Beer
#11
Here's a maybe, get a six pack of mixed bottles of beer. Drink one each night at supper to test 'em. The food will make it more enjoyable to your taste buds, even if it's not a winner in the gum ball machine of life. LaRoza is right what is the push. If you and your boyz are going out for a fun night, see if you can get them to get pitchers, then get 'em to switch every refill, and as you whet your beak, maybe you'll find a good grain.
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#12
Gman Wrote:
Bonifacio Wrote:I didn't know beer was that expensive in the US.

In a bar there is going to be a mark up, and that usually depends on the bar. At a sporting event they really hike up the price, not only that but they water it down too.

FWIW, beer is almost never "watered down".  Sometimes it tastes like that, but it would be really rare to water down beer.  Dispensing systems don't really work like that unless someone made crazy modifications.  But sporting event beer is absurdly priced.  I think I paid like $9 for a beer in Yankee Stadium.  Absurd.
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#13
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:I think I paid like $9 for a beer in Yankee Stadium.  Absurd.

That is absurd, indeed.
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#14
Bonifacio Wrote:
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:I think I paid like $9 for a beer in Yankee Stadium.  Absurd.

That is absurd, indeed.

If you go to a restaurant chances are they'll charge you $2 at least for soda (free refills) and 5-7 bucks for a beer or scotch or gin and tonic.  This is true whether you're going to a cheap restaurant or an expensive restaurant; my scotch-neat always costs the same.
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#15
Bonifacio Wrote:
Quote:Originally Posted by WhollyRoaminCatholic
I think I paid like $9 for a beer in Yankee Stadium. Absurd.

That is absurd, indeed.

It is, but at the same time there is something great about having a beer at a ball game. It completes the picture. Plus, at a football game in the winter, sometimes beer is the only thing that can warm you up. For a little bit anyway.

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#16
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:You also won't like gin at first, because it tastes like pinecone extract.  It's called the "drinker's drink" because it takes some practice to appreciate the layers of flavors in gin (like learning to distinguish juniper flavors from botanical flavors).  But there's nothing more refreshing on a hot day after a long round of golf than a glass of Tanquerray Gin & Tonic.


I tried all brands of gin.  Then found out from a co-worker at a former place that he was a connoisseur of gin like myself.  He said to try Bombay Sapphire.  After he had that, he has not touched his bottle of Tanquerray in years.

So I got it, and now it is the only gin I drink.  This gin is great with tonic, but even better on its own.  For warm months, I like to get a bottle of organic lemonade and mix it in with gin and lot of ice.   The organic lemonade with my Captain Morgan's Special Reserve rum is good also, but only drink rum when I feel like a pirate.

This gin is simply the best.  The flavor is just outstanding.

[Image: bombay_sapphire_gr.jpg]

Now if you got money, you have to get single malt scotches that were only made on the islands of Islay or Skye in Scotland.  They are pricey, but they are a treat.  Expect to pay at least $50 for the low end.  Laphroaig and Talisker are my favorites.  There are other good single malts made in other regions as well.  Quite a variety depending on what kind of cask it was aged in (sherry cask, port cask, etc.) and for how long it was aged. 

[Image: laphroaig.jpg]  [Image: talisker_10years_gr.jpg]
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#17
Tulkas, now you're talking!

You know what, I haven't picked up a bottle of Sapphire in years.  I keep a bottle of the regular Bombay dry around the house, but I'll give it a go next time I'm out.  If I remember correctly, it was heavily botanical like Tanquerray 10.  But I don't remember exactly.  You've given me some fun homework!

I love scotch, but I don't think there are too many single malts that are worth the price.  But I received a bottle of Glenmorangie 18 year Port Wood several years ago that was a fine bottle of dram!  But get ready for scotch drinker's heresy: I think I'm actually more partial to the 10 year Glenmorangie.  It's not so richly peat and it's a little more salt & buttery, the flavors stand a little more on their own and aren't buried under the dirt.

Haven't had Laphroaig since I learned to drink scotch, but Talisker is a delightfully smoky and crisp.  Good on a cool autumn day with a single ice cube and a little waning sunshine.  Oh man, is it 5:00 yet?  I'm getting thirsty!
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#18
WhollyRoaminCatholic Wrote:Tulkas, now you're talking!

