Sandwich Bread
#11
Remnant's recipe is pretty much the one I use, but to get the crispy crust, here's a tip: put the bread in a baking container with a lid, and cover it for 1/2 the time it's in the oven. That way, the moisture from the bread baking doesn't escape, and works sort of like those steam injector ovens bakeries have. For the rising part, [Image: shrug.gif]. For some reason when I started baking, none of the sandwich bread would rise enough, and then suddenly it fixed itself. Never figured out why.
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#12
frerejacques Wrote:
Satori Wrote:My prejudice against bread machines has nothing to do with whether or not they are capable of raising a yeasty loaf. No amount of proofing proselytization on their behalf is going to convince me to use one even if I ever do have a kitchen with space enough to store one of the evil contraptions. Y'all are welcome to 'em, though.

If it's any consolation I don't like them either. I had one, but got rid of it.  For me the whole point of making bread isn't getting the bread, but the process.  I love the feel of the dough and the way the smell changes as the dough develops.
Yes! That, and also the crust isn't nice when made in a bread machine. 
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#13
I cannot knead dough due to physical limitations. Well I guess I could but if I did it would greatly reduce the amount of homemade bread I made.

I either make a ciabatta style bread that is a very wet dough of water, salt, flour, yeast (no proofing, no sugar) that mixes in my stand mixer for 5 minutes or so and then I let rise, form, rise and bake or I let my bread machine do the mixing and kneading for other bread doughs. I always bake in my oven though.

there is a pretty good sandwich bread recipe on the back of the King Arthur flour bag.


I buy yeast by the pound and go through a pound every 6-8 weeks. I keep it in my fridge and can't remember the last time I had 'bad yeast'. probably when I was still using the stuff in envelopes or jars.
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#14
and I use a spray bottle to add moisture to my oven. i open the door, spray a few squirts of water on the sides every 10 or 15 minutes. does make a better crust.
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#15
Okay, next questions:

Where can you buy yeast by the pound? I hope I don't have to go someplace like Sam's Club.

What are these digital thermometers I'm hearing about? Is it just a regular thermometer or some special one for the kitchen?
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#16
Satori Wrote:Okay, next questions:

Where can you buy yeast by the pound? I hope I don't have to go someplace like Sam's Club.

You can get it from a restaurant or bakery supply store in very large quantities.  You can also buy it online:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/landing.jsp?go=DetailDefault&id=1460

I also recommend King Arthur whole wheat flour.  I just made a loaf this week (bread machine, I'm lazy) I haven't tried their other ones.  You'll need vital gluten if you go solely with whole wheat flour.

Quote:What are these digital thermometers I'm hearing about? Is it just a regular thermometer or some special one for the kitchen?


A digital kitchen thermometer can be had at the grocery store.  You can probably use a $15 digital meat thermometer just fine.  You don't need a $90+ thermometer which is what a chef's thermometer would cost.

If you get fancy, you'll want a kitchen scale to measure by weight instead of volume.  Again, no reason to get a hugely expensive one.
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#17
Satori Wrote:Okay, next questions:

Where can you buy yeast by the pound? I hope I don't have to go someplace like Sam's Club.

What are these digital thermometers I'm hearing about? Is it just a regular thermometer or some special one for the kitchen?

Yes, I get mine at BJ's.  But with most of these clubs, if you don't belong, they let you in and you pay an extra 15% or something like that.  If you do a lot of baking, it's still worth it.

 

Christina

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#18
Oven snobs can overlook this question: I am a reasonably decent baker, but i don't have enough interest to be an everyday baker.  Frankly, Wonder Bread is just too cheap for me to worry about kneading anything.  But I'm down with homemade bread and wouldn't object to buying a bread machine.

Any suggestions for bread machines?  Experience?  Input?
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#19
This one is good.
 
That's a newer model of the one I have.  I researched the heck out of them before I bought one a few years ago.  Works flawlessly and makes a decent-sized loaf (2 lb).

 
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#20
I buy my yeast by the lb at my local grocery store. It is Fleischman's. Comes in a plain white vacuum sealed bag.
I am a flour snob. I use good flour (King Arthur) or other high quality flour and do buy high protein for bread and low protein for cookies and cakes.
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