The Errors of Opus Dei
#21
Superduper's posts and screen name is typical of the 'let 1000 flowers bloom' or 'slap a happy face sticker on it' attitude of those with in the Opus. Superdooper, no operation lemonade here please. Thanks

This smugness is boring and quite silly and frankly the sooner OD is finished with the better but that wont happen for awhile due to the 80,000 plus members and the HUGE amounts of money they have.

They are a well oiled recruiting machine aiming for 'high flyers' and the innocent with Numerarys having to recruit up to 7 new opies a year. (they call this fishing) most recruits come through the OD affiliated schools where Numerarys work as teachers and/or tutors making the 'fishing' process quite easy. This totally wrong and most of the time parents are unaware that their child is being targeted by a Numerary. The recruitment starts as early as 14 with movies at the study centers (where Numeraries live) or service projects, excursions ect ect. All looks quite innocent until little Johnny or Jane doesn't come home for Christmas or birthdays as they celebrate it with their 'new family' and thats when it's too late.
The universal call to holiness is quite an edifying (and Catholic anyway) thing to strive for but not by these means

It's quite unfair as most of the Super Numaries or Co-operators of OD are good people just looking for a way out of the current quagmire that the Church has found itself in in the last 40 or so years. They see the Paul VI mass said with reverence, smells and bells ect, and when one hasn't had anything in the last 40 or so years who would blame them for jumping at the chance and defended it when it's practices are bought in to question. But the married or Co-operative members have no idea what goes on behind the closed doors of Study Centers which is typical of the 'need to know basis' with in The Work.

Opus Dei has benefited hugely from the the crisis, whilst they aren't enjoying the same sort of freedom they had during JP II's days, they are still there working away.

Pray for them so as the scales will be lifted from their eyes.

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#22
I spent some time with Opus Dei.

1. Regarding their spirituality, it's the best that a Novus Ordo Catholic is likely to stumble across if they are not familiar with Traditionalism. I refer to "The Way" as "the flotsam and jetsam of the traditional Catholic Church." The barque of Peter was torpedoed at Vatican II, and the bits and pieces of traditional spirituality floating about are collected in "The Way." That was the only book by Msgr. Escriva in print at the time of his death.

2. Regarding their recruitment: they don't want to attract just anybody. Anyone with experience of OD has no doubt that they are very elitist. This is not necessarily evil. But it is an indisputable fact. They hang around Ivy League schools looking to pick up converts. You won't find any member of OD recruiting at a community college in fly-over country.

3. OD does a lot of good by getting people to practice a spiritual life. They encourage spiritual reading, mortification and frequent reception of the sacraments. They do harm by mixing a great deal of worldliness into their spiritual program. If you REALLY want to do "the work of God," then you must become successful in your field, and your "field" better not be truck driver. There's no place for losers. Money is a mark of success, and therefore an indicator that you can promote "the work of God" by your leadership in your lucrative profession. 
4. The struggle to live an "Opus Dei lifestyle" creates a lot of tension. When you are in OD, "keeping up with the Joneses" is a fight for survival. I believe it was this stress that drove Robert Hanssen to commit his acts of espionage. He was trying to live an "Opus Dei lifestyle" on the income of an FBI agent, which isn't possible.

Most of the OD people I met were rich and worldly in a way that shocked me. Not because I was more spiritual than them, I was less spiritual, but because I was simple and unsophisticated and hadn't met real people who lived this way.

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#23
Replying to Orville and Maximillian, I joined Opus Dei as a numerary, so I think I would know if there were a "two tier system".

Smug? Probably. Pride is a dreadful sin that very few people ever live without. Sinner? Definitely.

Elitist? I suppose it depends who you know and who you have met. Certainly some people are rich, but growing up in England, most of the supernumeraries here (like me) are living life relying on God's Providence, as is everyone else, as each Centre has a huge, crippling mortgage.

I would give thanks to God if He had used me as an instrument to bring 7 people closer to Him in a year. I want to bring my friends closer to God. Some may be called to Opus Dei, some to other things? Who really cares? All that matters is that they grow closer to God and His love?

Thank you Orville for asking people to pray for us. Please pray for us. Pray for us to fulfil our role in God's Church as He wants, that we may see His light, grow closer to Him and try to be the saints that all Christians are called to be.



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#24
Oh!

And I didn't get the whole lemonade thing. Maybe you mean sweet on the outside and bitter on the inside?

Aren't we all sinners and bitter on the inside? How I long to love God more!!!

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#25
Dear Orville and Maximillian,


In Orville's post he states that many of the recruiters for OD are Teachers or Tutors.  Maximillian states that "Profession or Career" is important, and that had better not be that of a Truck Driver.  Coming from a family of Teachers, I can assure you that most Truck Drivers make more money than most Teachers--especially in Private High, Middle and Elementary Schools.  Now I could be absolutely wrong.  Also, the amount of money one makes may not be the actual issue Maximillian is raising, but rather the one of Professional Status (and if this is so, why would the Truck Driver's chosen field be one of "losers?").