You know what, I haven't picked up a bottle of Sapphire in years.  I keep a bottle of the regular Bombay dry around the house, but I'll give it a go next time I'm out.  If I remember correctly, it was heavily botanical like Tanquerray 10.  But I don't remember exactly.  You've given me some fun homework!


On the side of the bottle of Sapphire, they have etched what plants they use to flavor it with.  I am working at the office so I do not have the bottle next to me.  You could go to www.bombaysapphire.com to learn more.
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#19
You have received some sound advice from WRC, but here is my 2 cents...

Beer is definitely an acquired taste.  And, as WRC suggested, you definitely need to find some manly beverages to enjoy.  In the beginning you'll be tempted to go for fruitier or sweeter stuff but once you have acquired a taste for real beer (which won't take that long) you'll be much happier in the end.  Real beer tastes much better than that other crap.

Firstly, don't drink Budweiser.  If you have to drink a cheap, major beer at least do yourself a favor and buy a 12 pack of Miller High Life.  That's not just my Wisconsin bias, but an objective taste fact.

Secondly, just try anything and everything (in moderation of course).  You will find some stuff that you like.  As long as the beer isn't flavored after something sweet like berry or lemonade or whatever you'll be just fine.  Often times just staying away from bright, flamboyant labels will keep you well within the confines of manly beer. 

Check around for microbrewery beers available in your area.  This is typically some of the best beer around.  Pabst Blue Ribbon is fantastic for cheap beer.  Leinenkugel's Honey Weiss is a beer that retains its manliness but is definitely cheap.  Rolling Rock is a smooth and refreshing beer that isn't too bitter.  If you ever come up to Wisconsin make sure to get a New Glarus Spotted Cow.  Blue Moon is a really nice Belgian beer as is Delirium if you can find it.  Belgians know their stuff.

Ciders are fantastic though they will not help you acquire a taste for beer.  They are sweet but still not girly.  The Irish drink more cider than beer.  Strongbow is the best thing available in this country on a national level.  Woodchuck is also good, but some of their flavors, like Green Apple, can be on the verge of alcoholic candy.

Until you've acquired a better taste for beer you might want to stay away from Newcastle Brown Ale, Guinness, Smithwick's, and some others.  These are definitely quite bitter.

I can't speak as much for liquors and such.  Gin and rum are the only things that are enjoyable to me.  I've yet to acquire a taste for whiskey (which I will) and my Irish forefathers are rolling in their graves.  Bailey's is almost too good with a cup of coffee.

Anyway, good luck.  Just get out there and try some good beers.  You'll really enjoy it.
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#20
Walty Wrote:Buy a 12 pack of Miller High Life. 

:laughing:

The champagne of beers?

Quote:Rolling Rock is a smooth and refreshing beer that isn't too bitter. 

High school/camping flashbacks. I'd recommend that alongside Natty Ice (read: I do not recommend either)

Quote:Blue Moon is a really nice Belgian beer as is Delirium if you can find it.  Belgians know their stuff.

Blue moon is really good. It tastes like flowers to me. Of course, no one agrees with me on that assessment.


Quote:Until you've acquired a better taste for beer you might want to stay away from Newcastle Brown Ale, Guinness, Smithwick's, and some others.  These are definitely quite bitter.

I don't think Newcastle is bitter at all. It's deceptively brown. edited to add: My friend's british husband told me that this is "Old Man Beer" in England.


Quote:I can't speak as much for liquors and such.  Gin and rum are the only things that are enjoyable to me.  I've yet to acquire a taste for whiskey (which I will) and my Irish forefathers are rolling in their graves.  Bailey's is almost too good with a cup of coffee.

I actually started my drinking career with gin. Now I can only drink it if it contains a handful of olives (read: dinner. it's a meal.)

Rum is good but dangerous.

As for whiskey, I started down that road with jack and cokes and manhattans. after that, you can graduate to the finer stuff.

Bailey's is good straight. Coffee just gets in the way sometimes.

I think most greenhorns start with vodka though, because it is tasteless and you can pretty much mix it with anything.

Btw - I hope I don't sound like a drunk. I bartended for years so I know my boozes pretty well. Nowadays, I very rarely have hard alcohol, except for tequila on special occasions. I mainly stick to beer and wine and after a glass or two, it's nighty night time. I'm old.
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