Ideas wanted for Historical Clothing Business
#21
Regarding saint costumes:
 
Southern Cross - The time periods for each saint listed are:

St. Therese - 1873-1897 - Are you thinking of her as she is portrayed as an adult saint? There are in fact pictures of her as a child. St. Therese would be one of the easiest to copy for outfits, because of how recent she is.

St. Lucia (Lucy) - 283-304 AD - Her outfit could be copied from holy cards, or I could make something in the style of the time. Young virgins wore different clothing than married women, so there is fairly good documentation.

Our Lady Of Fatima - The Blessed Mother could be portrayed as she is in illustrations and statues.

The_Harlequin_King - Ah, you would pick men with extravagent clothing. [Image: laff.gif]

St. Thomas More- 1478-1535 - His clothing would be Tudor in style, as he was in King Henry VIII court. There are a few paintings of him, so several different types of outfits could be created.

St. Thomas Becket- 1118-1170- His clothing would of course be that of a medieval bishop. However, full regalia as per some paintings of him, might also have to include a plastic sword to wear on your head, in the arrow through the head style. He was murdered after all...[Image: duel.gif]




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#22
TantumErgo -

St. Catherine of Alexandria- 282-305 AD - There are many portrayals of this remarkable saint. She could either be portrayed in higher class clothing, as she is said to have the the daughter of the Governor of Alexandria, or more plain clothing (as she was a very humble person). Interestingly, I recently went to a reenactment where there was a costume contest, and a lady dressed as St. Catherine. She wore a plain pink gown (think biblical robes),a wreath of pink roses on her head, and carried a spoked wheel (one of St. Catherine's symbols). Something like that would be simple to make!

St. Cecilia - died 117 AD- Her clothing would be fairly simple, and roman in style. I've seen her portrayed as dressed in white with a harp, and with roses.
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On another note, I love gowns from the 18th century too! They would not be too hard to make, but remember to achieve that look, women were wearing corsets! I love Mob caps or "Day Caps" as they are called. Women were always covered, headwear wise. You would put your hood or hat over your day cap, except if you were going to a ball of course.



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#23
LydiaW Wrote:The_Harlequin_King - Ah, you would pick men with extravagent clothing. [Image: laff.gif]

St. Thomas More- 1478-1535 - His clothing would be Tudor in style, as he was in King Henry VIII court. There are a few paintings of him, so several different types of outfits could be created.

St. Thomas Becket- 1118-1170- His clothing would of course be that of a medieval bishop. However, full regalia as per some paintings of him, might also have to include a plastic sword to wear on your head, in the arrow through the head style. He was murdered after all...[Image: duel.gif]

I think it'd be awesome to have a burgundy velvet jacket like the one in Holbein's portrait of More. Or, something in black like Jeremy Northam's costume for More in the show The Tudors. The Lord Chancellor's chain of office would be a necessity.

[Image: 0000038764_20070327162242.jpg]



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#24
Actually, I was thinking of her nun habit for St. Therese, but come to think of it, that would be a really neat costume too of her as a child.

First thing actually, I should get nuns costumes. I can just imagine how thrilled my little girls would be to run around the house dresses as sisters!
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#25
LydiaW Wrote:On another note, I love gowns from the 18th century too! They would not be too hard to make, but remember to achieve that look, women were wearing corsets! I love Mob caps or "Day Caps" as they are called. Women were always covered, headwear wise. You would put your hood or hat over your day cap, except if you were going to a ball of course.

I hope you are speaking of the peasantry class of costume dress and not of the aristocracy... the aristocracy period dress is very complex and complicated. I would not recommend going for historical accuracy unless you are truly an advanced sewer.The reason I say this is because there are several layers to the dress and underthings; not to mention the corset. The corset alone would require not only stiching in boning but also a type of vertical overstitching to reinforce the boning and under corset in addition to carving out a wooden busk to insert into the front. Then there are the split crotch/bum pantalets, the under corset chemise, the over corset cover the layers of underskirts topped with ribbon wrapped wire cages jointed with leather straps and then buckled often into tabs on the corset. Next thereis the decorative corset cover and skirt. Then there is the bodice. It gets laced up the back and thewn sewn to the decorative corset cover and then either the flair piece is sewn on the back or another back cover is sewn on. Then the overskirt is sewn onto the base of the bodice. There are also fun things like stockings to contend with and other accessories. The required material alone for the main body is about 27 yards. The contrast pieces are usually about 6-10 yards. The muslin under things account for 30 yards. And the corset would require 8 yards of various materrials layered.

But in the end, you get to look like this:



I apologize that I can't embed it but it is worth seeing the first the first few minutes at least to see the ordeal of getting dressed in this period.
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#26
Oooh, Melita, I love that film, too. The Goblin King ... sigh ...

Always wanted to have a ball like that, and make all those masks myself.
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#27
gretel Wrote:
LydiaW Wrote:On another note, I love gowns from the 18th century too! They would not be too hard to make, but remember to achieve that look, women were wearing corsets! I love Mob caps or "Day Caps" as they are called. Women were always covered, headwear wise. You would put your hood or hat over your day cap, except if you were going to a ball of course.

I hope you are speaking of the peasantry class of costume dress and not of the aristocracy... the aristocracy period dress is very complex and complicated. I would not recommend going for historical accuracy unless you are truly an advanced sewer.The reason I say this is because there are several layers to the dress and underthings; not to mention the corset. The corset alone would require not only stiching in boning but also a type of vertical overstitching to reinforce the boning and under corset in addition to carving out a wooden busk to insert into the front. Then there are the split crotch/bum pantalets, the under corset chemise, the over corset cover the layers of underskirts topped with ribbon wrapped wire cages jointed with leather straps and then buckled often into tabs on the corset. Next thereis the decorative corset cover and skirt. Then there is the bodice. It gets laced up the back and thewn sewn to the decorative corset cover and then either the flair piece is sewn on the back or another back cover is sewn on. Then the overskirt is sewn onto the base of the bodice. There are also fun things like stockings to contend with and other accessories. The required material alone for the main body is about 27 yards. The contrast pieces are usually about 6-10 yards. The muslin under things account for 30 yards. And the corset would require 8 yards of various materrials layered.

But in the end, you get to look like this:



I apologize that I can't embed it but it is worth seeing the first the first few minutes at least to see the ordeal of getting dressed in this period.

I loathe most of the clothing in "Dangerous Liaisons." And the wigs, the makeup, the egg baskets the women wear on their hips ... Shoot, I'd rather have been a peasant, I think.

Gretel, from the pictures I've seen, it seems that American women's clothing of the same period was much simpler, even for the upper classes. Is that correct?
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#28
Tha's why I don't like historical accuracy when it comes to fashion. I like achieving the look of period, without being period.
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#29
here some other beatiful photos:
http://www.traditioninaction.org/Cultura...Laredo.htm
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#30
Satori Wrote:Oooh, Melita, I love that film, too. The Goblin King ... sigh ...

Always wanted to have a ball like that, and make all those masks myself.

Me too! I can quote lots of it verbatim. Brian Froud designed most of the masks and costume pieces in that scene (and much of the film in general). He's an excellent artist!


[Image: labyrinth-ball.jpg]
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