I have very little experience with Opus Dei, I have attended a couple of their "Evenings of Reflection" in Miami when I lived down there.  I felt a little out of place because out of about 35 men there each time, I was the only non-hispanic, and most spoke to each other in Spanish, although the Reflection was all in English.  Noone except for one of the residents of the house seemed to want to speak to me.  When I moved from Miami, I did not seek out another house.

However, I love St. Josemaria's writings, especially those found in "The Way," and I refer often to it when I am "down in the dumps."  I find much inspiration in his writings, and many times they help me to refocus my attention away from the world and back to God.

Just my two cents and my first-hand experience.
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#26
maurin Wrote:Also, the amount of money one makes may not be the actual issue Maximillian is raising, but rather the one of Professional Status (and if this is so, why would the Truck Driver's chosen field be one of "losers?").
It's a combination of both money and prestige. Truck driving was the example I chose because it is not a high prestige field. Ivy-League graduates do not become truck drivers. Although it's not relevant to the point we're discussing, but I believe you overestimate the amount of money made by truck drivers.

I know a member of Opus Dei who has been very dedicated to them for many years, but who cannot afford to send his own children to their school, despite the fact that he is a college professor.

maurin Wrote:However, I love St. Josemaria's writings, especially those found in "The Way," and I refer often to it when I am "down in the dumps."  I find much inspiration in his writings, and many times they help me to refocus my attention away from the world and back to God.

I had the same experience. For many years "The Way" was my primary or even only spiritual reading. Many of the 999 sayings are memorized in my mind, not through effort but simply by repetition. At the time, when I was a Novus Ordo Catholic surrounded by touchy-feely Catholicism, coming across Opus Dei and "The Way" was virtually my only contact with the true Catholic faith. For that reason I am very grateful to them.
Sometimes my gratitude for the good they did me is overshadowed by my cynicism regarding the worldliness that drove me away. For that I apologize.

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#27
Their recruitment techniques are really just creepy to me.
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#28
Opus Dei is just creepy, period.
super Wrote:I joined Opus Dei as a numerary, so I think I would know if there were a "two tier system".
You would think so wouldn't you. So blind. Being a super num num now you'd be aware of the 'two tier system'. So how did they get you? Uni? School? Truck driver? Parents? Over zelousness at the tender age of 16?

Why didn't you leave OD and get some real responsibilities like a real family (as opposed as the fake one you had in your nice study center) or become a religious instead of turning up to your home with your meals prepared and clothes washed by underpaid female associate numeraries all the while ripping children from their parents care at such vulnerable stages of their lives so as to keep the stupid promises you make every March 19th. Your oganisation is an affront to the 4th Commandment and the true Catholic faith.  You stick with OD because they do the work for you as does anyone associated with a cult.
Sure you'll have a smart arse opie comment to make towards my post but I'm used to the games and tactics you bastards use. So in advance, Get Stuffed.

Makes me sick....
Pax....

Edited More furious words and phrases added...

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#29
(04-19-2009, 11:24 PM)Orville_B_Croft Wrote: You would think so wouldn't you. So blind.

Why don't you leave OD and get some real responsibilities like a real family (as opposed as the fake one you have in your nice study center) or become a religious instead of turning up to your home with your meals prepared and clothes washed by underpaid female associate numeraries all the while ripping children from their parents care at such vulnerable stages of their lives so as to keep the stupid promises you make every March 19th. Your oganisation is an affront to the 4th Commandment and the true Catholic faith.
Sure you'll have a smart arse comment to make towards my post but I'm used to the games and tactics you bastards use.

Makes me sick.

I wish you'd dispense with the politeness and just come out and make it clear how you feel.
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#30
Juan Peron said it best when he called Opus Dei, the "dollarization of Catholicism":

Opus Dei, qui tollis pecuniam mundi, dona nobis partem."

I can vouch for all of the shady tactics used by the Opus Dei in their recruiting and retention of members. In Latin America, they are notorious for it, and are looked upon with disdain by other parts of the Church, even orthodox and especially traditionalist ones.

There is something to be said of the sanctification of one's life through faithfulness to the duties of state, but I think the Opus Dei is doing something quite different and quite distorted. As we learned the hard way with the Jesuits, there is no way that the Church can outsmart the world using the world's tactics: it goes without saying that the world does it far better than tha Church can ever do it. If we get enough "influential" Catholics in the right places, it does not necessarily follow that people are going to start converting to the Church in droves. Besides, absolute power corrupts, and whatnot.

The only real way for the Church to bounce back will be through vocations, and more specifically, vocations to the contemplative life. "Work" is not the primary aim of man, contemplation is, and that is what is behind the real meaning of the original "opus Dei": the liturgy that leads to contemplation. That is how Europe was brought out of the "Dark Ages". The only way to get out of our malaise is to witness to the sacred and other-worldly nature of Christianity, not to prove that we can be "more worldly" than the world, and more Calvinist than a world driven by a Protestant and de-sacralized work ethic a la Max Weber
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