Divine office
#11
I don't know if the Office is greater than the rosary.
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#12
Miquelot Wrote:Are there a Catholic equivalents of an abbreviated Divine Office that I can explore? 

The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary

I do not know if it is the same, but that was once quite popular and still is.

http://store.fraternitypublications.com/...lvima.html
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#13
didishroom Wrote:I don't know if the Office is greater than the rosary.

I would say that Office has the status of the highest form of Church prayer that is offical, but the Rosary is the greatest private devotion.

No where is the Office's benefits mentioned specifically, as it is meant to keep one praying constantly and focused on God at all times. The rosary however is like the poor man's Office (not to say they are exclusive!) and may be more pleasing depending on the reasons and devotion. The rosary also has the promises and advocation of Mary and Jesus.
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#14
http://books.google.com/books?id=a-4CAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=&as_brr=1&ei=aQ2XSci6L42ONozg8KQJ#PPP5,M1
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#15
Here are some online resources in addition to the ones cited above:

http://www.officiumdivinum.org/

http://www.breviary.net/

The most economical print version (Diurnal) is:

http://stores.lulu.com/breviary

Get the Breviarium then download for free Vol 2 of the day hours.  The Breviarium is a Latin/English diurnal that is very nice.  The only thing it lacks is a complete Proper of Saints, which is currently being compiled.  To make up for this, simply print a "months worth" of the Proper of Saints from Vol 2 of the Day hours and tuck the appropriate day (usually only a page, maybe two) into the Breviarium each day.  You will have a complete 1962 Diurnal in Latin/English for less than $20.00! 

Honestly, it blows my mind why people wait year after year for Baronius to print a Latin/English breviary that will likely cost a couple hundred dollars when David, a member of Fisheaters, is providing these wonderful resources at cost.  The font and graphics of this diurnal are nicer than the FSSP breviary and its supplements which I recently bought for almost $300.00.  If you want to get started saying the traditional Office, this is the way to go.  If the absence of Matins bothers you, you could use these resources in conjunction with the Anglican Breviary or breviary.net. 

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#16
The order for Morning, Afternoon, and Evening Prayer in the Anglican Use Book of Divine Worship is quite simple, but I probable run the risk of bringing down the wrath of Traditionalists for saying so! 
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#17
didishroom Wrote:I don't know if the Office is greater than the rosary.

It is.

The confusion lies in the fact that Latin Christians are terribly ignorant of the Office, it's purpose, meaning and goals. The Office has been with the Church since day one. Literally, it was the Psalms being prayed those nine days in the upper room before Pentecost. If the Holy Mass is the heart of the Church, the Divine Office are the veins. The two are intimately connected - so much so that the rubrics of the Mass and Office allow for their combination. If one wanted a visual, the Church without the Office (as is unfortunately the practical reality in the Roman Rite) is as if the Body of Christ only had one arm, or one lung.

While the Rosary is a great private prayer, objectively speaking liturgical, communal prayer is a higher form of praying. Subjectively speaking, the prayer of a man who rushes through his Office like an auctioneer may hold less weigh than one who says his Rosary with attention.
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#18
Credo Wrote:
didishroom Wrote:I don't know if the Office is greater than the rosary.

It is.

The confusion lies in the fact that Latin Christians are terribly ignorant of the Office, it's purpose, meaning and goals. The Office has been with the Church since day one. Literally, it was the Psalms being prayed those nine days in the upper room before Pentecost. If the Holy Mass is the heart of the Church, the Divine Office are the veins.

That's a very good way to put it, Credo! I like that. And I agree wholeheartedly! I think some might say that because the Rosary (Mary's Psalter) is an outgrowth of the 150 Psalms of David, it, too, is like an "official prayer." When for centuries most laymen couldn't read or write, the rosary was one way for everyone to participate. But you're right, the Mass and the Divine Office are intimately connected.
 While priests are required by Canon Law to pray the entire Office every day, the Second Vatican Council strongly encouraged Christian laity to also pray the Office. Many of us can't fit the entire prayer into our daily schedules, so saying the morning and evening prayers are common. At our store we sell the whole 4-volume set (Catholic Book Pub)  which comes with Guide Books, and we also sell the abbreviated "Book of Christian Prayer." The Christian Prayer is a one-volume edition of the LOTH. In size, Christian Prayer is about as big as a Bible. (LOTH takes up 4 Bible-sized volumes).  The little monthly book the "Magnifcat" (with its glossy cover of beautiful artwork) contains the morning prayer, the Mass, the vespers, and hymns for every day of the month. An annual subscription is pricey but well worth it, and it arrives in your mailbox about a month ahead of time. It's like a "third arm" to me now, and I can't imagine my life before it. It really puts you in the rhythm of the liturgical year!  Here are some links to sites that nicely explain the development of the Divine Office and its importance.. for what it's worth.  
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#19
Credo Wrote:
didishroom Wrote:I don't know if the Office is greater than the rosary.

It is.

The confusion lies in the fact that Latin Christians are terribly ignorant of the Office, it's purpose, meaning and goals. The Office has been with the Church since day one. Literally, it was the Psalms being prayed those nine days in the upper room before Pentecost. If the Holy Mass is the heart of the Church, the Divine Office are the veins. The two are intimately connected - so much so that the rubrics of the Mass and Office allow for their combination. If one wanted a visual, the Church without the Office (as is unfortunately the practical reality in the Roman Rite) is as if the Body of Christ only had one arm, or one lung.

While the Rosary is a great private prayer, objectively speaking liturgical, communal prayer is a higher form of praying. Subjectively speaking, the prayer of a man who rushes through his Office like an auctioneer may hold less weigh than one who says his Rosary with attention.

From The Secret of the Rosary by St Louis de Montfort:

Quote:Ever since Saint Dominic established the devotion to the Holy Rosary up until the time when Blessed Alan de la Roche re-established it in 1460, it has always been called the Psalter of Jesus and Mary. This is because it has the same number of Angelic Salutations as there are Psalms in the Book of the Psalms of David. Since simple and uneducated people are not able to say the Psalms of David the Rosary is held to be just as fruitful for them as David's Psalter is for others.

But the Rosary can be considered to be even more valuable than the latter for three reasons:

1. Firstly, because the Angelic Psalter bears a nobler fruit, that of the Word Incarnate, whereas David's Psalter only prophesies His coming;
2. Secondly, just as the real thing is more important than its prefiguration and as the body is more than its shadow, in the same way the Psalter of Our Lady is greater than David's Psalter which did no more than prefigure it;
3. And thirdly, because Our Lady's Psalter (or the Rosary made up of the Our Father and Hail Mary) is the direct work of the Most Blessed Trinity and was not made through a human instrument.
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#20
No offense to S. Louis, but it's objective that liturgical prayer is superior to private devotions.
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