Breast-feeding another woman's baby.
#11
There may be some risks, but I can still see why she did it.  The risk would be greater if her child were a newborn, but her child is already one, and hardier than a newborn.

She may have had information about the baby's health that we don't have.  And with the way this notoreity would encourage other mothers in Africa to breastfeed, she has done a commendable thing.

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#12
Healthy people don't catch every virus that comes down the pike and good on Salma. :)

S.A.G. ~ Kathy ~ Sanguine-choleric. Have fun...or else.

Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi, quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
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#13
Jacafamala Wrote:
Satori Wrote:
Jacafamala Wrote:I understand the generosity that is behind her actions, but she's opening her own family up to health risks, most especially her infant child. Not a good idea.

I could be wrong, but I don't think you can get anything from breastfeeding a baby. Surely a woman like this would have been warned if that were the case.
Not true, you can get all sorts of illnesses, even aids.

Edited to add: often times, blood is involved with latch on in the initial stages of nursing. In addition, any sort of virus that's in the babie's home will be introduced into the mother's system. More than likely, the "officials" who gave the go ahead, didn't know. Most medical docs get precious little information in school about breastfeeding.

I was actually wondering about the risk of disease too because I'm a bit of a germaphobe. But like others have said, maybe the baby and his mother had a clean bill of health (at least nothing contagious.)

Also, Salma has been breast-feeding her daughter for over a year. I'm going to guess that her nipples are plenty tough at this point.
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#14
Hey I'm not making this stuff up. As a La Leche League Leader, I was told never to suggest that a woman wet nurse or share her milk. LLL's medical advisory board is the world's most knowledgeable and reliable breastfeeding resource today. From the LLL website here.

 
Oh my Jesus, I surrender myself to you. Take care of everything.--Fr Dolindo Ruotolo

Persevere..Eucharist, Holy Rosary, Brown Scapular, Confession. You will win.
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#15
Jacafamala Wrote:Hey I'm not making this stuff up. As a La Leche League Leader, I was told never to suggest that a woman wet nurse or share her milk. LLL's medical advisory board is the world's most knowledgeable and reliable breastfeeding resource today. From the LLL website here.

 

Oh no, I believe you. :laughing:

I think it is really cool that SHE did it. I don't know if I would do the same. Maybe in a dire emergency and if I was filled with the spirit of charity. More than likely, I would probably just pump. ;)

I was always interested in donating my surplus milk to a milk bank though. I didn't really have a surplus last time though. :(
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#16
I've done it. My sil's have all nursed  (or at least tried) each others children in a pinch. 
Bravo to Salma!! If she wasn't as gorgeous as she is I doubt there would be such an uproar. If this was a plainer Hollywood personailty such as Francis McDormand I highly doubt it would have made the news...anywhere.
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#17
mom Wrote:I've done it. My sil's have all nursed  (or at least tried) each others children in a pinch. 
Bravo to Salma!! If she wasn't as gorgeous as she is I doubt there would be such an uproar. If this was a plainer Hollywood personailty such as Francis McDormand I highly doubt it would have made the news...anywhere.

Well, she is known for her well endowed bosoms so I actually think it is extra cool because it is her. It's a reality check for our culture - as if to say, "yes, breasts have a function."
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#18
Jacafamala Wrote:
Satori Wrote:[quote='Jacafamala']
Not true, you can get all sorts of illnesses, even aids.

Everyone has AIDS!
AIDS AIDS AIDS!
AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS!
Everyone has AIDS!

And so this is the end of our story
And everyone is dead from AIDS
It took from me my best friend
My only true pal
My only bright star (he died of AIDS)

Well I'm gonna march on Washington
Lead the fight and charge the brigades
There's a hero inside of all of us
I'll make them see everyone has AIDS

My father (AIDS!)
My sister (AIDS!)
My uncle and my cousin and her best friend (AIDS AIDS AIDS!)
The gays and the straights
And the white and the spades

Everyone has AIDS!
My grandma and my dog 'ol blue (AIDS AIDS AIDS)
The pope has got it and so do you (AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS)
C'mon everybody we got quilting to do (AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS AIDS)
We gotta break down these baricades, everyone has
AIDS! x 20




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#19
Before the late 1800's, before Lister, Pasteur and the others who discovered microbes, if a mother died in childbirth, it was a death sentence to the baby as well if a wet nurse could not be procured.  The survival of the species depended on it.

Of course in our more "civilized" century, we know all about pathogenic microorganisms (germs) so we get very fearful.  Fact is, it is extremely rare for a mother to get some awful disease from nursing a child that is not her own.

I'm sure LLL does not recommend it due to liability issues.  33 years ago, when I first joined LLL, I'm here to tell you, the group I was in had no problem with it.

As a matter of fact, I've nursed two who were not my own.  One when I was babysitting for a friend, who through no fault of her own was delayed.  The baby was inconsolable, so I figured, "What the heck? Why not."  The baby just looked up at me with a look that seemed to say, "You're not mom, but you'll do."  Baby was sleeping calmly when mom arrived.  I only nursed that one once.

The second one I nursed more frequently.  That was my first grandson who is only 9 month younger than my youngest child.  My daughter lived with me and had to work part-time.  I nursed him several times to get him calmed until my daughter got home. 

My daughter also nursed her sister for the same reason when I had to be gone.

My oldest daughter once came home early to see both my grandson and my youngest latched on and nursing together.  She wanted to get a picture of that.  I threatened her with death if she dared to do so.

How many women can say they nursed a grandchild?

Oh!  God is Good!

edited for grammar
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#20
My father (born in 1924) had a wet nurse (a neighbor lady) when his mother couldn't produce enough milk.  This was very common before the advent of baby formula, which, even if it had existed, would have been beyond the reach of poor people.
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