Novus Ordo Confessionals
#21
When I first converted I always went face-to-face, it made it easier for me, especially not knowing exactly what to do. Lately, I've been going behind the screen because I feel embarrassed confessing the same sins over and over again and also the nature of the sins [Image: embarrassed.gif]. I know the priest probably doesn't even remember me but I'm very glad for that screen.
Most of the parishes I go to for Confession there is the option for face to face or screened. The priest can't see you unless you sit in the chair.


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#22
For 500 years the screen/ booth has been the standard, although face to face was never disallowed. You are correct that Vatican II brought back the practice of face to face confessions, but the innovators made sure, in many cases, it was in a completely different context. They constructed "reconciliation rooms" with couches and kleenex, in the likes of a psychiatrist's office. They meant to shift the focus from absolution of sin to psychology. You see this today in the liberals' continual denial of the demonic, wanting to explain away every possession through science and doing a great disservice to the possessed. Fr. Amorth points this out especially of the German Bishops. The "reconciliation rooms" (I saw one completely made of glass) are not preferred by most priests I know. Most priests, in my experience, would rather a screen to keep the sins and faces dissassociated and help them to forget them easier, rather than the distraction of a face to face confession.

Growing up the Novus Ordo parish I went to sort of made you feel guilty if you did not confess face to face, as if you should feel cowardly or ashamed not to. Extra penance maybe? Don't know.

I think it was a reaction by the liberals to do away with the cold impersonal screens and confessionals and create a warm caring environment where you can sit and have a chat with father about your problems. These reconciliation rooms, in my opinion, often eat up the priest's time because penitents are much more apt to wax on in conversation with the priest on the psychiatrist's couch rather than confessing their sins, receiving absolution and saving the chatting for an appointment.

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#23
Bonifacio Wrote:As far as I was taught, kneeling while confessing your sins to a priest who is acting in persona Christi is a sign of repentance and humility. To do otherwise - unless by physical impediment - would be an outward sign that you weren't truly repentant.

Actually, in my lifetime, I've never witnessed confessions made in any other way. I've confessed face to face (rarely) or with the screen but always kneeling.

Bonifacio, this is the way it was typically done in the 50's prior to Vatican II for the very reasons you stated. Since it was the norm before VCII, that means it earned the libs' ire and was nixed. Same with kneeling for Holy Communion.
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#24
StevusMagnus Wrote:Growing up the Novus Ordo parish I went to sort of made you feel guilty if you did not confess face to face, as if you should feel cowardly or ashamed not to.

I think the liberals do not like confession. I also think they wanted to keep people from telling all their sins. Since it was no longer taught that mortal sins needed to be confessed, they didn't care if people felt uneasy confessing face to face. Once I was given absolution when I didn't want to confess, and didn't want to get absolution. I really think the liberals wanted to do what they could to get people out of the habit of confession.


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#25
Telemaque Wrote:I think they wanted people to avoid confession. I also think they wanted to keep people from telling all their sins. Since it was no longer taught that mortal sins needed to be confessed, they didn't care if people felt uneasy confessing face to face. That's the impression I had. Once I was given absolution when I didn't want to confess, and didn't want to get absolution. I really think the liberals wanted to do what they could to get people out of the habit of confession.

In my experience, liberal priests and Catholics really think it is sort of unnecessary an antiquated. I told a liberal Catholic that I confessed weekly and that I enjoyed it. He asked me if I was crazy. He said he hadn't confessed since he got married 4 years ago and he only went then because of (I assume) acts with his then girlfriend. He expressed that he hated confession and sees no need to go now unless he commits some major sin ( I suppose murder?).

Likewise one liberal priest, for my penance, had me read a book on scruples! I assure you everything I confessed was a sin.

Liberal Bishops like Kieran Conry apparently don't think frequent confession is a good idea either...

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/features/f0000353.shtml

Quote:Is it a good idea to go to Confession regularly? "No, because my own experience when we had Confession every day at St Chad's Cathedral in Birmingham was that regular penitents came back with exactly the same words week after week. So there you would say, actually, there is no conversion taking place."

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#26
Let's not forget how our Eastern Catholic brethren do it. And it's done in the Sanctuary!

[Image: confession.jpg]


I don't like the 'Reconciliation Rooms' for the fact of what they're called. They didn't invent these rooms and do away with the confessional to be more Eastern. They did it to make it seem 'nicer' and more like a shrink's office.
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#27
didishroom Wrote:I don't like the 'Reconciliation Rooms' for the fact of what they're called. They didn't invent these rooms and do away with the confessional to be more Eastern. They did it to make it seem 'nicer' and more like a shrink's office.

Does a shrink's office have a crucifix on the wall? I'm sorry but the average "novus ordo experience" talked about here is not mine. At our parish the kids at school go to confession every Wednesday, starting from grade 3 to 8 and then over again. That means the kids go to confession every six weeks. If they have no sins to confess, I guess the priest just blesses them.
 
The sacrament of Penance has changed down through the centuries. In the early days there was public penance and it was stiff and sometimes lasted a person's lifetime. Often they had to stand in the back of church - in a place designated for penitents so everyone knew you were bad. Or they had to sit with the catechumens. Penance in the 16th century was tame compared to that.
 
- Lisa
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#28
I'm not dissing "NO Confession." I am just stating that I don't like the metality behind the original push for these so-called "Reconcilation." From the picture I posted, you can see I'm not quite ignorant on the different ways of how confession is done.
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#29
StevusMagnus Wrote:
Bonifacio Wrote:As far as I was taught, kneeling while confessing your sins to a priest who is acting in persona Christi is a sign of repentance and humility. To do otherwise - unless by physical impediment - would be an outward sign that you weren't truly repentant.

Actually, in my lifetime, I've never witnessed confessions made in any other way. I've confessed face to face (rarely) or with the screen but always kneeling.

Bonifacio, this is the way it was typically done in the 50's prior to Vatican II for the very reasons you stated. Since it was the norm before VCII, that means it earned the libs' ire and was nixed. Same with kneeling for Holy Communion.

Stevus,
I agree with you. The old confessional box looked like a symbol of a bygone age to the post VatII thurifers. That was the very reason it was rejected and demolished when this was possible.
But the long excerpts that Harlequin King quoted on the dangerous promiscuity between women and priests in the past before the use of the confessional was implemented show that the same causes will bring the same effects and that the face to face confessions today are probably leading a number priests to sin with their penitent women.
Like the communion in the hand currently is found to be the cause of a number of abuses and desecrations that already existed in the early times and led the Church to enforce the communion on the tongue.

My personal opinion is that I feel much easier in the confessional box than in a face to face with the priest. I am afraid that the huge drop in the confession attendances is at least partially accountable of this new postcounciliar practice.
Why to tempt the Devil?
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#30
But the long excerpts that Harlequin King quoted on the dangerous promiscuity between women and priests in the past before the use of the confessional was implemented show that the same causes will bring the same effects and that the face to face confessions today are probably leading a number priests to sin with their penitent women.
I'ld be more worried about little children.
 
These Reconciliation Rooms now have windows on the door, so promiscuity shouldn't be a problem in there any more, as long as someone else is waiting in line for Confession.

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