low-carb/right carb books/plans etc....out there. I have found
The Sugar Solution from Prevention Magazine to be the most informative, do-able, realistic, most practical suggestions for real people, recipes people will eat and can afford etc...and I have read a lot of these books. They all say the same thing. Lean protein, lots of veggies, whole fruit, drink water and skip the sweets, refined carbs and HFCS. There is something though about this particular book though.
the only gripe I have with it is the suggestion of margarine instead of real butter. That's fine. I can take what I want and leave what I don't.
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#55
Hmm. I do think we need carbs. Here is what Understanding Nutrition (8th ed), by Elanor, Noss, et. al. has to say:

"Every body depends on glucose for is fuel to some extend, and ordinarily, the cells of the brain and the rest of the nervous system depend primarily on glucose for their energy. ..." (p. 104).

I haven't read Atkins at all. What does the brain use, if you have a very low-glucose diet?
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#56
shirhamalot Wrote:Hmm. I do think we need carbs. Here is what Understanding Nutrition (8th ed), by Elanor, Noss, et. al. has to say:

"Every body depends on glucose for is fuel to some extend, and ordinarily, the cells of the brain and the rest of the nervous system depend primarily on glucose for their energy. ..." (p. 104).

I haven't read Atkins at all. What does the brain use, if you have a very low-glucose diet?

The body doesn't need glucose itself to be consumed. It is a very simple sugar (it has the highest glycemic index I think). It is made by the body from other carbs (more complex sugars). It can be made from fat and protein as well, even the fats and proteins of the body.

However, not eating carbs results in the conversion of fat and protein which isn't so great for the body for long term.
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#57
At normal blood sugar levels, your blood contains the equivalent of one teaspoon of sugar.  If you eat no sugar at all (as some Eskimo tribes don't for months in a row, and you probably don't either for several hours while you're sleeping), it's no big deal for your body to produce enough to maintain that level by converting protein and fat.  But in practice, even the strictest low-carb diet I know of, which would be the first two weeks of Atkins, allows the equivalent of four teaspoons of sugar a day.  Low-glucose doesn't mean no-glucose.

For actual energy beyond that, your body is quite happy burning fat and ketones (a by-product of fat-burning) rather than sugar.  People used to think the brain could only use sugar, because they only studied people who were eating a "normal" diet, and they always had enough sugar in the blood that they weren't producing ketones.  Their brains burned sugar because their bodies provided lots of it.  We know now that's not the brain's only option, and there's some evidence that the brain may actually run better on ketones.

Look, I've been low-carbing for a few years now, very strictly for some stretches, and I'm pretty sure my brain hasn't shriveled up and died from lack of sugar yet.  (My kidneys haven't fallen out either: another myth.)  In fact, I feel far more alert and level-headed now that my blood sugar isn't peaking and falling after every meal, messing with my moods.

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#58
My doctor said I had to keep a food/activity diary for two weeks and has now decided that I'm fat because I don't get enough sleep.  I'm torn between believing everything he says and worrying that I've become like my French grandmother, who only went to doctors as long as they told her what she wanted to hear (but she lived to be 86).  
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#59
AdoramusTeChriste Wrote:Quis, try using zucchini in place of pasta when everyone is having spaghetti. Give yourself some extra meatwads. And black olives. Those are a great low-carb snack. [Image: gimmefood.gif]
I can vouch for the zucchini instead of pasta idea.. it works great!  Or even spaghetti squash instead of pasta.  I make a lasagna-like dish that is easy, delicious, and everyone who has tried it can't get enough of it. You just make lasagna like you normally would, but replace the noodle layers with slices of zuchini.  I use the already sliced and grilled zucchini from the grocer's freezer.  And for spaghetti squash, make a nice meaty sauce like you normally would while you are baking half a spaghetti squash.  Pull out the strands and voila.. squash spaghetti!  Sometimes when doing low-carb I just eat meaty spaghetti sauce with steamed veggies, like cauliflower and summer squash, and skip the noodles.  It's easy and tasty!
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#60
miss_fluffy Wrote:
AdoramusTeChriste Wrote:Quis, try using zucchini in place of pasta when everyone is having spaghetti. Give yourself some extra meatwads. And black olives. Those are a great low-carb snack. [Image: gimmefood.gif]
I can vouch for the zucchini instead of pasta idea.. it works great!  Or even spaghetti squash instead of pasta.  I make a lasagna-like dish that is easy, delicious, and everyone who has tried it can't get enough of it. You just make lasagna like you normally would, but replace the noodle layers with slices of zuchini.  I use the already sliced and grilled zucchini from the grocer's freezer.  And for spaghetti squash, make a nice meaty sauce like you normally would while you are baking half a spaghetti squash.  Pull out the strands and voila.. squash spaghetti!  Sometimes when doing low-carb I just eat meaty spaghetti sauce with steamed veggies, like cauliflower and summer squash, and skip the noodles.  It's easy and tasty!

Spaghetti squash and zucchini in place of pasta are really good diet ideas even if you aren't doing low carb.

I've been a weight watcher devotee more or less and points for pasta add up quick.

Another item I really like is Shirataki Noodles.

They are low in carbs (3 grams) and if I remember correctly, they are only 20 calories - making them a 0 point food, per serving.

I might pick some up since I'm back to counting points despite being pregnant. The doctor says he doesn't want me to gain any more weight (in fact, I could even safely lose a few pounds.) Unfortunately, December was tamale, prime rib, and cookie month in our house and I guess I overdid it. Le sigh. :angry:
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