Chrismation
#1
I landed on the "Eastern Orthodoxy" article on Wikipedia, and came upon this tidbit:

Quote:Converts to Orthodoxy (even converts from other Christian denominations)[citation needed] are usually formally baptized into the Orthodox Church though exceptions are sometimes made. Those who have left Orthodoxy and adopted a new religion, if they return to their Orthodox roots are usually received back into the church through the mystery of Chrismation.

.... Chrismation (sometimes called confirmation) is the mystery by which a baptized person is granted the gift of the Holy Spirit through anointing with Holy Chrism.[37] It is normally given immediately after baptism as part of the same service, but is also used to receive lapsed members of the Orthodox Church.[38] As baptism is a person's participation in the death and resurrection of Christ, so Chrismation is a person's participation in the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost.[39]

Wouldn't this be blasphemy against the Holy Ghost? Eastern Catholics don't do this, do they?
Reply
#2
No, Eastern Catholics do not do this.  However, the Orthodox are basically just expressing the same thing that Latin Catholics believe when a baptised Catholic commits a mortal sin; they have basically kicked the Holy Spirit out of them.  In the East, we emphasize chrismation as being the indwelling of the Holy Spirit.  So, in the West, to have the Holy Spirit return to you, you go to confession.  In Eastern Orthodoxy, you get rechrismated.  If I'm not mistaken, this practice goes back to before the schism between East and West, so I don't see that it can be called blasphemous.  Also, this practice, even among the Orthodox, isn't widely practiced today.  Most apostate Orthodox are received back through confession alone.
Reply
#3
Confirmation/Crismation can only be validly ministered once.
Reply
#4
Melkite Wrote:No, Eastern Catholics do not do this. However, the Orthodox are basically just expressing the same thing that Latin Catholics believe when a baptised Catholic commits a mortal sin; they have basically kicked the Holy Spirit out of them. In the East, we emphasize chrismation as being the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. So, in the West, to have the Holy Spirit return to you, you go to confession. In Eastern Orthodoxy, you get rechrismated. If I'm not mistaken, this practice goes back to before the schism between East and West, so I don't see that it can be called blasphemous. Also, this practice, even among the Orthodox, isn't widely practiced today. Most apostate Orthodox are received back through confession alone.

Thanks!
Reply
#5
I see nothing wrong with having one Sacrament of Chrismation/Confirmation and then other annointings that, while a mere sacramental (a distinction less emphasized in the East), mirrors or closely resembles confirmation and signifies its re-vivification when a lapsed converts return.

Remember, even in the West when confirmation is delayed until after the age of reason, we have another anointing with chrism, at baptism, that resembles it and essentially "holds its place".

One is the Sacrament proper and one is just a sacramental re-calling (or, in our case, pre-calling) it. As sacramentals are supposed to do, their definition is, afterall: sacred signs which bear a resemblance to the Sacraments proper and confer actual graces.

In Eastern theology the distinction between the Sacraments and "mere" sacramentals is not emphasized, as all the actions of the Church tend to be seen as an organic whole. It's just a different angle of viewing it, complimentary to ours, not wrong.

In Western theological terms, then, chrismation is only a Sacrament the first time, and a mere sacramental the other times. But I see no reason to substantially alter the later ceremonies or anything to explicitly state this if the practice is traditional.

The re-ordinations and re-baptisms even for Catholics, on the other hand, can be somewhat offensive...but in some sense they are just like conditional ordinations and baptisms (which used to be common for Protestant converts to Catholicism). The conditional formula itself ("if you are not already...") is not really known in the East, but the intent in doing it is essentially the same, and also as a way to "supply the ceremonies" as it were.

This should all be clarified between Orthodox and Catholic, but it in no way presents an insurmountable hurdle.
Reply
#6
I was going to mention that and say maybe these anoitings are just treated as 'sacramentals' not 'sacraments.' Excellent points you have.
Reply
#7
Well, they're not actually treated or even thought of any differently in the East, because as I said that distinction between Sacraments and sacramentals is not emphasized in the East, and some even claim it is an artificial Western theological construct.

I think both the Eastern view that emphasizes the organic wholeness and similarity of all the Church's actions, and the Western view that distinguishes specifically those Seven actions instituted by Christ Himself which confer an increase in sanctifying grace, and those ritual actions extrapolated from them later and instituted by the Church which confer only actual graces...can be complimentary.

But under the Eastern view...they would generally think of the two chrismations as essentially the same or rather be ambivalent about any theoretical difference if it had no practical consequence. Whereas we would make the abstract Sacrament/sacramental distinction.

But those are just two different ways of viewing it, complimentary. One more pragmatic, one more theoretical, but neither wrong.
Reply
#8
MeaMaximaCulpa Wrote:I landed on the "Eastern Orthodoxy" article on Wikipedia, and came upon this tidbit:

Converts to Orthodoxy (even converts from other Christian denominations)[citation needed] are usually formally baptized into the Orthodox Church though exceptions are sometimes made. Those who have left Orthodoxy and adopted a new religion, if they return to their Orthodox roots are usually received back into the church through the mystery of Chrismation.

Wouldn't this be blasphemy against the Holy Ghost? Eastern Catholics don't do this, do they?

Interestingly, just the other day while doing an internet search about something, I ran across this article unrelated to the search, which I still found interesting and bookmarked, from The Orthodox Church in America (OCA) .  Their practice is to receive Roman Catholics and protestants through Chrismation , but they are not rebaptized.  Eastern Catholics are not re Chrismated.  Also, a Catholic priest going to Orthodoxy is not re ordained.

Bishop Tikhon's letter does not discuss the reconciliation of a lapsed Orthodox coming back to the Church, but the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese states:
As was stated earlier, Holy Chrism is used mainly in the celebration of the sacrament of Chrismation, which takes place immediately following the sacrament of Baptism. It is, however, a separate, distinct sacrament from Baptism.
 
The Holy Chrism is also used to chrismate the heterodox (non‑Orthodox) joining the Church, and to chrismate those fallen away from the Orthodox Faith and who are returning to the Orthodox Church.
(next to last and immediatley preceeding paragraphs of the cited article).
Reply
#9
Melkite Wrote:No, Eastern Catholics do not do this.  However, the Orthodox are basically just expressing the same thing that Latin Catholics believe when a baptised Catholic commits a mortal sin; they have basically kicked the Holy Spirit out of them.  In the East, we emphasize chrismation as being the indwelling of the Holy Spirit.  So, in the West, to have the Holy Spirit return to you, you go to confession.  In Eastern Orthodoxy, you get rechrismated.  If I'm not mistaken, this practice goes back to before the schism between East and West, so I don't see that it can be called blasphemous.  Also, this practice, even among the Orthodox, isn't widely practiced today.  Most apostate Orthodox are received back through confession alone.
So every time an Eastern Orthodox commits a serious sin, he is re-chrismated?  What's the point of them having Confession?  And, by the way, just because it was practiced before the "Great Schism" doesn't mean it is legitimate.  The East had many erroneous practices even before the schism and was always a hotbed of heterodoxy and rebellion--this is one of the factors leading of to the schism in the first place.
Reply
#10
Chrismation or confirmation does not remit any mortal sins, merely (in theory, if piously received) venial sins.

Only the sacrament of penance (Confession) forgives mortal sins, if administered by a validly ordained priest with jurisdiction.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)