Novus Ordo Confessionals
#11
Rex_Tremendae Wrote:Well how many FSSPX chapels have this style confessionals? my FSSP has cramped confessionals that a large person would probably have trouble fitting in.

It depends on the architecture mostly. I've seen large spacious confessionals and small very concealing ones in NO churches.
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#12
Bonifacio Wrote:I understand that with or without screen, we should always be kneeling in sign of repentance when confessing our sins to the priest.

I've never heard that, personally.  I had face-to-face all the time in high school as we would just go to the Jesuit's office.  He would sit at his desk and we would sit in a chair next to the desk.   For the absolution, we would bow our heads.
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#13
Rex_Tremendae Wrote:
LaRoza Wrote:
Rex_Tremendae Wrote:What is your opinions about the larger Novus Ordo confesssionals built so that you can sit directly across from the priest face-to-face? What is opinion on confessing in this manner?


That really has nothing to do with the Pauline Mass. It has always been an option.

Many prefer it that way, some prefer a screen. Some do it in public. It is only a personal preference.

Really?

Yes, one can always confess face to face and in other rites, it is this way by default in the open although in a low voice so no one can hear.
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#14
Rex_Tremendae Wrote:Really?

Indeed. The screen or booth seems to be alien to most Catholics of the Middle Ages, having been introduced in the Reformation/Counter-Reformation period of the 1600's.... perhaps to curb accusations of impropriety between priests and women, as the Reformers liked to do.

A Tour of a Catholic Church, by Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M., S.T.D. Wrote:
"In some churches it is common to see one or more confessionals, small
"rooms" built out from the side or back wall of the church containing
a place for the priest confessor to sit, separated by a screen or
grill from the place for the penitent to kneel and confess his or her
sins. Confessionals appeared in Catholic churches during the 16th
century
and were common until just recently. The current ritual for
the individual celebration of the sacrament offers the penitent a
choice between speaking face-to-face with the priest or the anonymity
provided by the confessional screen. This option has necessitated the
remodeling of confessionals in some churches and the construction of a
reconciliation chapel in others."

The Grove Dictionary of Art Wrote:"Several types of confessional were in existence during the Middle
Ages. In the 12th century the priest was seated while the penitent
knelt in front of him.
From the 14th century in Sweden, where men
lived alongside women in double monasteries, grilles were inserted in
special recesses in the choir walls to prevent the priest from coming
into contact with the sisters."

A History of the Inquisition of Spain Wrote:"[95] The seduction of female penitents by their confessors,
euphemistically known as solicitatio ad turpia or "solicitation," has
been a perennial source of trouble to the Church since the
introduction of confession, more especially after the Lateran Council
of 1216 rendered yearly confession to the parish priest obligatory.
It
was admitted to be a prevailing vice, and canonists sought some
abatement of the evil by arguing that the priest notoriously addicted
to it lost his jurisdiction over his female parishioners, who were
thus at liberty to seek the sacrament of penitence from others. (1) A
Spanish authority, however, holds that this requires the licence of
the parish priest himself and, when he refuses it, the woman must
confess to him, after prayer to God for strength to resist his
importunities. (2)

"It was an evil of which repression was impossible, notwithstanding
penalties freely threatened. A virtue of uncommon robustness was
required to resist the temptations arising from the confidences of the
confessional, and so well was this understood that an exception was
made to the rule requiring perfect confession, for reticence as to
carnal sins was counselled, when the reputation of the priest rendered
it advisable. (3) Few women thus approached, whether yielding or not,
could be expected to denounce their pastors to the bishop or provisor,
and for her who yielded the path to sin was made easy through the
universal abuse of absolution by her accomplice, and this, although
objected to on ethical grounds, was admitted to be valid."

And:

Quote:"The intercourse between priest and penitent was especially [96]
dangerous because there had not yet been invented the device of the
confessional
--a box or stall in which the confessor sits with his ear
at a grille, through which the tale of sins conceived or committed is
whispered. Seated by his side or kneeling at his feet, there was
greater risk of inflaming passion and much more opportunity for
provocative advances. It was not until the middle of the sixteenth
century that the confessional was devised, doubtless in consequence of
the attacks of heretics, who found in these scandals a fertile subject
of animadversion.
The earliest allusion to it that I have met occurs
in a memorial from Siliceo of Toledo to Charles V, in 1547. (5) In
1565 a Council of Valencia prescribed its use and contemporaneously S.
Carlo Borromeo introduced it in his Milanese province, while in 1614
the Roman Ritual commanded its employment in all churches. 6) "

I hope someone actually appreciates my cursory historical research this time.
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#15
that reasoning makes a lot of sense, especially considering that the old Roman Ritual said that men could recieve confession anywhere but that women had to do so in the confessional except in danger of death.
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#16
QuisUtDeus Wrote:
Bonifacio Wrote:I understand that with or without screen, we should always be kneeling in sign of repentance when confessing our sins to the priest.
I've never heard that, personally.  I had face-to-face all the time in high school as we would just go to the Jesuit's office.  He would sit at his desk and we would sit in a chair next to the desk.   For the absolution, we would bow our heads.
Perhaps the priest being a Jesuit explains it since most of them have become liberal and hardly catholic. As far as I was taught, kneeling while confessing your sins to a priest who is acting in persona Christi is a sign of repentance and humility. To do otherwise - unless by physical impediment - would be an outward sign that you weren't truly repentant.

Actually, in my lifetime, I've never witnessed confessions made in any other way. I've confessed face to face (rarely) or with the screen but always kneeling.
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#17
Bonifacio Wrote:I understand that with or without screen, we should always be kneeling in sign of repentance when confessing our sins to the priest.

Actually, I find no such requirement:

I looked in other parts also and found no reference to position.
Quote:Can. 964 §1. The proper place to hear sacramental confessions is a church or oratory.

§2. The conference of bishops is to establish norms regarding the confessional; it is to take care, however, that there are always confessionals with a fixed grate between the penitent and the confessor in an open place so that the faithful who wish to can use them freely.

§3. Confessions are not to be heard outside a confessional without a just cause.
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#18
Even so-called "reconcilation rooms" should have a screen/divider and a kneeler when you first enter the room. The priest should be sitting behind the screen by default.. Only when the penitent asks to go face-to-face does the priest get up and walk around the screen. There are usually two chairs nearby where they proceed face-to-face.
 
I'm not saying that every church does it this way.. Some of the older churches still have the old confessional booths and for that there is no option. But if there is a "reconciliation room" the option should be there. 

- Lisa
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#19
I alway kneel and use the screened confessional. Only twice in my life have I used the face to face confession. Neither time was what you could call "a soul satisfying" experience. In fact the first time I was sort of trapped. It was during Lent and there was a very long line.
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#20
the way my old novus ordo parish did it, the screen was there as you walked into the room and the priest was behind it, but you could walk around the screen to where there was a chair for ya; I think that's really the best option if there is to be a reconciliation room thingermajiger
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