Vatican does 180 on Holocaust denier
#11
Corvino Wrote:
ggreg Wrote:God likes blood sacrifice.
Right. He likes it so much, He instituted a bloodless sacrifice as the representation of heaven on Earth.
The Unblood Manner of the Sacrifice is only possible because of It's Bloody Manner according to God's Will. God Wills sacrifice for without sacrifice there can be no love. God gives us His Own Life, that's the Sacrifice of His Love, Himself, because He is Love.
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#12
kjvail Wrote:You know I am not inclined to entertain "the jews are responsible" type theories, but cases like this make one wonder...
One must be careful not fall over the edge and blame them for everything but neither should one take refuge in willful blindness. The best key to this mystery is the story of Gospel itself.
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#13
Benno Wrote:Division and intrigue in the Vatican? Damn these modern times! [Image: smile.gif]
Feeling like a Renaissance man? Let's pray for saints like God sent His Church back then.

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#14
Corvino Wrote:
ggreg Wrote:God likes blood sacrifice.

Right. He likes it so much, He instituted a bloodless sacrifice as the representation of heaven on Earth.

Right, find me a prophet who predicts the new springtime will work or the Church gets out of this mess without a lot of pain and suffering.
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#15
Bonifacio Wrote:In my opinion, there are three ways to look at the present situation and to assess the actions of the Supreme Pontiff:

1. The Pope has recanted his modernism and is slowly but genuinely attempting to restore the Church against the corporate resistance of disobedient cardinals and wayward bishops.

2. The Pope is merely more conservative than his predecessor but is still genuinely trying to figure out a solution to the traditionalists within a Vatican II model of "reconciled diversity".

3. The Pope is a rabid modernist, extremely cunning and is trying to sabotage the SSPX and the whole catholic resistance by absorbing them into the ecumenic fold.

I'm inclined to the second view, although I can't honestly disregard the other two.
I think the assumption that he's a modernist, or ever really was, is questionable to begin with. I think he's trying to do what he thinks is best for the Church, possibly under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost.

Lets just pray and shut up for once about the Pope's past and present theological tendencies. We're all idiosyncratic.
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#16
I second Fridayer's thoughts.
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#17
fridayer Wrote:
Bonifacio Wrote:In my opinion, there are three ways to look at the present situation and to assess the actions of the Supreme Pontiff:

1. The Pope has recanted his modernism and is slowly but genuinely attempting to restore the Church against the corporate resistance of disobedient cardinals and wayward bishops.

2. The Pope is merely more conservative than his predecessor but is still genuinely trying to figure out a solution to the traditionalists within a Vatican II model of "reconciled diversity".

3. The Pope is a rabid modernist, extremely cunning and is trying to sabotage the SSPX and the whole catholic resistance by absorbing them into the ecumenic fold.

I'm inclined to the second view, although I can't honestly disregard the other two.
I think the assumption that he's a modernist, or ever really was, is questionable to begin with. I think he's trying to do what he thinks is best for the Church, possibly under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost.

Lets just pray and shut up for once about the Pope's past and present theological tendencies. We're all idiosyncratic.

Yeah, WE ARE ALL IDIOSYNCRATIC TOO!

[Image: PopeApostasy.jpg]



What about this Protestant receiving communion in the hand?  He looks a little idiosyncratic too.

[Image: 118_RatzingerSchutz04.jpg]


This chap looks a little idiosyncratic too.

[Image: alien_christ.jpg]


Two friends discussing their idiosyncratic ideas about how the Church should open itself up to the world.

[Image: joseph.ratzinger.vaticanii.jpg]

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#18
Bonifacio Wrote:In my opinion, there are three ways to look at the present situation and to assess the actions of the Supreme Pontiff:

1. The Pope has recanted his modernism and is slowly but genuinely attempting to restore the Church against the corporate resistance of disobedient cardinals and wayward bishops.

2. The Pope is merely more conservative than his predecessor but is still genuinely trying to figure out a solution to the traditionalists within a Vatican II model of "reconciled diversity".

3. The Pope is a rabid modernist, extremely cunning and is trying to sabotage the SSPX and the whole catholic resistance by absorbing them into the ecumenic fold.

I'm inclined to the second view, although I can't honestly disregard the other two.
These possibilities are not relevant if the Pope can only act under duress.
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#19
columba Wrote:
Bonifacio Wrote:In my opinion, there are three ways to look at the present situation and to assess the actions of the Supreme Pontiff:

1. The Pope has recanted his modernism and is slowly but genuinely attempting to restore the Church against the corporate resistance of disobedient cardinals and wayward bishops.

2. The Pope is merely more conservative than his predecessor but is still genuinely trying to figure out a solution to the traditionalists within a Vatican II model of "reconciled diversity".

3. The Pope is a rabid modernist, extremely cunning and is trying to sabotage the SSPX and the whole catholic resistance by absorbing them into the ecumenic fold.

I'm inclined to the second view, although I can't honestly disregard the other two.
These possibilities are not relevant if the Pope can only act under duress.

We really don't know that. His Holiness certainly has a lot of raging wolves around him but as far as we can tell, we don't know if the Pope is under duress. I believe that if it were for the wolves themselves, no motu propri
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#20
Quote:
I think the assumption that he's a modernist, or ever really was, is questionable to begin with.

It's not questionable at all. Clearly you are completly unaquainted with his writings, teaching and other works before, especially DURING, and after Vatican II, before he took The Chair.

First education, THEN assumption.
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