Sandwich Bread
#41
Again,  :eats:
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#42
Most every day is bread day here. Another day, another loaf, another splash of wine. God is good to us.  :pray2:
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#43
I love baking bread. I noticed that the taste of my bread drastically improved after using the methods described in the Tassajara Bread Book. You have to let the bread rise a LOT more times than I was previously used to, but the results are worth it. Perfect sandwich bread.
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#44
(08-09-2010, 12:21 AM)alicewyf Wrote: I love baking bread. I noticed that the taste of my bread drastically improved after using the methods described in the Tassajara Bread Book. You have to let the bread rise a LOT more times than I was previously used to, but the results are worth it. Perfect sandwich bread.
Really... How many times do you let it rise?

I let my sandwich bread dough rise around 3 or 4 times.


On a side note, I find that pizza dough comes out much thinner if I refrigerate it for like an hour beforehand. I like it that way. Thin.  :)
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#45
Interesting. I only rise my bread twice. What does the extra rising do to it? I should think it would be all holey.
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#46
The only reason I give mine the extra rise is because I'm waiting for the dough cycle on the bread machine to finish, then I take it out, knead it once more and place it in the oven to rise prior to baking. I don't like using the bread machine to cook the dough, because it leaves a big pock mark from the paddle in the center of the loaf.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#47
This recipe is the first one I used that asked you to let the bread dough rise 4 times. Previously I had recipes that only asked you to do it twice. I find the extra risings (?) makes the bread lighter and fluffier as opposed to dense/ more cakelike.
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