Female, 24, Ohio
#11
Catholicmilkman Wrote:
CatholicChristian Wrote:Pope John Paul II... while I did not agree with everything he did in his life, he was a brilliant mind, and his encyclical letter "Fides et Ratio" was heavily responsible for my reconversion to the Faith.
All you had to do was read the documents of Vatican I, on Faith and reason. What in particular did he say that the Council did not?
Blame the priest I spoke to for recommending "Fides et Ratio" instead of the decrees of Vatican I. I, at the time, had no knowledge of Councils or Papal documents and was simply following the recommendation of the priest whom I questioned about the Catholic faith.
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#12
The_Harlequin_King Wrote:I'm glad no one thought of bringing up neo-paganism or ecumenical councils in my profile thread.
The sub-forum rules Wrote:No one is to use this sub-forum for debate. If you don't like how a person answers any of the Church-related questions below, just shaddup already.
Who's debating? I'm having a conservation with a nice woman who sounds very interesting. Don't you like to get to know a girl before you think about asking her out?
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#13
Quote:Neo-paganism is one of my problems with Lord of Rings which I like. 

Um, C.S.Lewis didn't write the Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien, a devout Catholic, did.

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#14
CatholicChristian Wrote:Blame the priest I spoke to for recommending "Fides et Ratio" instead of the decrees of Vatican I. I, at the time, had no knowledge of Councils or Papal documents and was simply following the recommendation of the priest whom I questioned about the Catholic faith.
I see. I'll read Fides et Ratio, if you read Vatican I's Dogmatic Constitution on the Catholic Faith.
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#15
DeiMateralma Wrote:
Quote:Neo-paganism is one of my problems with Lord of Rings which I like. 
Um, C.S. Lewis didn't write the Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien, a devout Catholic, did.
huh? I never said that C.S. Lewis wrote Lord of the Rings. J.R.R. Tolkien's works, not just Lord of the Rings, were influenced by neo-paganism as well though, which is the reason why Hilaire Belloc did not like them. Historians are way better story writers in my book anyway. Belloc's books are excellent. Tolkien was a brilliant linguist though.
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#16
Catholicmilkman Wrote:Who's debating? I'm having a conservation with a nice woman who sounds very interesting.

It's possible to do both at the same time. A debate: "a discussion, as of a public question in an assembly, involving opposing viewpoints".

Quote:Don't you like to get to know a girl before you think about asking her out?

I decided to take Catholic777's advice and just take girls by conquest from now on.



(no, I did not really decide that)
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#17
Catholicmilkman Wrote:
DeiMateralma Wrote:
Quote:Neo-paganism is one of my problems with Lord of Rings which I like. 
Um, C.S. Lewis didn't write the Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien, a devout Catholic, did.
huh? I never said that C.S. Lewis wrote Lord of the Rings. J.R.R. Tolkien's works, not just Lord of the Rings, were influenced by neo-paganism as well though, which is the reason why Hilaire Belloc did not like them. Historians are way better story writers in my book anyway. Belloc's books are excellent. Tolkien was a brilliant linguist though.

Ah, my mistake.  I'm sorry, I was a bit tired when I posted that.
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#18
Catholicmilkman Wrote:
CatholicChristian Wrote:Blame the priest I spoke to for recommending "Fides et Ratio" instead of the decrees of Vatican I. I, at the time, had no knowledge of Councils or Papal documents and was simply following the recommendation of the priest whom I questioned about the Catholic faith.
I see. I'll read Fides et Ratio, if you read Vatican I's Dogmatic Constitution on the Catholic Faith.
Sure, I'd read it again.

 (FYI, my reconversion was years ago-- about 7 years, now that I think about it... but I've been strictly traditional (i.e., TLM) for 2+ years, though if you ask the priests and persons that helped with my conversion they'd tell you I've been traditional all along)
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#19
CatholicChristian Wrote:Top 5 Favorite books of all time: "Till We Have Faces" by CS Lewis, "Love & Responsibility" by Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), "Proslogion" by St. Anselm, "The Heresy of Formlessness" by Martin Mosebach, and the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy by JRR Tolkien

You liked the Proslogion? It made me want to blow my brains out. But then again, I'm not into that kind of philosophy.

Kudos for Till We Have Faces though.
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#20
neel Wrote:
CatholicChristian Wrote:Top 5 Favorite books of all time: "Till We Have Faces" by CS Lewis, "Love & Responsibility" by Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II), "Proslogion" by St. Anselm, "The Heresy of Formlessness" by Martin Mosebach, and the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy by JRR Tolkien

You liked the Proslogion? It made me want to blow my brains out. But then again, I'm not into that kind of philosophy.

Kudos for Till We Have Faces though.
I love the "Proslogion"! I nearly have the entire first chapter memorized-- it's a beautiful prayer! I think you should give it another chance... my favorite translation is the one by Thomas Williams; it's very poetic.
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